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Full text of "S.F. News Letter (Jan.-June 1900)"

2007 1E01715 7 

California Slate Library 

CALir-UKNIA 
STATE LIBRARY 



Call No. CL.CV OS\ 



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ESTABLISHED JULY 30. 1850 







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Vol. LX 



SAN FRANCISCO, JANUARY 6, 1900. 



Number 1. 



Printed and published every Saturday by the proprietor, PBKD MARRIOTT 
B*iraniT street. San Francisco, Entered tit Bu Franolsco Poet" 
iss Matter. 
Tbe off ITER in New York City Is at 331 Turk Rn,v 

HI. Ik'.. Prod A. Marriott Eastern Representative . whore Information 
may be obtained regarding subscription ami advertising rates. 
All social Item- <nts. advertising, or other matter, intended lor 

: cation In the current number of the NEWS LETTER, slioul.l be 
not later than six o'clock Thursday afternoon. 

THE Examiner is still opposed to any trust of which it 
is not a member. 

THE pleasing theory that war in tbe Philippines was 
about over seems to have collided with a circum- 
stance. 

THE Oakland footpad who held up a deaf and dumb 
woman this week may be said to have worked a 
silent game. 

HAS the growing interest in the production of hemp in 
this State nothing to do with the alleged Fenian 
movement? 

THE page of "California Beauties" published by the 
Call is a libel on the State and a joke on the 
"beauties." 

IT is remarkable how many "society" women go upon the 
stage without ever having been beard of by society 
previous to the important event. 

IW AYOR PHELAN'S appointments did juch towards 
II demoralizing the political lightning-rod market. 
There is a glut of the article, second-hand. 

GENERAL FUNSTON declares that he did swim a 
river, and doubtless he did. But it was our own 
Harrison Gray Otis who crossed the Rubicon. 

A BOGUS variety of the White Cap is trying to oper- 
ate across the bay, but while bogus, it seems to em- 
body all the mean qualities of the real thing. 

« SYMPATHETIC public would be glad to see the old 
Morgue horses given a permanent vacation, with a 
guarantee of immunity from the sausage man. 

IF there is a limit to the size of battleships, the United 
States navy is reaching out for it. The famous Oregon 
seems destined to look like a pocket edition. 

OVERPOWERED by superior forces, Mrs. Aguinaldo 
surrendered to our Uncle Samuel's brave volunteers. 
Mr. Aguinaldo was not among those present at the cere- 
monies. 

THE purpose of promoting Li Hung Chang seems to be 
that of degrading him, and he is never degraded save 
in order to make his promotion possible. Altogether, the 
old man keeps up a fair average. 

THERE is genuine Celtic humor in the proposal of the 
Toledo Irishmen to dispatch a hospital ship to the aid 
of the Boers. Is the vessel to have wheels and to travel 
on dry land? Or is it only an air-ship? 

EVEN if the present year is only the last of the nine- 
teenth, instead of the first of the twentieth century, 
it enjoys in a large measure the distinction of brevity. 
Expressed in Roman numerals, 1900 is simply MCM., 
shorter than anything we have had since the seventeenth 
century. It will be necessary to wait for a hundred sears 
to get a further curtailment, when 2000 will be MM. In 
the meantime, as the latter date is not likely to trouble 
any of us much, MCM. is a great improvement on 
MDCCCXCIX. 



PROFESSIONAL haters of corporations will find it 
hard work to make capital out of the voluntary ar- 
rangement of the Pennsylvania line to pension all its old 
employees. Still, they will make the endeavor. 

THE Methodist Bishop of Buffalo wires the Examiner, 
collect, that America and England must keep tbe 
world's peace. Yes? The tip may be all right in spirit, 
but two nations with a war each might think the good man 
joshing them. 

NOT satisfied with dum-dum bullets, lyddite shells, and 
firing on flags of truce, the Boers have added to the 
horrors of modern warfare by bombarding the British 
with plum puddings. Ninety-seven British stomachs are 
reported lost. 

JUDGE LAWLER appears to entertain the idea that 
a murderer is not a fitting subject to be slobbered 
over, and leaves this form of degenerate expression to be 
supplied by the jury. The assassin looking for a snap will 
try to avoid this Judge. 

THE Boer spy who dug his own grave just before stop- 
ping six British bullets, did for himself what Kruger 
has done for the Boer nation. The man of peculiar 
whiskers has dodged the inevitable for the moment, but 
the delay is not for long. 

REV. B. Fay Mills of Oakland wishes that city to imi- 
tate San Francisco in the matter of a bond issue for 
municipal improvement. The reverend gentleman, having 
given up his orthodox heaven, naturally wishes his earthly 
abode to be made as desirable as possible. Since Oakland 
does not suit, and as he has foresworn heaven, the only 
refuge left him appears to be the new San Francisco. 
God help us. 

ON a recent night a stranger strayed into one of the 
dives along Kearny street, and upon realizing that he 
was being robbed, showed resentment by carving his 
monogram with a razor on the ribs of the robber in chief. 
The whole episode was but a common affair in low life, and 
yet it is not devoid of its lessons. In the first place, the 
existence of such places is a disgrace to San Francisco; 
in the second place, a person visiting there is more or less 
a fool, and in the third place, a razor is not an effective 
instrument of reform, since it permitted the survival of 
the unfittest. 

"TT cannot be hired like a lawyer, to defend wrong or 
1 protect evil. ... Its aims are high; its ethics 
pure." The passage to which your attention is invited, 
.'brethren, is from a screed by an editor, concerning the 
profession he adorns. It is good to learn from exalted 
source that journalism is as he describes it. Some of us 
in our blindness had deemed that in a measure it fell short 
of these ideals. The daily papers of this city, for instance, 
hurling epithets at each other, and at anybody and any- 
thing failing „., please them, have given rise to a fallacious 
notion that into journalism there has crept error, even as 
typographical mischance creeps into the columns. This 
re-assurance of probity and of lofty motive is a real com- 
fort. It exposes as a baseless canard the report that 
blackmail is ever practiced, and sweeps away any wicked 
suspicion that corruption has ever wormed its course up 
the editorial back stairs. Now all that can be asked of 
the press is that it live up to the standard voluntarily set 
by itself. Let it manufacture no more news, endorse no 
more rottenness, practice deception no longer, for as "it 
cannot be hired to defend wrong or protect evil," by doing 
these things it creates the impression that some agent of 
Satan is working it for a sucker. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 6, 1900. 



THE MAYOR'S APPOINTMENTS. 

MAYOR PHELAN has well met the supremest test of 
his fitness to exercise the large powers conferred 
upon him by the new charter. He has resisted every sort 
of pressure from place hunters and their friends, and on 
his own motion alone has gone straight for the best man 
he could get to fill each particular place, without much 
regard to politics or party affiliations. More than one- 
half of his appointees are Republicans, and presumably 
were among his opponents at the late election. In every 
case a special fitness is discernible, while party polities 
appear to have been lost sight of. No Bosses have been 
consulted, no "pushes" or "pulls" have been tolerated, no 
bargains or compromises have been entered into, and no 
dickers as to patronage, contracts or other favors at the 
public expense have been so much as thought of. The 
civil service examiners become lords paramount in the 
matter of patronage — that is to say, fitness as ascertained 
by practical tests is to be the rule governing the employ- 
ment of municipal officers. We make no doubt that this 
important commission will discharge the onerous obliga- 
tions imposed upon it without fear, favor, or affec- 
tion. The best men will win, and thereafter they will 
have only to attend strictly to business, and avoid wire 
pulling and obnoxious meddling in local politics in order to 
keep their places. Efforts will be made from time to time, 
through the columns of the daily press and otherwise, to 
break down this keystone feature of our new municipal 
structure. They must be watched and defeated every 
time. The greatest difficulties the commissioners will have 
to encounter will be at the start. They will have a great 
deal to do, and very little time to do it in. It would seem 
to be wise to let the present employees hold over for 
awhile, to the end that time be gained in which to make 
the examinations thorough. 

Perhaps the strongest of all Mayor Phelan's Commission 
is that which is to constitute the Board of Public Works. 
It is eminently proper that it should be so. It will pre- 
sently have the spending of a large sum of money in public 
works. It is of the first importance that the newly 
authorized loans be expended wisely and well. If tbere 
were to be any serious mistakes, or waste and extrava- 
gance, it would be many a long day before our people 
would authorize any more borrowing. Happily, there 
need be little fear of anything of the kind happening with 
such men at the helm as Col. Geo. H. Mendell, Marsden 
Manson, and Jeremiah Mahoney. The Mayor was extremely 
fortunate in being able to command the services of such 
men. Colonel Mendall is a graduate of West Point and 
for many years was attached to the Engineer Corps, in 
which capacity he carried out many very important 
government works. Marsden Manson is also an eminent 
engineer who has had much to do with public improve- 
ments in this State. Mr. Mahoney is known as an honest 
contractor. The Crocker building is one of the many 
monuments to bis constructive ability to be found in this 
city. He can be depended upon to see that good work is 
done and that, at the same time, the contractors are 
fairly treated. On all sides the greatest confidence is 
expressed in the New Board of Public Works. 

The Police Commission is perhaps the next in import- 
ance. It consists of William Thomas, of the law firm of 
Chickering, Gregory and Thomas; Geo. A. Newhall, a 
prominent business man whom everybody knows; Dr. W. 
F. McNutt, the eminent physician, and W. J. Biggy, who 
made a creditable record as a member of the Legislature. 
In selecting this Commission the Mayor seems to have 
gone in search of fair minded men without a political re- 
cord; Mr. Biggy being the only one of the four experienced 
in public life. Dr. McNutt says in a newspaper interview 
that the only promise the Mayor exacted of him was that 
"he would give the Police Department a thorough reno- 
vating." If the same promise has been given by the other 
Commissioners we may soon expect to see the beginning 
of a reform the value of which it would be hard to over- 
estimate. Much might be said on this subject, but we 
forbear. We hope great thiogs of the new Police Com- 
mission. In the end, however, it will be judged by the 
fruit it bears. 

The New Board of Health consists of five of the most 
energetic and public-spirited physicians we have in our 



midst. We believe they are all workers who will attend 
to their public duties; a thing which many of our past 
Boards of He.alth have neglected to do. The appointment 
of Dr. J. M. Williamson is a graceful recognition of the 
services he rendered the city when serving on the Budd 
Board of Health. It will be remembered that when it 
seemed to be impossible to get the City and County 
Hospital run as it ought to be, Dr. Williamson volunteered 
to put the place straight, which he did, neglecting his 
private practice and serving without pay. Dr. Bazet also 
served on the Budd Board of Health- -the best this city 
has ever had. 

The new Board of Education could hardly be bettered. 
At its head is the venerable James Denman who probably 
knows more of the workings of our educational depart- 
ment than any man living. For long years the principal 
of one of our foremost public schools, he won name and 
fame as an educator, and subsequently the people elected 
him to the position of Superintendent of Public Instruction. 
In view of the large number of lady teachers in the de- 
partment, it was fitting that they should have a repre- 
sentative on the Board, and none better could have been 
chosen than Mrs. Kincaid, ex-principal of the girls high 
school. Teacher's positions will no longer be sold for coin, 
nor given to "pets" of School Directors. 

The other Commissions are of less importance, but are 
all satisfactorily filled. "These appointments, taken as a 
whole, give promise that San Francisco has at last entered 
upon an era of good government. 



GOVERNMENT OF THE PEOPLE BY THE PAPERS FOR 
THE PAPERS. 

« RECENT and somewhat remarkable article, by a 
grotesque, if not impressive, writer, on "Twentieth 
Century Journalism," says that "government by news- 
papers, sometimes slightingly spoken of 'to-day, will be 
realized in the twentieth century." This is a startling pre- 
diction, and has created more excitement in journalistic 
circles than anything that has occurred in this neighbor- 
hood since some humorous rascal substituted a bottle of 
red ink for the late Brother Pickering's bottle of hair 
dye. The writer under review proceeds to explain his 
words by further stating that: "This does not mean gov- 
ernment by newspaper men, but government under the 
guidance of great newspapers — government by the peo- 
ple." This is as clear as mud, and out of its clarity there 
shines, with all the refulgence of a tallow candle search- 
light on a foggy night, the truth of that great and log- 
ical axiom: "We are the people." It is to be notea that, 
under this new dispensation, the newspapers are not to 
actually undertake the execution of the functions of gov- 
ernment. Tbey will condescend to permit the duly quali- 
fied administrative, legislative and judicial officers to dis- 
charge their duties "under the guidance of great news- 
papers." Courts, and Congresses, and Legislatures, and 
Presidents, and Governors, and Cabinets are to surrender 
all idea of using their own judgment, and are to do ex- 
actly what the "great newspapers" tell them. States- 
men and jurists are to become bell boys and clerks to the 
owners of types and presses. The old and somewhat 
onerous road to influence and power in public affairs that 
was travelled by Sherman, and Thurman, and Lincoln, and 
Douglass, and Sumner, and Webster, and Clay is to be 
abandoned in favor of a short cut made by investing some 
thousands of dollars in printing materials. Short cuts, it 
may be added, are all right in the daylight, but they are 
liable to be beset with dangers in the night. Many a man 
has broken his neck that way. 

THE TWO WARS WITH WHICH THE CENTURY ENDS. 

IT is a curious and lamentable fact that at the end of 
the most enlightened century the world has ever seen, 
the two nations that are engaged in wars, and questiona- 
ble ones at that, are the two nations supposed to be the 
most advanced in civilization. We are in the Philippines 
— God only knows why — and for over a year have been 
fighting and sacrificing some of the best blood of our na- 
tion, and for what and with what result ? We began our 
war with Spain in order to free Cuba, and thereafter to 
leave the government of the island to the free will of its 
people. We. went to the Philippines in order to destroy 
the Spanish fleet sheltered there and prevent its preying 



January 6. 1900 



SAN 1 : ill: 



upon our Pacific Coast commerce. Thanks to Admiral 
Dewey and his bravo men, that was accomplished in 
ordor What then ? We found ourselves among innu- 
merable islands that were fair to the eye and good to look 
upon. We al once coveted them as David did the wife nf 
Hagar. and sought, contrary t-i the principles upon which 
our Republic was founded, to make them our own. It 
happens that we have not yet accomplished that design, 
and the chances are that we never will accomplish it. We 
may appear to do so, but the time will never come when 
the natives, the rightful owners of the soil, wtll not seek 
opportunities to ambush and slaughter their conquerors. 
A standing army of not less than seventy-live thousand 
soldiers will have to be kept there for more years than 
any man alive to-day can set bounds to. Before we en- 
tered upon this policy of foreign aggression an army of 
1 men were deemed sufficient to keep the peace all 
over this broad continent, and they found little to do but 
ploy at soldiering, even then. Our Mother Country is in 
a snrry plight, only less deplorable than our own. She 
had grievances against the Boers, which she sought to 
redress by peaceable negotiations which promised success, 
but in a night, ^resident Kruger changed what appeared 
to be bis mind, issued an ultimatum and opened hostilities. 
The gauntlet thus thrown down had to be picked up; there 
was no other way for it. The fight is on, and temporarily 
the Mother Country, being unprepared, is getting the 
worst nf it, but the end is not in doubt. It could have 
been devoutly wished that the glorious Nineteenth Cen- 
tury might have ended with a better record. It all comes 
of the ever-pushing and onward march of our race. Eng- 
land's apparent destiny required that she should keep 
control of the Transvaal, whilst our own demanded that we 
should secure a strong foothold among the teeming mil- 
lions of the Orient. Neither power has any stones to 
throw at the other. They are both working to the same 
end, the survival of the fittest. 



THE EXAMINER AND PROFESSOR JORDAN. 

SETER a delay extending from the 19th of November 
last, the Examiner has been constrained to admit 
that the article which it attributed to David Starr Jordan 
in its issue of that date, and which if written by him would 
have wholly destroyed his influence at the Stanford Uni- 
versity, was in fact the contribution of one of its own staff. 
It says : "Owing to an accidental transposition of head- 
lines, an article written by David Starr Jordan was cred- 
ited to Edgar Saltus, and an article by Edgar Saltus 
was credited to Dr. Jordan." This explanation does not 
explain, andis wholly untrue. Dr. Jordan wrote no arti- 
cle for that Sunday's issue of the Examiner, as it well 
knows, and therefore there could be no "accidental trans- 
position" of headlines. The article was intended as the 
principal sensation of that Sunday's issue. The headlines 
were in the largest type, and covered the entire width of 
the page. Subsequently a second edition was issued, in 
which the article in question was said to have been "culled 
from the lectures, writings, etc., of David Starr Jordan;" 
and still later a third edition was issued in which the arti- 
cle was attributed to Edgar Saltus. It is needless to 
say that there are no writings of Dr. Jordan in existence 
expressive of the brutal ideas in regard to women that 
were attributed to him. 



BRITISH SEIZURES AT DELAGOA BAY. 

THE State Department at Washington has caused 
Ambassador Choate to make enquiries of the British 
Government as to the meaning of its conduct in seizing 
certain American vessels in Delagoa Bay, and for a state- 
ment of its future purposes. Three ships (not thirty, as 
the Anglo-phobia journals have it) were seized by a Brit- 
ish sloop of war and taken to Port Elizabeth. Tbey hailed 
from the port of New York, and their cargoes consisted 
of flour, beef, beer and lard. That these commodities would 
have ultimately found their way into the Boer camp no- 
body doubts. That the Boers are in the greatest need of 
just such provisions is known. To shut off their supplies 
is naturally a very tempting enterprise to England. The 
question arises as to her rights in the premises. It so 
happens that we have a treaty with Great Britain cover- 
ing the point thus raised. After reciting the difficulty of 



deciding when provisions and other articles might become 
iband of war. I the treaty 

goes on to provide that "It is furtl.. that when- 

*ucb artic'' . iband shall for 

that reason be seized, the some shall not be confiscated, 
but the owners thereof shall be speedily and completely 
indemnified, and the captors, or in their default the gov- 
ernment under which they act, shall pay to the masters or 
owners of such vessels the full value of all such articles, 
with a reasonable mercantile profit thereon, together 
with the freight and demurrage incident to such deten- 
tion." It is therefore obvious that when England shall 
have thus compensated the owners of the vessels seized, 
she will have acted entirely within her treaty rights, and 
the United States will have no cause of complaint. So 
much for the startling bug-a-boo certain of the dailies 
have raised about the existence of a cntun belli calling for 
reprisals. There will be no trouble over those seizures. 
Great Britain, no doubt, intended from the first to pay 
the bill of costs. She secures the provisions for her own 
use, and has prevented their reaching the Boers. We 
think she has a deeper purpose in raising the question as 
to when provisions become contraband of war, and we 
think that both Germany and the United States are help- 
ing to work out that purpose. If the decision be appar- 
ently forced upon her that provisions shipped from a 
neutral port can never be deemed contraband, one of the 
greatest of her future difficulties will be solved, as well as 
one of ours. In case of England being involved in a 
European war, she will be able to get our food stuffs, and 
we shall retain her market. See? 

THREATENING THE BEAR. 

JAMES R. KEENE now of New York, but erstwhile of 
San Francisco, is daily in receipt of an avalanche of 
letters threatening his life. His recent desperate 
"slaughter of the innocents" on the New York Stock 
Market is the cause of the enmity felt towards him. Most 
of the writers of the sanguinary epistles he receives claim 
to have been utterly ruined by his bearish assaults upon 
"the whole list." Mr. Keene did not confine his attention 
to the higher priced, and more stable stocks, but raided 
the smaller mercantile, and industrial companies without 
mercy. The result was to crush many men of moderate 
means engaged in ligitimate enterprises calculated to in- 
crease the trade of the country. That they should feel 
bitter towards him is 'not at all surprising. We do not 
imagine, however, that Mr. Keene is in much danger of 
being shot. Men who really mean that sort of thing do it, 
and waste no time in writing long epistolary communi- 
cations. The threatening letters will not be without their 
use, if they succeed in attracting attention to certain 
abuses on the stock market that need regulating by law. 
"Short sales" should be strictly enjoined by statute. No 
man should be allowed to sell what he has not got, and 
especially so, when his sales are intended to artificially 
increase the supply with a view to ruin the legitimate 
dealer. The law takes cognizance of the smaller gambling 
games, and prohibits them. It ignores the other, larger, 
and more pernicious gamble on the Stock Exchange. 
Buying and selling shares in tangible enterprises is a per- 
fectly ligitimate business, if ligitimately conducted. But 
the sales should be actual and not constructive. There 
should be an absolute delivery of the goods sold, and a 
real identification of the same, by giving the registered 
numbers of the stock. In ordinary business a man can 
only recover on "goods sold and delivered." Why should 
the stock business be made an exception to the rule, and 
exempted from the only requirement by which trade can 
be made real and not fictitious? When a parcel of land is 
sold there has got to be a "putting in possession," and 
the delivery of a title descriptive of its meets and bounds. 
Otherwise the sale is off, and the purchaser is entitled to 
damages. That is the practice and the law. Why should 
not a similar "custom of trade" prevail in regard to the 
business of stock dealing? The existing evil is one of 
enormous proportions, and, by reason of its fertility in be- 
getting panics, is a menace and a danger to the whole 
country. The remedy is obvious, and it says little for our 
lawmakers that they have not long since applied it. 
Meanwhile, the taking off of a bear or two might move 
them to action. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 6, 1900. 



"THE BEAUTY OF MEN." 

UNDER the above title are two columns of celebration 
for the male person by Mary Wager-Fisher in the 
holiday number of The Woman's Home Companion, a 
monthly publication that looks and sounds so much like The 
Ladies' Home Journal that spinsters cry for it, epicene 
youths read it secretly in their closets, and strong men 
run. As in Mr. Bok's Ladies' Home Journal, so in The 
Woman's Home Companion will you find heart-to-heart 
talks about pimples and freckles, how to be cheerful on 
five dollars a week, how to dine without swallowing your 
knife, how to make suet pudding and play ragtime on the 
autoharp, and where and when and what to marry. Mr. 
Bok is still the Lydla Pinkham of journalism, but Miss 
Mary Wager-Fisher of The Woman's Home Companion is 
running him a dangerous second. "Is it true," she quer- 
ies, "that women possess beauty in larger measure than 
do men, or even in as large measure? " And then Miss 
Mary proceeds to answer herself with a strenuous "No I " 
" I was," confesses Mary, "but yesterday in an assem- 
blage of cultivated aDd fashionable people, where a modest 
gentleman, apparently unconscious to himself, was the 
cynosure of all beauty-loving eyes. To describe him may 
be as hazardous as to paint the features of the immortal 
Helen." But Mary makes a try, anyway; and here it is: 
" Picture to your mind's eye a man of medium height, of 
slight, but sinewy build, with an intellectual face of strong 
but delicate outlines, flashing black eyes, mustache and 
hair nearly white, and his body clad in garments of such 
perfect cut aud fitness to the wearer that every draping 
fold of his cape coat, the fit of glove and shoes, the polish 
and hang of his eye glasses upon his breast, and the one 
touch of color in the red boutonnier, and you have what 
constitutes a strikingly handsome presence, beside which 
any one of the two hundred women present, if placed in 
rivalry, would have suffered instant defeat." 

Holy Laura Jean! think of the romantic shop girls, 
typewriters and manicures that will read this amorous 
description of flesh, cloth, leather and eyeglass, and weep 
their hearts away that the original is not theirs I To de- 
scribe him, Mary, was indeed "as hazardous as to paint 
the picture of the immortal Helen." 

Not content with booming the beauty of one sex, Miss 
Wager-Fisher goes on to tartly disparage the other. 
Woman, it would appear, is well dressed and good to look 
upon only when she wears man's clothes — "his plain felt 
hat, his shoes and haberdashery, his coat and vest" — and 
his something else, we suppose; but here Mary's essay 
comes to a discreet period. According to this passionate 
man-fancier, "men eat more, digest their food better, and 
are better nourished;" moreover "they are healthier, 
their bodies are more natural, and — heaven save the mark 
— they are cleaner, and they change their linen oftener." 
After reading Mary'e contribution to the Woman's Home 
Companion, no man can help but feel that his sex is the 
right one, that an artistic God knew his business when he 
made man first and a Messiah afterward in man's image. 
No woman can read Mary's burning words without feeling 
the shame of her own unworth, hideousness and soap-and- 
clean-linenlessness. Had Mary written for The Ladies' 
Home Journal, we would have had no trouble in locating 
her particular man beautiful. But who is the Mr. Lydia 
Pinkham of The Woman's Home Companion? His name 
is not revealed in any of the columns of the paper. 

THE GIVING OUT OF POLICE NEWS. 

THE duties of the new Police Commissioners, properly 
performed, will require the exercise of eternal vigi- 
lance on their part. One of the most important matters, 
to which early attention should be given, is that of fram- 
ing a set of hard and fast rules regulating the giving out 
of the news of the department. This is a more important 
matter than at first meets the eye. The police, and not 
the reporters, are practically the news gatherers of the 
city. In one way or another they come into possession of 
a vast amount of information which the readers of daily 
journalism like to have spread before them. Much of this 
information, such as that relating to the commission of 
serious crimes, is of a public nature, and should be given 
to the press for public use. But it should be given to all 
alike, without fear, favor or affection, and it should be so 
ordered by the strict rules of the department, from which 



no departure should be tolerated. By making fish of one, 
and flesh of another, it is entirely within the power of the 
police to make or break the solidest of our dailies. Such 
things have happened ere now. Hence we see much un- 
seemly jealousy between the dailies as to which should 
wield the most influence in electing the new Chief of Police. 
Should one newspaper, to the exclusion of all others, se- 
cure a monopoly of that officer's favors, it would be as 
good as a fortune to it. The legitimate news of the Police 
Department should be the personal perquisite of no one 
man, to be given to one newspaper and withheld from 
another, or sold to the highest bidder. There should be 
no secret news bureau in the "upper office," where 
"items" can be given out for favors, or for coin, or other 
questionable considerations. It is for the good of the city 
that the press and the police should hold perfectly inde- 
pendent relations towards each other. Experience has 
shown that in nearly all our large cities that the police 
have a peculiar aptitude for entering upon ways that are 
dark and tricks that are vain, and experience equally 
shows that it is the press alone that can set these things 
right. For time out of mind the press of this city was 
asleep in regard to such matters, and because it feared 
the loss of police news. It should never be put into such 
a position again. 

THE CAPE TO CAIRO RAILROAD. 

NOT long since, Rudyard Kipling, speaking of Cecil 
Rhodes, said, "He is the greatest man I ever met." 
Whether this is a just estimate or not, there can be no 
doubt that Mr. Rhodes has great qualities. He has a 
vivid imagination, a quality that lies behind all creative 
work. He has the power to weld together and turn to 
his own uses the hopes and activities of other men. He 
has, indeed, many of the gifts of genius, and English and 
American capitalists need to be careful if he does not 
sweep them off their feet during the coming months suc- 
ceeding the final settlement of the Boer difficulty. Rhodes' 
project is nothing less than to build a railroad to parallel 
the Indian Ocean and the Red Sea; a railroad 5,600 miles 
long; a railroad for at least a fourth of its distance close 
alongside navigable waters; a railroad which will run for 
half its distance through a country thinly peopled by a 
scanty population of barbarians, for another quarter of 
the distance by a sparsely inhabited country of stark 
naked savages, and finally a railroad which for three- 
fifths of its length will run through a country in which but 
few white men can live because of fevers. When we say 
a railroad 5,600 miles long, we do not realize what that 
means until we stop and make a comparison. From New 
York to San Francisco is only 3,266 miles. Mr. Rhodes' 
railway, parallel to an ocean highway, through a country 
of savages and fever, will be forty-one per cent, longer. 
We see not only a British line of railroad from Alexandria 
to the Cape of Good Hope, but we see laterals plunging 
in from the eastern coasts; then a great east and west 
line from the Red Sea. across Eardofan and Darfur and 
Wady to the British Niger territory, and other east and 
west lines across British Central Africa; and suddenly a 
whole vast continent, one of the divisions of the earth, is 
captured after a fierce struggle with ignorance, bigotry 
and cunning greed. Nothing so spectacular in history 
will have been done since the time of Alexander the 
Great. 

OF course no layman would assume to criticise the Su- 
preme Court. But for this circumstance a few re- 
marks might be made concerning the recent decision 
which grants Dora Fuhrig a new trial. The Fuhrig lady 
has a habit of killing representatives of her sex who fol- 
low an indiscretion by the second one of going to her for 
treatment. There is every reason for thinking that the 
Fuhrig graveyard is of imposing area. This female about 
whom the Supreme Court has thrown a loving arm, has 
often been accused, and her guilt made morally certain, 
but only once was she fairly pinned, and she got a whole- 
some sentence to the Pen. This has been annulled. It 
seems that certain evidence damaging to the prisoner was 
permitted to be introduced, an inadvertancy which the 
august tribunal makes haste to correct. If this, and all 
similar evidence, can only be excluded from the second 
trial, both Fuhrig and the Supreme Court will feel better. 




BANPRJ . i ill! 

The Best Malt Tonic. 



EVERYONE with experience of the great world will 
say that the possession of tact is above rubies to 
man or woman. The belle and beauty has often known a 
woman possessing neither to overshadow her simply be- 
cause of that nameless fascination which accompanies 
tact. Thus it is that the young lady whom social circles 
long ago dubbed "the queenly" rules her own coterie with 
great popularity, and in nothing has she shown the gift of 
tact more than in her "children's dinner," for the tastes 
of her guests were suited to perfection. Disguise it as 
we may, there is an air of tn/ontilhge predominant among 
our beaux, and to enable some of the belles who have seen 
service for several seasons to say with the poet, "Back- 
ward, turn oackward, oh Time in tby flight, make me a 
child again just for to-night," was a great inspiration. 
Think of how pat some of the characters were which were 
chosen by the guests. Fancy a well-known lawyer with a 
rattle! Could anything be more appropriate to his style? 
Then "sweet simplicity" so cleverly portrayed by a girl 
with a decade of experience. The list is too long to 
enumerate here, but all who saw the affair will recognize 
the truth of these remarks. 

• # * 

Slowly but surely the owners of great wealth in our 
midst are seeking the pastures new of New York and 
Washington. If Mrs. Eleanor Martin is induced to change 
her base as well as her name, what a serious loss it would 
be to our social world. Rumor is very busy with this esti- 
mable lady and charming hostess — it is to be hoped with- 
out foundation. 

* # # 

People are wondering why the wife of the young banker 
has so completely withdrawn from "the madding crowd" 
of the gay world. Some say a fit of pique induced 
by the severe criticism she underwent on the occa- 
sion of the elaborate breakfast she gave a celebrated 
artiste bad much to do with her withdrawal. Anyhow, 
her friends are more than charmed by a whisper which is 
going round that her hospitalities will be resumed in the 
new century. 

» # * 

A football cotillion is said to be the latest notion devel- 
oped by the young beau who is so noted for his prowess at 
that game. The maternals, however, do not look kindly 
on the idea, for gowns are apt to be damaged in a scrim- 
mage figure, and should Ed Greenway lead he might get 
roughly handled by those who owe him grudges. Green- 
way has more friends and fewer enemies than perhaps any 
other man in town, but even the few are not to be trifled 
with. 

THE JESTER. 

Life came before me as a clown 

Who labored in his chaffing 
Who forced a smile upon his lips 

And plagued me with his laughing. 
He shook a bauble in my eyes, 

In mirthless antics leaping, 
And cried "God's mercy 1 Let me jest 

Or break my heart with weeping I" 
W. A. I. 

To Cure La Grippe in Two Days. 
Take Laxative Bromo Quinine Tablets. All druggists refund the 
money if it fails to cure. B. W. Grove's signature is on each box. 25c. 

Every man has his own individual figure and style, and it is the 
duty of a good tailor to take this fact into account when building a 
suit of clothes. J. M. Litchfield & Co., of 12 Post street are one of 
the few tailoring firms in the city that positively refuse to turn out 
inartistic work. Their fabrics are the finest procurable, and only 
expert workmen are employed. 



One application of Smith's Dandruff Pomade stops itching scalp ; 
three to six applications removes all dandruff. Try it. Price 60 
cents, at all druggists. Sample free. Address Smith Brothers. 
Fresno, Oal. 

Sweae off with the New Year— that is to say swear off drinking 
dubious whiskies. The J. P. Cutter and Argonaut brands are 
whiskies for the wise. E. Martin & Co., 411 Market street, are sole 
agents for the United States. 




BURKE'S 



QUINNESS'S 



STOUT 



Gives Strength and Stamina 

Ask your dealer for Burke's. 
SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD, Importers, 

212-214 Market St., San Francisco. 



College San Rafael 



For Young Ladies 

Conducted by the Slaters of St. Domlnlo. 
Full collegto course of studies. A boarding school of highest 
grade. Superb modern building. Steam heated. Beautiful and 
commodious class rooms. Music and art rooms. 

Located in the lovely Magnolia Valley 
Unsurpassed for beauty and healthiulness. Address, 

Mother Superior 

College San Rafael, San Rafael, Cal. 

FRENCH LIBRARY AND FRENCH CLASSES 

This library is the most important of its kind, containing 20,000 books. 
Among them are the best ancient and latest authors. Under the auspices 
of the library are French classes for adults only, afternoons and evenings. 
Graduate teachers from France give tuition. Terms for library, $1 admission. 
50 cents monthly. Terms for classes — S3 a month, 2 lessons a week, entitling 
pupils to literary membership. Apply — French Library, City of Paris Build- 
ing, 135 Geary street. 

The Solly Walter School of Illustration 

In Pen and Ink. 

26 O'Farrell street 



The 



Osteopathic Institute 



9 to 12 
1 to 5 
7 to 8 

Dr. A. C. Moore; Dr. J. P. Haney; A. T. Moore, Secretary. 
Chronic Diseases and Deformities Successfully Treated. 



204 Sutter St., S. F. 



Phone Main 100. 



r^ i I I Is God's own re 

r^f^tnf^Cfipi Brlglrt's Disease 

I— 'V-'M IV^JVJU Detroit. Miehiiro 



Is God's own remedy for Diabetes and 
Phil. Porter, M. D. 
Detroit, Michigan. 



Louis Cahen & Son, Agents 



Send for pamphlet. 



Wholesale Liquor Dealers 
418 Sacramento street, S. F. 



Joseph Gillott's Steel Pens, 



THE AWARD AT 

CHICAGO, 1893 
Gold Medale Paris, 1878-1809. These pens are " the 
best in the world." Sole aeent for the United States, 
Me. Henry Hob, 91 John street, New York. 
Sold by all stationer,. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 6, 1900. 




" We obey no wand but Pleasure's.'*— Tom Moore. 

THE one novelty of the week was Mr. Frawley's pro- 
duction of With Flying Colors. It was an elaborate, 
painstaking production, in which time and money had fig- 
ured liberally; but the play, an obesely British melodrama 
from the Adelphi, was impossible to an audience of any 
intelligence. It cannot be said that Mr. Frawley's ven- 
ture was profitable from either an artistic or pecuniary 
point of view. In London they have not only the Adelphi, 
but a special Adelphi audience, whose appreciation and 
intelligence are on a level with this kind of drama, in 
which the scenery is the live thing and the actors are, so 
to say, painted in. We had in San Francisco a similar 
audience when Mr. Morosco ran melodrama at the Grand 
Opera House, but it is scattered and indifferent now. The 
most of the people who go to the California to see the 
Frawleys are refined, educated and normal; even a good 
melodrama they take with a grain of salt; but a prepos- 
terously bad one, such as this is, they receive with de- 
rision. The yellowest dime novels of our boyhood could 
not hope to cope with th's play in points of inanity and 
absurdity. With Flying Colors is preposterous, and as bad 
as most of the English melodramas are, something de- 
cidedly less than representative of them. The principal 
intrigue is concerned with a blackleg who has been dis- 
missed from the British Navy. A young man of fortune, 
a lieutenant in the navy, is to return home after an ab- 
sence of many years. The blackleg hastens to Southamp- 
ton, where he meets the home-comer in a hotel, shoots him 
dead, appropriates his clothes, including his uniform, pre- 
sumably, for in a later act you see this same blackleg on 
the quarter deck of one of Her Majesty's battle-ships, 
masquerading in the dead man's name and rank. Such 
schemes as this are handed out to you by the mile, with 
unapologetic trustfulness. A sane child of ten could not 
be brought to take them seriously. There is nothing 
clever, nothing plausible, nothing imaginative or exciting 
in With Flying Colors. It is simply an overgrown sample 
of stupid Adelphi melodrama, which the American thea- 
tre, crude as it is, would be better off without. 
* # * 

Mr. Frawley will quit melodrama for a time, and give us 
on Tuesday night The Princess and the Butterfly, a modern 
comedy of manners by Arthur Wing Pinero. The follow- 
ing is what one of the best Eastern critics has to say of 
the play: It has for its motto "Those who love deep never 
grow old," and tells a love story that is full of pathos and 
interest, with an added novelty of situation — particularly 
comforting to the passe man or woman — in showing how a 
woman of forty may happily wed a man of twenty-seven, 
and a man of forty-five may woo and win a girl of nine- 
teen. In a reflection of a certain phase of London life it 
is masterful. No better picture of the rich and vulgar 
class in society in the English metropolis has been given 
on the stage than the scene in which the parvenu St. 
Roche menage is shown, with its curious mixture of good, 
bad and indifferent and social elements. 

The Princess and the Butterfly, however, will raise no end 
of contention as to whether the two leading women of the 
play deserve the sympathy and admiration that Mr. 
Pinero feels for them. One is the Princess, a charming 
creature who has been bought and sold in the social mar- 
riage market at twenty, and who is only freed from her 
aged spouse when she is forty. At twenty she not only 
had beauty, but every quality of heart and mind to make 
her lovable and loving. At forty she is a widow, still 
handsome, and with all the world before her, but the 
utter loss of those twenty years and their attendant youth 



has preyed upon her until she is wretchedly morbid over 
the steady advance of time. Every pleasure that she has 
is eaten into by the knowledge that she is growing old. 
She dreads middle age as one might suffer under some 
constantly advancing inroad of some fatal disease. She is 
loved by a man whom she loves in return, but he is her 
junior by many years. It is the opening of the gates of 
happiness for her — but she sees the folly of it in the differ- 
ence of their ages, and turns her back on her youthful 
lover. 

It is not her first love affair. Before she married the 
old Prince, who is now dead, she had an affair in which 
she rejected a worthy man because of his and her poverty, 
in order that she might make a marriage de convenance. 
One cannot but pity the mature woman in the temptation 
held out to her; but does she, all things considered, de- 
serve our sympathy, and is such a marriage wise? Yes, 
says Mr. Pinero. And he expects you all to say yes, too. 
And to applaud her marriage to the young fellow, which 
occurs in the last act. 

The other young person whose marriage Mr. Pinero 
asks you to approve, is Fay Zuliani. She is the illegiti- 
mate daughter, or supposed to be, of the Princess' first 
lover, Rupert Lamorant. Fay's mother ran off after- 
wards with a 'cello player, Zuliani, and Rupert died. 
George Lamorant, Rupert's brother, makes the child an 
allowance, and the Zulianis take Fay around Europe, let- 
ting her lead a mad sort of life "in the choicest available 
gutters." Zuliani dies and George brings Fay to Eng- 
land, only to discover that the real Fay died as a baby, 
and that the real Fay was a substituted child in order 
that the Zulianis might keep on drawing George's allow- 
ance. George, nevertheless, has become interested in 
her, and keeps his secret from Fay until the end of the 
play, and then he falls in love with her and marries her. 



Fougere, the Frenchwoman, continues the bright par- 
ticular at the Orpheum in spite of the invasion by a lot of 
new talent. This is not to disparage the others as much as it 
is to praise Fougere, who is one of the few Parisian music 
hallists that have lived up to their advance notices. Her 
one obvious fault is overwork. She frequently strains to 
make a point. But her virtues are beyond enumeration. 
Above everything else, she has a real sense of humor — the 
rarest of qualities in woman of any nationality — and her 
good nature is warm and contagious. Mnst of her songs 
are in the dialect of the Paris music halls, and of course 
very naughty to those of the audience who do not under- 
stand the dialect — to the others they are whimsically 
funny without being half so rotten as the law allows a 
turn in a foreign tongue to be. Besides all this, Fougere 
is the most delightful of all the French assassins of rag- 
time. The new-comers include our old friend Billy Rice 
and a friend of his in a minstrel skit; the acrobatic 
Rozinos, who show one of the cleverest studies in per- 
spective ever seen on the stage in their billiard parlor set, 
and turn some wonderful turns on the table; Dorothy 
Drew, who kicks her own nose out of joint with effortless 
grace, and sings a bunch of taking songs; and Douglas 
and Ford, who sing and dance until further orders. The 
top-liners for next week's bill are the Elinore Sisters in a 
new sawed-off farce by the name of Dangerous Mrs. Delaney. 
The others are Frank Latona, the musical tramp; John 
and Nellie McCarthy in a sketch called A Wall Street 
Broker, and Charles A. Gardner, a Dutch dialectrician. 
# # # 

Chimmie Fadden finishes a fortnight at the Alcazar, 
with Sunday evening's performance, making way for Lu- 
cette Ryley's comedy, The Mysterious Mr. Bugle. The 
stock company will be reinforced by Irene Everett Hay- 
man, a San Francisco beauty, who left us some years ago 
with The Girl I Left Behind Me company. 



A musical event that promises to be of great impor- 
tance is the forthcoming concert of Emma Nevada, to be 
given in the California on Monday night. She needs no 
introduction to California. Nevada will be aided by Louis 
Blumenburg, a celloist of renown, and Selden Pratt, pian- 
ist. The programme has not been settled on in time for 
publication in this issue of the News Letter. 



January 6, 1900. 



S\\ II: \ 



Wllh p«al« of merriment, the holiday spectacle. 

ve<i at the T^ 
House by !arire audir -Significant fact whi. 

of th> ' the extraripaoia, is, that almost every 

evening patrons of the theatre visit the box office between 
the acta and secure seats for another performance. Com- 
mencinif with next Monday evening, the third week of 
Litth I ill be marked by the introduction of new 

songs, jokes, dances and ballets. The gorgeousness of 
the stage settings, costumes, and the ballets and trans- 
formation are the source of so much pleasure to young and 
old, that the extravaganza is likely to be kept on the bill 
for weeks more. Following the extravaganza will be 
Frank Daniel's greatest success, The IdoVt A'v, with the 
original "hoot mon" in the cast. 



The final performance of Hall Caine's The Christian, at 
the Columbia, will take place next Saturday evening, Jan- 
uary 13th, and from all appearances the few remaining 
performances will be all too limited for the accommodation 
of the thousands who desire to see the sensational success 
of several years. 

On Monday night. January 15th, the Louis James, Kath- 
ryn Kidder, Charles B. Hanford combination will come to 
the Columbia Theatre for a limited season. The engage- 
ment will open with their sumptuous revival of The Wm- 
Irr't Tnlf, a Shakesperian work that has not been seen 
here in years. Mr. James will be the Autolycus, while 
Mr. Hanford will be the King Leontes. Miss Kidder will 
be seen in the dual role of Hermione and Perdita. Wag- 
enbals and Kemper have, it is said, given the comedy one 
of the finest settings of any Shakesperian revival in recent 

years. 

* # » 

The first of the series of five symphony concerts, by 
Henry Holmes and an orchestra of 66, will be given in the 
Grand Opera House on the afternoon of Thursday, Janu- 
ary 18th. at 3:15 sharp. There was a long and lasting 
line at Sherman & Clay's when the sale of seats opened on 
Thursday last that bodes a big attendance. 

THE peremptory money-raising sale that was started 
by J. J. O'Brien & Co., the dry-goods merchants, in 
the latter part of the year 1899 has been continued with 
success into the year 1900. The big stock has been added 
to from time to time, as the holiday trade has depleted it, 
and now there is on hand as fine a selection of women's and 
children's suits, waists, wraps, underwear, hosiery, and 
dress materials and furnishings as is to be found in the 
United States. No matter how great the crowd you are 
sure of polite attention at J. J. O'Brien's. The prices 
during this sale are sensationally low. 

THERE is Kona coffee and Kona coffee, but the real, 
exquisite berry is put up by Geo. W. Casweil & Com- 
pany at 312 Sacramento street. A cup of Caswell's Kona 
is noted for its amber brown color and delightful aroma. 
It is a pure, palatable coffee, that finds favor with both 
housewives and epicures. Be sure the name of Geo. W. 
Caswell is on the package. 

A fine assortment of new art goods is being displayed for the holi- 
days in the art rooms of William Morris, 248 Sntter street. These 
include paintings in oils and water colors, pastels, engravings, 
etchings and fancy prints. Frames and the materials for making 
them are to be seen in great variety, and in the gallery there is a 
picture show that will appeal to all lovers of art. 

Exclusive chinaware, spotless napery, faultless attention and 
superb cooking are specialties of Swain's Bakery. There are to be 
found in this famous restaurant— a landmark in San Francisco for 
twenty years— the elegance, simplicity, and homelike quiet that are 
appreciated by well-bred people. Orders are taken for breads, pas- 
tries, chicken sandwiches, etc. 



When the morning's work has given you a razor-edged appetite, a 
good place to lose it is the Grand Hotel Caffi, which is newly reno- 
vated, and whose proprietors, Fay & Foster, make a specialty of 
merchants' luncheon from 11 to 2. 



After the play is over go where the fashionable crash goes, to the 
Cafe Zinkand, where the bestbeers, wines and suppers are to be had 
with a musical accompaniment by Stark's famous orchestra of 
strings. 



aiiTornia i neatre. > 

TH= PRINCESS AND THE BUTTERFLY. 

Tnr I 

In Preparation: thf. Bum or Makti 

California Theatre- Extra- RSABJ 

Rngagoiuenl extraordinary. Monday erentriv, Jaooai 
Wodnoaday matinee. January UMh« 

EMMA NEVADA 

Mid :v— M-iini: aritflta, Including Loun DHJWimm. "owlllrt. ami 

> v i-i: m r. plants*. 
s, -ut*. noa ..ri sale: 83.00. ftLOO, 11.00. 

G-|..„L' TL rt _l M OoTTLon. Marx A Co., 

oiumDia i neatre. i-c«cc« «nd Manican. 

Beginning next Monday, last sii nights and Saturday mattnae' 
LleMer A Oo. present Hall < Mne's powerful play, 



THE CHRISTIAN. 

Last performance Saturday night, January 18th. 

Holiday, Jan, LBtb; Jamkb- Kippkb-Haitfobd Tkiumvikatk. 

Fred Belasco, Lessee. Mark Thall 
Main 254, 

Week of January 6th. Special engagement o! MtSA Irene Everett, 

when will be produced Lueette Ryley's 



fi I — — , - - TL ft ^l ^ n Fred Belabco. I 

Alcazar I neatre. Manager, phone 



MYSTERIOUS MR. BUGLE 



Regular matinee Saturday and Sunday. 
Next week: Lady Windermkkk's Fan. 
Alcazar Prices— 15c, 25c., 35c., 50c. 



T' /rt |! f"\__,, . I— i -». .«« Mrs - Ernestine Krkling. 
IVOll Upera MOUSe. Proprietor and Manager. 

We are sold out nightly] Third week, commencing; January 8th, 
of the gorgeous holiday extravaganza, 

LITTLE BO-PEEP. 

Every evening and .Saturday matinee. New songs, ballets, jokes, 
dances, etc. The great play for the children. 
Popclar Prices— -250. and 50o. Telephone for seats. Bush 9. 
Next Production: Frank Daniel 'h greatest success, Tbe Idol's 

EYK. 

Grand Opera Mouse-Special. 

Thursday afternoons, January 18th, February 1st and 15th, and 
March 1st and 15th, at 3:15 o'clock, 

FIVE SYMPHONY CONCERTS 

Under the direction of Henry Holmes. Orchestra of G6 pieces. 

Subscription price for series : 85. 84, 83, 82, and 81. 

Sale opens at Sherman Clay Co.'s Thursday, Jan. 1th, at 9 a. m„ 

and closes Thursday, Jan. 11th, at 5 p. in. 

Seats for single concert, 81.50, 8l, 75c„ 50c, and 25c. 

1 _ „, San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. 

I P R e U m . O'Farrell St.. between Stockton and Powell streets. 



Fnmk Latona 
Charles A. Gardner 



John and Nellie McCarthy 
The Rosin os 



ELINORE SISTERS 



Billy Rice and II. W. Frillinan 
Thome & Carleton 



Dorothy Drew 
Fougere 

Reserved Seats 25c: balcony 10c; opera chairs and box seats 50c. 

Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 

\ A / i T" r r\ J_ ' (Incorporated.) Mem- 

western I urt Association, uer American Turf 

Congress. 

TANFORAN PARK, 

Third Meeting. dAN. 1st TO cJAIN. 20th, 1900 INCLUSIVE 

Six high-class running races every week dtly, rain or shine, beginning 
at 1:30 p. m. The ideal winter race track of America, Patrons step directly 
from the railroad ears into a superb grand stand, glass enclosed, where com- 
fortably housed in bad weather they can enjoy an unobstructed view of the 
races. 

Trains leave Third and Townsend streets at 9:00, 10:40, and 11:30 a. m.; and 
12:15, 12:35, 12:50, 1;25 p.m., returning immediately after last race and at 4:45 
p. m. Rear cars reserved for women and their escorts. No smoking. Valen- 
cia street ten minutes later. San Jose and Wa> Stations— Arrive at San 
Bruno at 12:45 p, in.; leave San Bruno at 4:00 and 4:45 p. m. Rates-San 
Francisco to Tanforan and return, including admission to track, 81.25. 
W. J. Martin, President. F. H. Green, Secretary an d Manager. 

After the Theatre 

Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to Stark's matchless string band and enjoy the flnest 
wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand is society's gathering place after the show is 
oven. . 

Dr. Charles W. Decker, Dentist 



Phelan Building Rooms 6, 8. 10. 



Entrance TOG Market street 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 6, 1900. 




Moods and A little over a year ago Dr. Edward Robe- 
Other Verses, son Taylor gained recognition by a most 
painstaking and very successful attempt 
to give to the English-speaking world a satisfactory Eng- 
lish version of Jose-Maria de Heredia's wonderful sonnets. 
A new volume of poems from the pen of this California 
author is receiving much attention. "Moods and Other 
Verses" show not only lyrical skill but are instinct with 
deep feeling, which gives to them a vital charm. Much of 
the verse is of a high order and full of uplifting power. 
It will survive because it is spontaneous and reveals deli- 
cate poetic impulse and fancy. The first part of the 
volume, "Moods," consists of some forty or more bits of 
verse, many of them in sonnet form. Of these the one en- 
titled "Concentration" is especially fine, and reads as fol- 
lows: 

" Mark how the florist's cunning hand compels 
That weed unique, the strange chrysanthemum, 
To crown one lonely stalk whose blossomed sum 
To giant size and gorgeous beauty swells— 
The forces pulsing in its myriad cells 

Concentrating all their magic and their power 
To build the structure of a single flower, 
Wherein the plant in dazzling triumph tells. 
So shouldst thou have the will, O struggling soul, 
To hold thy thoughts and actions to the pole 
Of one imperious, exclusive aim; 
Then may thy stalk a wondrous blossom bear, 
Which shall for thee achievement's glory wear, 
And be to others as a sign of flame." 

"Attainment," "Beatitude," and "Adversity," are equally 
good, and will bear reading more than once. There are, 
besides, poems on nature, poems in praise of great authors 
and great men, tributes to friends, a collection of In Me- 
moriam verses full of pathos, and many translations from 
the French and German. From theopening "Dedication" 
to the closing "Benediction" — both replete with tender 
sentiment — the book shows conscientious work of a grade 
much above the average. It is simply and artistically 
bound. With its blue-gray cover, its fine type, its heavy 
paper, and broad margined pages, it reflects credit upon 
its publishers. 

Moods and Other Verses: by Edward Robeson Taylor. D.P.Elder and 
Morean Shepard, Publishers, San Francisco. Price, 81.25. 



Janice Meredith. 



Mr. Paul Leicester Ford's new historical 



romance, "Janice Meredith," during its 
brief two months of existence, has gone 
quite ahead of the record of the same length of time of 
any other piece of fiction, and notwithstanding the fact 
that the book first ran as a serial in two publications that 
appeal to widely different classes of the reading public, it 
is now selling in its 130th thousand, and recently its aver- 
age sales, it is said, were 2500 copies a day. That the 
novel has enduring value as a well drawn picture of life 
in colonial days, and that the people and the period are 
placed before the reader with painstaking historical pre- 
cision one cannot deny. The plot, however, sometimes 
lacks continuity, and Janice, with her pretty face and fool- 
ish fancies, pledging herself to two or three men at once, 
without caring the least little bit for any one of them, is 
scarcely the ideal heroine for "the great American histori- 
cal novel, " which Mr. Ford's many admirers claim that he is 
so well qualified to write. The opening pages of the story 
have for background a loyalist farm in New Jersey in the 
year 1774, where Janice, the daughter of a stubborn Tory 
squire, is living. The hero, whose character is based on 
that of Alexander Hamilton, comes to America as an in- 
dentured servant, for reasons of his own, is bonded to the 
squire, falls in love with Janice, and joins the American 
forces. Later on he becomes an aide to Washington, but 
betrays the General's trust all for love of Janice, and to 



save her father's life; and his resignation from the Gen- 
eral's staff is demanded. Eventually he wins the maid, 
and this daughter of a loyalist gives her heart to the 
Englishman fighting under the American flag. But it is 
not so much for the plot nor the characters that the book 
will be remembered, as for its simple yet forceful manner 
of placing before the reader's mental vision the condition 
of the people during those Revolutionary days and the 
almost insurmountable difficulties under which Washington 
struggled — disaffection and often treachery all about him, 
and with only a handful of raw troops with which to face 
thirty thousand regulars. From Manhattan Island to the 
surrender at Yorktown the story of the war for Inde- 
pendence is clearly and convincingly told by Mr. Ford, and 
told in a masterful manner. It leaves behind a most satisfy- 
ing impression and one that cannot fail to be a lasting one. 

Janice Meredith: by Paul Leicester Ford. Dodd, Mead & Co., Publishers, 
New York. Price. 81.50. 

The Log of a It is the actual experience of his first four 
Sea-Waif, years at sea — from the age of twelve to 
sixteen — that Mr. Frank T. Bullen, the au- 
thor of "The Cruise of the Cachalot" and " Idylls of the 
Sea," presents in his new book, "The Log of a Sea-Waif." 
It tells of voyages made to the West Indies, to Bombay, 
to Rangoon, Melbourne, and to the Coromondel Coast. 
For fifteen years a sea-farer in almost every capacity ex- 
cept that of a master, Mr. Bullen's pictures of life at sea 
in the forecastle are drawn from the seaman's actual life, 
many things being set down just as they occurred, which 
fact gives to them the interest of a human document. The 
opening chapter is entitled "My First Ship," and that and 
all the succeeding ones are the records of strange sights, 
experiences, and vicissitudes of a nature to dampen the 
ardor of the many boys who are always clamoring for sea- 
life. It is an English companion to our own "Two Years 
Before the Mast," which has so long held sway as a classic 
upon the subject. 

The Log of a Sea-Waif: by Frank T. Bullen. D. Appleton & Co., Pub- 
lishers. New York. Price, 81.50. 

The Iron Mr. and Mrs. John Preston True, respectively 
St ar . as author and illustrator, have furnished a new 
wonder story for boys and girls. The aim of 
"The Iron Star," as the book is called, is to give children 
a series of historical stories so connected as to suggest 
the growth of civilization from the times of the Cave Men 
down through the Stone, Bronze and Iron Ages to the 
days of Miles Standish. This, with the hope that by thus 
bridging the gap between myth and history, the childish 
mind may be awakened to a taste for historical reading. 
The iron star is a fragment of a meteorite, which it is as- 
sumed has been handed down from father to son for un- 
numbered generations. The family chronicles beginning in 
myth and ending in history, tell the story of what it saw 
on its journey through the ages. There are fifteen full- 
page illustrations, and the book is one in which many a 
mother will find pleasure as well as the children at her 
knee. 

The Iron Star: by John Preston True. Little, Brown & Co., Publishers, 
Boston. Price. 81.50. 



BOOKS BECEIVED. 

The Macmillan Co.: "Child Life in Colonial Days." by Alice Morse 
Earle, Price, $2.50; "Nature Pictures by American Poets," edited by 
Annie Russell Marble, Price, $1.25; "Drake and His Yeomen," by 
James Barnes. 

Small, Maynard & Co.: "In Case of Need, "by Ralph Bergengren, 
Price, $1,25; 'An Alphabet of Celebrities," by Oliver Herford. 

Little, Brown & Co.: "In Ghostly Japan," by Lefcadio Hearn, 
Price, $2. 

D. Appleton & Co,: "The White Terror," by Felix Gras, Price, 
$1.50. 

Cassell&Co., Limited: "Twelfth Night," by Wm. Shakespeare 
(Cassell's National Library) Price. 10 cents. 

Wm. Doxey: "Mandelay," by Rudyard Kipling, (Lark Edition), 
Price 75 cents. 

The Champlin Press: "The Honey Jar," Vol. Ill, No. 1. Price, 
5 cents. 

R. F. Fenno & Co.: "Luther Strong," by Thomas J. Vivian, 
Price, $1.25. 

Harper & Bros. : "Briton and Boer," Reprinted by permission from 
The North American Review. Price, $1.25. M. E. B. 



PARKER'S COUGH CURE. 
A Sovereign Remedy. One dose will stop a congh. It never fails. 
Try it. Price, 25 cents. Geobqe Dahlbendeb & Co., 214 Kearny 
street. For sale by all druggists. 



January 6, 1900. 







' Hew lbs Crtcr I" " What Ihe devil »n thou • ' 
"On« thai will i<lw lb* drill. .It. with ran." 



w 



II KKK be those russet Tclvcleens, 
That erstwhile Hulkcloy wi.rc. 
Those stripes that graced fair Bnlkeley's jeans 

And pleased us much of yore T 
That clang to Bulkcley'o spindle shins. 
Amusing us of fon, 

Tell. Uulkeley, tell what sorcery 

Has snatched them from our sight? 

Hast chucked them cruelly in the sack 
Tbat is the rag-bag higbt? 

That doleful realm of used-to-was, 
That is the rag-bag bight ! 

" There dances at the Opera Grand" 

Fair Bulkeley he would say, 
'■ A supple nymph with silken hose, 

Whom men call Coryphee— 
A nymph of kicks and angel smiles, 

Whom men call Coryphee. 

" And she has done this thing to me," 

Fair Bulkeley he would say, 
" Has stripped me of my velveteens — 

Designing Coryphee! 
And I must wear my trousers plain, 

Or none of Coryphee." 

GOOD people, advertise your wants in the News Let- 
ter, the Czar of the weeklies. The rates may be a 
bit higher than those of the cheap dailies, but it will take 
fewer insertions and you will get quicker returns. In 
this very column last week I offered a reward for the re- 
covery of Colonel John P. Irish, dead or alive, with or 
without a necktie. And the very next day who should 
turn up in red ink in the supplement of the Call, but the 
same long-lost John P. Whether the Colonel was his own 
Columbus, or discovered by the editors of Mr. Spreckels' 
newspaper, I am not in a position to decide. But here he 
is in the quick, writing at the top of bis voice about "The 
Wonderful Progress of the Nineteenth Century." And all 
through a little paragraph in the News Letter. The 
Crier's order on Raphael's for a suit of all- cotton, muci- 
lage-seamed clothes awaits the lucky finder. 

FICKLENESS, thy name is The Call. It is not so many 
months since Mr. Spreckels' editors were stink-potting 
Mr. Lees, then Chief of Police. Now that Lees has been 
permitted to retire in favor of a man who may possibly 
reward the rival newspaper that got him his position with 
a few "scoops," The Call discovers to its readers that 
Lees is a beauty for management and a wonder for work, 
that, thanks to him, the police department of San Fran- 
cisco "is the rival of any of the great departments of the 
world." A little bird tells the Crier that when the ex- 
Chief read this account of himself, he wept vitriolic tears 
and said: "This is the hardest blow of all. To think that 
after my years of honorable service I have to retire to the 
obscene accompaniment of a puff in The Call." 

THE scandal of the decrepit old troopship Manuense 
has again been revived. Colonel Pettit, of the 31st 
Regiment, claims that his soldiers saved the leaky tub by 
bailing her out, and consequently demands pay for their 
services. This is the most original idea ever evolved by a 
military brain. Fancy men requiring payment for saving 
their own lives. The passengers on a shipwrecked vessel 
might as well call on the Life Saving service to reward 
them for the trouble of getting rescued. Next time the 
Crier dodges a trolley car he is going to enter a claim for 
compensation for the extra exertion involved in saving his 
own life. 

WHAT has the week brought forth ? Two divorces and 
a breach of promise case, wherein the principals have 
reached the age when wigs and artificial molars are a nec- 
essary adjunct to their beauty, and where they ought, in 
all conscience, to be adjusting the matrimonial infelicities 
of their grandchildren. And yet there are some who say 
that Cupid ravages only the hearts of the young ! 



MANY 
mm 
'hP d .r.narv Ut 

Mars DCtpaJ trili 

jags, hollering, jostling, besmudging 01 with 

burnl ring horns and taking hon voting 

woman of a party of four that occupied a can 
to attract enough attention oy lung power, so she separ- 
ated herself from her petticoat, blood red silk affair, and 
out of the carriage window she waved it as a flag, while 
the crowds rattled the very telegraph wires with their 
cheers. It would have been a^ easy to take the census as 
to have counted the sore heads of the next morning. But 
for all the horseplay and boozing the crowd was good- 
natured. Not a single citizen was killed, and up to date 
not a single divorce case has found its grounds in that wild 
New Year's eve, of which the only notably sober member 
of the late stayers was yours truly. 

IF the contention of J. Harry Scott be correct, and a 
man's residence is determined by the location of his 
dress suit case, does that convert into lodging-houses pop- 
ular establishments where the Tuxedo or the clawhammer 
mav b? hired? Suppose, after a hard night, one of the 
gilded youth should leave his dress suit case with his 
"uncle," would his residence, then, be at the sign of the 
Three Golden Balls? Mr. Scott has thrown a great prob- 
lem into the field of society. The many arguments whioh 
the problem may call forth are wearisome even in con- 
templation. Suppose J. Harry had borrowed another fel- 
low's dress suit case, and hired a dress suit, would the 
owner of the case be entitled to vote for him for Tax Col- 
lector? Suppose he lost the case, and soaked the suit, 
would that But, hold, enough! Mr. Scott should re- 
turn to San Jose and repent. 

THAT story in the dailies about the Oakland girl at- 
tempting suicide because her mother would not let 
her go to the theatre is all wrong. Her mother did let her 
go. The Crier refuses to mention the name of the par- 
ticular show, because almost any other that has been seen 
hereabout lately would have affected this sensitive young 
woman in just the same way. However, this custom of 
suiciding off the ferry boats ought to be discouraged. It 
delays traffic, interferes with the tamale orchestra, and 
keeps the Oakland husband away from home 0' nights. 
The lobby of the theatre is the proper place for this sort 
of thing. Then to find out just how bad a performance is, 
the dramatic critic has only to stay out in front and count 
corpses. 

LONG hours I've sat since New Year's Pay, 
My features drawn with pain, 
I've added and I've multiplied 
And canceled, but in vain. 

With no effect I scratched my head 

Until my hair is thin, 
For— woe is me ! — I cannot find 

What century I'm in. 

THE worst feature of this "home study" business that 
is agitating the Board of Education is that the young 
hopefuls, poring over their books and problems are apt to 
ask questions of their parents that are difficult if not im- 
possible to answer. The world do move, and it is a wise 
father who could pass the slimmest kind of civil service ex- 
amination in these modern days with his offspring cast 
for examiners. There are times, reader, when your Crier 
does not regret that he is childless. 

UNDER appropriate headlines comes the tale that 
Judge Coffey has been kissed in court by a blushing 
bride upon whom he had just performed the marriage cer- 
emony. Has the misogynic jurist undergone a change of 
heart, or was it a case of Hobson's choice with the well 
advertised Schopenhauer of the Probate Court? 

I HOPE that the fat ladies of the stage who are bunting 
for free advertising will not attempt to duplicate the 
feat of the young woman at the Orpheum, who celebrated 
New Year's Day by kicking ber nose out of joint. 

TWO more actors have reformed. Mr. James Corbett 
of Hayes Valley and Mr. James Jeffries of Los An- 
geles have been reconverted to the prize-ring. After all, 
the ring gives them longer speaking parts. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 6, 1900. 



^rksfe.Bo. 



IT was at a recent art exhibition. They were looking at 
the pictures and telling one another confidentially how 
bad they were. Occasionally they would pause in front of 
a canvas and go into raptures over its artistic beauties. 
They stopped thus three times. You see there were 
three of them, and each had a painting in the show. 

"It's a wonderful thing," said Joullin, "how realistically 
one may present nature." 

His companions bowed solemnly. They understood. 

"Now, you know," Joullin continued, "I went in for still 
life a great deal. not long ago." 

"Yes," we know; d ed still life," muttered one of 

the others. 

"Well, when I was doing this still life business," Joullin 
resumed, " I got a job to paint a house; not a house paint- 
er's job, you understand, but the portrayal on the canvas 
of a fine country mansion in the midst of a great park. It 
was a sort of combination landscape and still life. The 
entrance gate was a massive affair with great marble pil- 
lars. Well, gentlemen, I painted those marble pillars so 
realistically that they were actually cold to the touch. 
The owner was charmed. He insisted on having a sepa- 
rate panel of the great gate. I turned it out. He took 
the canvas and started home with it. While crossing the 
bay he was jostled on the boat and the canvas was 
knocked out of his hand and fell overboard. Well, if you 
believe me, that marble gate was painted so realistically 
the canvas sank like a stone." 

Then C. D. Robinson went to the front and center. 

"Talking of realistic work," he said, "reminds me of a 
landscape I did once. It may be called an icescape, for it 
was a scene displaying the glories of aurora borealis. I 
was charmed with it. Well, sir, that icescape was so 
true to nature that when I hung my thermometer on the 
canvas the mercury went down to 30 degrees below 
zero." 

The others turned up their collars and hurriedly ordered 
hot Scotches. 

Then up spoke Greenbaum, the third man of the group. 

"You know," he said, "I sometimes do portraits. Well, 
some time ago, I painted the portrait of a well known 
man. He was greatly pleased with it, and paid me well. 
It really was a great work. That canvas was more than 
what is termed a speaking likeness. It was the man him- 
self. The gleam of intelligence was in the eyes; the blood 
could almost be seen mantling in the cheeks; the lips 
seemed to move. I do not speak of this work often, for 
fear it might be thought I was romancing; but, gentle- 
men, I do not mind telling you. We are all friends. Lis- 
ten: That portrait was so realistic that it had to be taken 
to a barber shop and shaved three times a week." 

There were two "dull, sickening thuds" as Joullin and 
Robinson fell to the floor. 



The artists are the best fellows but the hardest kickers 
in the world. Never is there a picture show but what 
every painter growls about the "idiots on the hanging com- 
mittee," and thinks that his fellow brushman has got the 
best of it. Now, we will see how the jolly grumblers will 
conduct a show of their own. 

They held a secret meeting on Wednesday last, and pre- 
pared a programme for an independent art exhibition, to 
be given within a week or so at the Press Club. No lay- 
man from the Bohemian Club or the Art Institute need 
apply. That is to say he will of course be privileged to 
attend the show and admire and buy the pictures, but he 
will have no voice in the management or the hanging. 

"They are good chaps, these art-patronizing laymen," 
said one of the artists the other day, " but they don't 
know a Whistler from a Millet. They invariably sky the 
good things, and they bunch the pictures so that the 
room looks like a drunken rainbow. Give us artists on the 
hanging committee and you'll see a real show." 

And then he told me the ingenious scheme. 

The artists are to be the judges of one another's paint- 



ings. For instance if Latimer sends in a work, the other 
fellows, including Jergensen, will pass on its worth or un- 
worth. If Wores offers a canvas the chances are that 
Joullin and Stanton will be on the jury. It's a poor rule 
that wan't work sixty-five ways, and unless the artists of 
San Francisco show more brotherly love than they have 
shown in the past, I don't see how a single picture will 
ever get as far as the hanging committee. 



UI'ON SMOKING AN ELECTION CIGAR. 

I smoke, and I think of how Kipling 

Remarked, (let us trust 'twas in joke), 

"A woman is only a woman, 

But a good cigar 's a smoke." 

Ah, Kip, if you'd chewed at this stogie 
You would have writ thusly, I hope: 

"A woman is only a woman, 
But a bad cigar 's a rope." 



A large, husky collector of poll tax called at George 
Hall's office the other day and intimated that several of 
Mr. Hall's dollars were shy in the collection. Mr. Hall po- 
litely explained that he was the Turkish Consul, and ex- 
empt from personal taxation both in this country and 
the country that he represented. He would willingly, he 
said, pay the measly amount, but he feared that by doing 
so be might stir up an international complication. A con- 
sul is a pretty sacred person, especially when he is George 
Hall. 

"See here," said the collector, in no small voice, "you 
hustle up an' flash de dough; dere's nobody wot's exempt, 
'ceptin' Injuns and idiots." 

"By the beard of the Sultan I" said the Turkish Consul, 
grabbing a life-sized Kohinoor that he uses for a paper 
weight in times of peace, "I'm the Indian, and you know 
what you are." Knocking three times on a secret panel 
with the Kohinoor, some several trusty eunuchs, orna- 
mented by scimeters, appeared and surrounded the offen- 
sive poll-taxer. He has never been seen or heard of 
since. 

It is whispered along the water front that on this same 
night a long, low, rakish gondola was seen off the suicide 
section of Goat Island, with its crimson fezzed crew drop- 
ping a heavily loaded sack about six feet in length into 
the deep. This may be merely a coincidence, but nobody 
has ever made a second endeavor to trifle with the consular 
dignitary of Turkey, and the Sultan has just ordered a 
new decoration cast for the diplomatic guardian of his 
pride and dignity at the Golden Gate. 
» * # 

Word from San Andreas that an angry citizen of that 
place had pied the forms of the Calaveras Citizen, edited 
by C. O. Ziegenfuss — "Zieg" of the palmy days of San 
Francisco journalism — because of alleged libels published 
in that paper, brings a smile to those who knew "Zieg," 
and remember his unhappy propensity for getting into 
trouble. 

"Zieg" has drifted in successive stages from managing 
editorship of a San Francisco daily to the sole editorship 
and what not of an obscure country weekly, the Calaveras 
Citizen. At every stage he encountered troubles, but 
none, perhaps, more seriously interesting than when he 
reached the point where it was his lot to edit a country 
daily, the Fresno Expositor. On the Expositor "Zieg" 
had an "experience" every day of his life, a fair sample of 
which was furnished him by Mrs. Fiske-Marceau-Fennell, 
when he stepped in, editorially, and prevented that lady 
of many husbands and "experiences" from getting a di- 
vorce from Fennell. 

The fame of Mrs. Fiske-Marceau-Fennell is wide. Mar- 
ried to Fiske of Fresno when she was fifteen and he fifty, 
she managed to exist in Fresno until the bullet of a fanatic 
made her a widow with half a million at her command. 
Her marriage with Marceau, the photographer, followed. 
Of their married life and accompanying divorce and scan- 
dals, San Francisco does not need to be reminded. Fen- 
nell, the crack life insurance agent, was next led to the 
altar by this charming lady. She also led him to the di- 
vorce courts, Fresno being selected as the scene. On a 
Monday Mr. and Mrs. Fennell and party arrived in Los 
Angeles, and that evening Fennell permitted himself to be 



January 6, 1900. 



BAN FRA: ■■ 1 ill: 



11 



where he should not have been. The following 
psday the parly arrived at Fresno, and before night 
Fennell had applied for divorce on the grounds of 
adultery, citing the Los Angeles incident. On Tb 
Fennell's answer, making a general denial, was file. 
Friday the case was to be tried, but wasn't, for "'/Apr" 
was in Fresno, itching for a sensation for his paper. 
Thursday night the Expositor served Mrs. Fennel', to 
Fresno in the most approved yellow style. Little was 
left for the imagination. Mrs. Fiske-Marceau-Fennell 
may be said to have been served up naked. 

Among the other effects left Mrs. Fennell by the little- 
lamented Fiske, was a nigger who had in the early days 
of the 'ady's career whipped an editor for her. With this 
nigger, Fennell and the two witnesses of Fennell's evil 
doing, she called at "Zieg's" house. One of "Zieg's" 
faithful reporters arrived at the house on his wheel just in 
time to save "Zieg" his honor and his skin. 

It was a very warm night, and "Zieg," who weighs 
something over 300, had reduced suffering to a minimum 
by stripping himself to shirt and drawers. In this condi- 
tion he was taken by the enemy. The reporter found the 
nigger, Fennell and the two witnesses in "Zieg's" room, 
and "Zieg," trembling with heat, fear and excitement, 
scanning an as yet unsigned retraction of all the evil about 
Mrs. Fennell which had appeared in the Expositor that 
afternoon. The enemy had ugly-looking clubs and canes, 
"Zieg" was stripped to almost nothing, and the reporter 
was unarmed. 

Wit took the place of numbers. Making an excuse that 
he wished to consult with his subordinate, "Zieg" was 
permitted to go into the next room. There "Zieg" con- 
fided to the reporter that he would sign the paper, and 
then have the crowd arrested for house-breaking, but the 
reporter ruled differently. He put the "retraction" in 
his pocket, so that "Zieg" could not sign it, and bolted 
past the enemy. In an instant he was at the gate and 
his hand on the handle-bars of his wheel. All was easy 
after that. An arm of the law had cleared the house 
within ten minutes after the reporter had made his 
escape. 

The divorce was not granted that week as scheduled. 
In fact, much to Mrs. Fennell's chagrin, the case, owing 
to "Zieg's" articles, was thrown out of court. 

It is with such adventures that "Zieg" spices the 
monotony of journalism. His little row at San Andreas is 
but characteristic of the man. Without hair-breadth es- 
capes journalism wouldn't be journalism for "Zieg," and 
"Zieg" wouldn't be "Zieg." 

* * * 

The other evening two British globe-trotters who had 
just arrived in San Francisco and had heard of the fabu- 
lous prices paid for cab hire here, and had been warned 
to always make a bargain with the driver in advance, ap- 
proached the vehicle of "Finney the hackman," which 
always stands at the corner of Geary street and Grant 
avenue. 

" Oh, I say, Cabby, what'U your charge be to drive us 
out to a restaurant called the Riche?" asked one of the 
Englishmen. 

Finney looked them over a second or two in wonder, and 
then answered : " I'll see that you get there safely for 50 
cents." 

"Not half bad," said the Englishmen, as they climbed 
in. The spokesman handed Finney the stipulated fare. 

Finney closed the cab door on his guests, took the head 
of his blanketed horse, and led the animal two or three 
doors up Grant avenue, opened the door, bowed and 
pointed out the Riche to the amazed Britishers, led his 
horse back to the corner, and without a smile waited for 
his next load. 

* * » 

So the once beautiful Comtesse de Castiglione is dead, 
dead in her dreary, shutter-darkened rooms, with the 
wreck of the lovely portrait which she tore to shreds be- 
To be aure that you are drinking champagne always order a bottle 
of Munim's. It 19 the wine of society. Have it served cold, and you 
are safe in doing the proper thing. 

Geo. T. Marsh is known the world over as an expert judge of 
Japanese goods. His store under the Palace Hotel is filled with new 
Oriental curios and art wares. 



cause it recalled her triumphs of the past. Some faded 
beauties take comfort in their ftffe by dwelling on the 
glories of their youth, but the 1 rew over I 

as the wrinkles increased, and the contrast between past 
and present enraged her. Yet there were things in that 
same triumphant past which kindly pitying friends did not 
care to recall, and perhaps her memory held some stings 
in her solitary, abandoned hours. 

It was the Comtesse de Castiglione who appeared at 
the Court balls of the Second Empire in the guise of 
Salammbo, and divers other ladies not conspicuous for 
over-dressing. It is she also who gets the credit of pro- 
voking the only witty retort assigned to the ill-fated 
Empress Eugenie. The "fair and frail" Court beauty 
wore a jewelled heart which rumor declared to be the 
gift of the highest in the land, and she had the temerity 
to attract the notice of the Imperial Consort. "What 
does your Majesty think of my heart?" she asked, point- 
ing to the jewel glittering on a bosom which owned little 
other covering. "II ett frit beau Madame," replied the 
Imperial beauty, eyeing the treasure critically, "irts beau, 
mais tin ]>cu haul place'.* 



"If you 

?=5s=- see a thing too often, you no 
longer see it ; if you hear a 
thing too often, you no longer 
hear it." Perhaps you've seen 
and heard so much of "Pearline ' 
that it makes no impression 
upon you. Then it's time to wake up and look 
about and see what Pearline is doing for other 
women. It gives the easiest, quickest, most 
economical washing and cleaning. r,rs 



AUTOMOBILES to the FRONT! 

The Sparks Machine 
the Best. : : : 



The lightest, strongest, cheapest and most durable. It climbs the steepos 
grades and is practicable on all ldnds of roads. 

It is what everybody wants. 

There is an active demand for the company's stock. 
There Is more money to be made In Automobiles than In Oil or Mining. 
A limited amount of stock is offered at One Dollar per share. Par value $10 
Full information at the office of the 

Sparks Automobile Company 




325 Parrott Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



S. GUODENOUGH, Secretary. 



FINE IMPORTED 



$30 == Scotch Tweeds == $40 

Also a large line of Hiuh-Grade Serges, Worsteds. 
Vestings, Golf Knickerbockers, and Hose : : : : 

Cr^i-ial Have just received from London shipment of novelties in 
OpCLJal ladies' Costume Cloths. Inspection Invited. 

CRAIG BROTHERS, Importing Tailors 

120 Sutter Street, bet, Kearny and Montgomery streets. Take elevator. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 6, 1900. 




r CWu£Jkl/j£tf 



While business on the surface is apparently 
Oil Weils very dull with the majority of companies on 
Opening Up, the California Oil Exchange, work is being 
actively pushed in the field in all directions 
and with remarkable results, in some cases. A vast num- 
ber of wells have been showing up of late, and among these 
are many which never find the way into print. There are 
few of the new districts which have not opened the New 
year with a "gusher," and these, in turn, give encourage- 
ment to other companies in the vicinity, putting more 
heart into those struggling against odds in an effort to 
put a well down. The men at the head and front of the 
undertaking calculated to develop what is destined to 
prove one of the more important industries of the State 
are now facing the reaction which must always be ex- 
pected after the initial movement in the wheels of an or- 
ganization. There always is more or less of a back drag 
on occasions of the kind, requiring nerve and courage to 
withstand the temporary pressure. Once this is lifted 
things will go with a whirl, and run smoother than ever. 
In the field the situation is brighter than it ever was. 

The "gold in sea water" fiend of the cen- 

The Ocean tury will not down. Suppressed in one 

Gold Reserves, hemisphere he bobs up serenely in another. 

No sooner has the Rev. Dr. Jerningham 
retired, like all good Americans, to Paris on the gains 
of his New England Reduction Works, which have very 
appropriately been devoted to the canning of sardines, 
formerly only landed from the net of the apostolic 
fisherman, than his successor appears in Great Brit- 
ain. In a recent number of the Mining Journal, the latest 
process for the recovery of the metal in solution is dealt 
in at some length, from which it appears that the precip- 
itation of gold is effected by the introduction of organic 
matter. According to the new formula, each ton of sea 
water, equal to 200 gallons, precipitates one pound of 
sludge, which contains from one-half to one grain of gold. 
Consequently each ton of sludge contains from 1120 to 2240 
grains, or from about 1\ to 5 ounces of gold. The Jour- 
nal, in summing up, says there are fair grounds for sup- 
posing that the latest process for extracting gold from 
sea water may prove chemically quite feasible, but this is 
by no means equivalent to saying that it is likely to prove 
a commercial success. 

The tabulated returns of the gold yield in 
British Colonial the British Colonies are now to hand for 
Gold Yield. the past 11 months of 1899 in ounces, as 
follows: New South Wales, 449 000 
against 341,722 in 1898; Victoria, 756,812, against 837 257 
in 1898; West Australia, 1,339,046, against 1,050 179 in 
1898. Queensland, 842,500, against 918,100 in 1898- Tas- 
mania, 57,402, against 48,913 in 1898; 350,121, against 
280,176 in 1898; India, 404,854, against 415,147; British 
Guiana, 91,278, against 113,070 in 1898; Transvaal, 4 133 - 
348, against 4,555,009 in 1898; Rhodesia, 55,343, against 
24,581 in 1898. The output from the Transvaal returns 
showed a steady increase from January, when the yield 
was 431,010 ounces, until August, when it amounted to 
482.108 ounces. In September only 426,556 ounces were 
taken out, the yield dropping to 19,906 ounces in October 
and to 12,000 ounces in November. So much for the war. 
Business has opened the year very quietly 
The Comstock n Pine street, with the prices for Corn- 
Mining Market, stock shares working on a still lower plane. 
This, however, does not dash the hopes of 
dealers on the long side of the market, who are quite pre- 
pared to face dull times until arrangements near comple- 
tion involving a change in methods of work on the lode 
The bears are in clover for the present, but even with 
them margins for profit are trimmed too close to make 
trading interesting. In the meantime work is being 
pushed en the cheap power plant, and the drainage sys- 
tem at the North-end mines is working more smoothly and 
satisfactorily, serving to lighten up the gloom now bang- 
ing over the street. The first returns from Con. Cal - 



Virginia ores from the present crushing at the Morgan 
mill have been received in the form of two bars valued at 
over $9,000, of which $5,0C0 is gold. The Middle mines 
should be showing up soon, as work progresses in Potosi 
ground and in the Zadig drift. 

There are indications that California 
Better Demand For gold mines will be in demand again be- 
Califomia Mines. I° re many months have passed, and 

already quite a number of men are 
moving about the State in search of available prop- 
erties. These will have to be new to score a success. 
Old, weather-worn, cast-off concerns will not stand much 
of a show in the new order 01 things, and good prospects 
on easy terms will be more in demand. The installment 
racket is still being worked, but in order to do so the 
back woods have to be ransacked for hayseeds, who part 
with their money easily. It is useless to warn foolish peo- 
ple of this class against the snares set for them. They 
are not thankful for an intimation of danger ahead, and 
in any event they are sure to flounder along in their own 
pig-headed fashion at all hazards. For these there is no 
salvation, and they may as well be robbed one way as 
another. 

The recently published description of the 
A Rival For new Ross-Browne baling tank, on the oc- 
Ross-Browne. casion of its being patented in Great 
Britain and Germany, brings out a rival 
inventor from Wales, who claims a priority of more than 
ten years for something similar, both ideas being based 
upon the production of a vacuum by withdrawing the air 
from the interior of a barrel. It looks rather strange 
upon its face that two of the leading countries in Europe 
should have granted a patent upon something exploited 
more than ten years ago. Most people will prefer to 
credit these governments with being right on the subject 
of novelty and practical utility upon the part of the Ross- 
Browne proposition. Ideas in any event are worth little 
unless the brain is there to elaborate upon them, and this 
certainly seems to have been lacking in the matter of a 
contrivance only dragged to the light at the end of a 
decade to act as a foil to another of the kind which has 
proved its practicability. 

Prank A. Leach, superintendent, and 

The Year's Yield Charles G. Yale, statistician of the 

Of Gold. United States Mint in this city, 

have prepared a preliminary statement 
of the bullion output for 1899, based on receipts at the 
United States Mint and other bullion depositories on this 
coast. This shows that California produced in 1899 gold 
to the amount of $15,000,000 and silver $636,000. As in 
the previous year the State, on the same basis of esti- 
mate, only showed a product of $14,438,601 and silver 
$415,394. There has been an increase in 1899 of $561,406 
in gold and $220,606 in silver, or a total of $782,012 for the 
year. This increase in bullion product is somewhat unex- 
pected, in view of the record "dry year" through which 
the State has just passed. A corresponding estimate of 
the output of Alaska mines during 1899 shows that the 
territorv has doubled its gold product over the previous 
year. The record for 1899 is: Gold, $4,917,821, and silver, 
$82,680, as compared with an output of gold of $2,517,121, 
and of silver of $49,152 in 1898. This shows an increase 
for the vear of $2,400,700 in gold and $33,728 silver, or a 
total of $2,434,428. It should be stated that the returns 
of the United States Assay Office at Seattle are included 
in this statement as well as those of the United States 
Mint and private depositories. 

Some of the Scotch clique which tried to wreck 

A Change the market on Jumper shares, are now quite as 

of Base, industriously bulling stock in the Longfellow 

Company, which owns ground in the same 

county. If they have no more luck in this case than they 

did in the other, there won't be much danger of the world 

catching fire. At any rate there is no accounting for 

tastes. 

No man glories in the fact that he is bald ; take warning in time if 
your scalp itches, it is just a reminder that you will sooner or later 
become bald. Use Smith's Dandruff Pomade, the only positive cure 
for itching scalp. 



January 6, 1900. 



s\\ 1 l;\\. 1- 



»J 



THE HIBERNIA BANK. 

THE annua! statement of the Hibernia Savii 
Loan Society, now to hand for the term ended 1 
ber31, HT>9, again sustains the reputation of this widely 
known and popular bank, as the strongest financial in-ti 
tution of the kind in the United States. The tota 
ureuplt- Of this amount tlT. 7 is ren- 

resented by bonds of the United States, with i: 
in other gilt-edge interest-bearing securities, and $1,658,- 
in actual cash on hand, the balance being secured 
loans and real estate, the bulk of which is located in the 
city and county of San Francisco. The reserve fund now 
amounts to 13.027,541.37. The flourishing condition of 
this bank reflects great credit upon Robert J. Tobin, 
to whose able and conservative management can be at- 
tributed the position it maintains in the world of finance. 
This is amply proven by the confidence placed in the Hi- 
bernia Bank by all classes of the community, where the 
name itself is a synonym for solidity and financial strength. 
There never yet has been a time since the Hibernia Bank- 
was first started, when during a monetary crisis which 
has shaken other institutions of the kind to their very 
base, that this staunch concern has not been found in a 
position to weather the storm and assist other weaker 
establishments out of their difficulties. This has been due 
solely to the conservatism practiced by the old and expe- 
rienced management, a conservatism reflected to-day in 
the details included in the financial statement now under 
discussion. It only requires a glance at this document to 
show the heavy reserve power held at command, an in- 
frangible safeguard against any possible emergency. 



FOLLOWING are the transactions on the Stock and 
Bond Exchange for the week beginning December 29th 
and ending January 4th : 

MISCELLANEOUS BONDS 



CalSt R8C! 1.00(10 Hi; 

Hawaiian Com*] 1,000 " 106J4 

Market 8te% 7,000® 125)4 

Market St. 1st GoriS 

Mort'e5«S l.OOOOHOX 

Nor Ry ol Cal tH.... 5,000 @ 113 



Water. Sharoa. 


H'st 


Contra Costa Water.. 
Spring Valley Water 


3.10 
596 


76 

o;s>4 


Gab and Elkctkic. 






Pacilic Gas Iiup'v'nt. 
SFGas 


50 
5 

1.167 

in 


4 


Banks. 

Bank of California.... 


30 


101 


Stbeet Railroads. 








5 

ion 


120 
6054 



Oceanic Bonds r,%.. 7.0ttn ® 105-101^ 
Oakland Transit 6°-S 1.000 @ 113 
8 F & S .1 V Ry 5%.. 2.000 O 115 
SP of Arizona 6%.. . 9.000 O 113-110 



S P Branch 6% -1.000 4 

STOCKS. 

L'st Sugar Stocks. Shares. 

li% Hana P Co 455 

92 Hawaiian C & S Co... 90 

Hutchinson 660 

Honakaa 655 

.Makaweli 250 



*', 



[Ex 


Coup 


12.3% 




H'st 


L'st 


s 
m 


87V? 


•nv< 


26 


32 


31'/, 


% 


11 
2H!4 


30 


28 


94V, 


94 


m 


i% 



i x % Onomea 470 

PaauhauSPICo 2440 

* Powders. 

403 Giant 10 

Vieorit 200 

120 Miscellaneous. 

60K Oceanic S S Co 3in 

The transactions for the week amount to H.027 shares and 40,000 bonds as 
against 8.657 shares and 40,000 bonds of the previous week. 

Towards the close of the week Sugar stocks declined somewhat, Paauhau 
selling down to 2.H. 

Oakland Transit bonds sold at 113. They will be ex-coupon next Monday. 
Trading in bonds has been very light 



91 



Not only the Prince of Wales, but all bis children 

play the banjo. The Prince himself learnt it ten years 
ago from one of the Brothers Bohee, who related 
that he smoked cigars all through the lessons. This 
started the fashionable craze for the instrument. The 
Duchess of Fife used to amuse himself by picking out 
breakdowns. The late Duke of Clarence used to play the 
banjo when in his regiment and at Sandringham, whilst 
Princess Charles of Denmark has always found its tink- 
ling tones congenial to her high spirits. Only this year 
the Duke of York handled a banjo for the first time, after 
hearing the Pierrots, and not two months ago some banjo 
strings were especially ordered to be sent to Marlborough 
House for the Prince of Wales' American banjo. 

Central Cafe, coffee and luncheon parlor, 211 Grant avenue. The 
place to get a fine steak, tender chop, excellent coffee, tea and pure 
milk. Neat and prompt service. M. D. Christensen. proprietor. 

Roses are always ready, and violets are coming in. Leopold the 
florist, 35 Post street, has an established reputation for fresh, fragrant 
flowers. His telephone is Main 1139. 

An ideal little Japan is to be seen at Marsh's store under the 
Palace Hotel. Everything unique and artistic in the way of Japan- 
ese goo Js is for sale there. 



A LION'S SHARE 



Bt what you receive when you pun 
a share of stock in : 



The San Benito 
Oil Company 

l'or it is equivalent lo 20 or more ordinary 
sbates of stock, for the company controls over 
12,000 acres of valuable oil territory which 
may be divided into 20 or more sub-companies 
For every share you puicbase of our stock 
now you will get an equivalent number in the 
new companies when formed. Investigate 
this offei at once and "get in on the ground 
floor " by the purchase of some of the Treas- 
ury Stock just placed on sale at the low 
price of one dollar. 

Stock Positively Non-Assessable. 
Send for Prospectus. 

MILLS BUILDING, Tenth Ploor. 



EQUITABLE (X COMPANY 

This Company owns United States patent to 
160 acres of land, located in the very center of 
the oil belt of the ::::::::;:: 

KERN COUNTY DISTRICT 

And surrounded by flowing: wells. This dis- 
trict bids fair to become the richest oil region 
in the world :;:;::::;::;: 

Stock Listed on California Oil Exchange. 

c . 5000 SHARES TREASURY STOCK 

INOW rOr b3lC for Development Purposes at a 

H ONE DOLLAR PER SHARE 

No further stock will be offered except at a 
large advance in price :::::;::: 

OFFICE-405 Montgomery St., Room 5, S. F. 
GRAY BROTHERS 



(^oncrete and Artificial 
STONE WORK 



228 Montgomery Street, S. F. 
205 New High St., Los Angeles. 



BROUGHAMS and COUPES (Rubber Tires) 
Tomkinson's Livery Stable 

57-59-61 Minna street, between First and 
Second. One block from Palace Hotel. 
Carriages and coupes at Pacific Union Club, 
corner Post and Stockton. Tel. Main 158 
Every vehicle requisite for weddincH, par- 
ties, calling, shopping, business, or pleasure 
Special orders for four-in-hands. 
Tel. Main 153. Established 1862. 

J. Tomklnson, Proprietor 




14 



SAN FEANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



January 6, iqoo. 



PERSONALIS 



According to reports received in St. Petersburg 

from Russian authorities in Central Asia, the Ameer of 
Afghanistan is growing insane, and serious troubles are 
impending in that country. Not only is Abdurrahman un- 
accountably suspicious toward all Europeans there, but 
he openly regards the contribution paid to him by the 
Anglo-Indian Government as a subsidy for defending the 
English territories from Russian attacks, and considers 
himself entitled at any moment to join hands with Russia 
— on condition, however, that the Czar's representatives 
will pay him well enough. At Kahul at present, accord- 
ing to Russian accounts, the Ameer is sanctioning a series 
of terrible murders, which confirm the impression that the 
Ameer has become insane. The last of the atrocities 
committed there had a high official for its victim. His 
legs were bound to two stakes of wood, which were fixed 
crosswise one upon the other. Then the woods were 
drawn apart until his body was torn in two. Two other 
officials in high places, Mirza-Abdoul-Halim and Mirza- 
Abdoul-Hakim, were bound together and set on fire, and 
a Persian is alleged to have been thrown into a boiler and 
his remains thrown to the Ameer's dogs. Russia is watch- 
ing affairs in Afghanistan very closely, because grave 
events are taking place there, and because the health of 
the Ameer is growing worse and worse, and his position 
more and more insecure. 

Mile. Emma Calve (or should one call her "Madame,' 

since, as all the world knows, she has an English hus- 
band?) has just had a droll experience, according to a 
private letter received here by a friend of mine from a 
member of her company in America. The great canta- 
trice, it seems, went to a post-office to call for a regis- 
tered letter. But as she had neglected to provide her- 
self with the two addressed envelopes necessary, over 
there as in France, to establish proof of identity, the clerk 
refused to hand over to her the valuable package in ques- 
tion. Calve, as is her wont, was just a little furious. But 
the clerk stood firm. He bad absolutely nothing, he said, 
to show that she was the great Emma Calve. Wherefore 
the prima donna was constrained to appeal to the post- 
master himself. This official backed up the prudent de- 
cision of his subordinate. He had no proofs, he said po- 
litely, that the lady was Mile. Calve. "So you don't be- 
lieve that I am myself," said the great singer. "Very 
well, listen to this. It is the best proof I can give you." 
Whereupon, in the presence of the scandalized clerks and 
the astounded members of the public present, she lifted 
up her glorious voice in the famous aria from Carmen,. 
This original, yet after all very natural proof of identity, 
was accepted, and Calv6 got her registered letter. 

The best and quickest way to learn languages is, 

and has been for ages, the subject of much discussion. One 
of the most novel means ever employed for the purpose 
was that made use of by Slatin Pasha, who was for so 
long a prisoner of the Madhi. Sir Rudolph, as he now is, 
is an Austrian by birth, and until a few months back he 
was unable, naturally enough, to speak or write really 
good grammatical English. Now he does both. How did 
he manage it? Well, during the recent Soudan campaign, 
when cigarettes were at a premium, Sir Rudolph made a 
bargain with his companions in arms, by which he agreed 
to pay a fine of one cigarette to every individual who con- 
victed him of making an error whilst speaking. Slatin's 
conversation was naturally listened to with the very great- 
est of interest by one and all. The experiment cost him a 
good many valuable cases of cigarettes, but the results 
were really wonderful, and he now speaks English almost 
without a trace of foreign accent. The experiment was 
worthy of the man who, when slightly wounded in the 
hand, hacked off a maimed finger with his own sword, 
"because it waggled and got in the way." 



Food for Babies 
Must be nourishing and suitable and by "suitable food" is meant 
a food which a child will properly digest and assimilate. Gail Boiden 
Eagle Brand Condensed Milk for forty years has been the leading 
infant food. Book entitled "Babies" sent free. 



Electric Light Wiring 




our specialty. 
Wiring for gas 
lighting and 3 
bells. Call sys- 
tem for offices. 
All kinds of £ 
electrical repairs 
solicited A full 
line of Electrical 



Supplies always in Stock 

CALIFORNIA 
ELECTRICAL 
WORKS 

409 Market Street 
San Francisco. 
Tel. Main 644 

CITY STREET IMPROVEMENT CO. 

Proprietors Fifth floor. Mills Building-, San Francisco 

Riti \YY\e±r\ Min**c Santa Cruz and Kine City, 
UllUllltll I MMCi, Monterey county. Cal, 

Contractors for all kinds of street work, bridges and railway construction, 
wharves, jetties and seawalls. 

Blake, Moffit & Towne Telephone Mai- iw 

Dealers in PAPER 




Blake, Moftit &. Towne, Los Angeles, 
Blake, McFall & Co., Portland, Or. 



55-57-59-61 First street, S. F. 



La Grande Laundry 



Cleveland L. Dam, Attorney-at-Law. 503 California St. Tel. Main 343. 



Telephone Bush 12 

Principal office, 23 Powell street, opposite Baldwin Hotel. 
Branch— 11 Taylor street, near Golden Gate avenue 
Laundry — Twelfth street, between Folsom and Howard 
streets. San Francisco. 



Frank Carr. 



Telephone Main 5611. 



The Manhattan Cafe 



25 Geary Street. 

Ladies' Cafe and Wine Rooms, 25 Brook Place, S. F. 



The Drummers' Inn 



105 Sansome street, San Francisco. 

Robi. D. Hagerty, proprietor 



ST. LAWRENCE Livery and 
Sales Stable 

423 Post street, between Powell and Mason, 
San Francisco. Telephone No. 1323 

W. E. Bridge, proprietor. 




January 6, 1900. 



SAN J NEWS 







HARD-WOOD floors bave become almost universal, for 
several reasons, but chiefly so probably on account of 
our shifting population, for the use of them saves great 
expense to the house-holder when moving time comes, both 
in the saving of carpeting and labor; added to this is their 
admitted sanitary value, coupled with their artistic. 

It is supposed that "hard-wood floors are so hard to 
keep clean;" or "one is obliged to have them wiped off 
everyday." This statement is neither wise nor truthful. 
There is no doubt that servants prefer carpets, for, like 
the house painter, they approve established precedent and 
move in a rut. Besides their carelessness in a carpeted 
house is not so readily perceptible. 

In flooring a dwelling the first consideration in chiice of 
woods must be the use to which the rooms are to be put. 

It is a fact that quartered oak, so-called because the 
wood is sawed crosswise through the heart, thereby 
doubling its durability, is the best known flooring on ac- 
count of its hardness. An oak floor does not dent or mar, 
thus its superiority over other woods for rooms in constant 
use. For dioing rooms it is unequalled and where the 
question of expense does not enter it is best for kitchens. 
Another fact in their favor is, that when filled with light 
wood filler and shellacked they do not show dust. Oak 
floors do not take on so high a polish as some other woods, 
as the wood is not so finely grained. 

The proper treatment for an oak floor newly laid is to 
cover it with six coats of white shellac; this would cost for 
a room fourteen feet by twenty-three feet sixteen dollars. 
Quite an outlay at first, but this will not need renewing 
for eight years on a floor subject to ordinary usage. 
When dry the floor should be waxed, which prevents the 
floor from being scratched. 

A man should do the work for fifteen cents an hour; any 
laboring man of ordinary intelligence can do the work. 
The wax should be thinly applied with a cloth, well rubbed 
in with a flannel, then allowed to stand for an hour before 
the weighted brush is used. This brush costs five dollars. 
The floor wax costs about a dollar a can. Five cans will 
keep the floors of a medium-sized dwelling well waxed for 
one year; the wax should be kept in the cellar, the can 
covered. 

~= The floor should be well rubbed with the brush. Always 
rub with the grain of the wood. In two weeks rub the 
floor again for half an hour; any maid-servant can per- 
form this task. 

When the floor is swept it should be with either a hair 
broom or a broom with a pillow-case made of outing, canton 
flannel, cheese-cloth or ordinary muslin. Never touch the 
floor with water, which removes' the wax. If very dirty, 
before waxing, the floor may be wiped off with a damp 
cloth; twice a year it should be cleaned with turpentine. 
Oak floors do not require waxing oftener than once in two 
months, as they are slippery. As heat causes the wax to 
become sticky, it is not well to have them waxed more 
than once during the summer. 

One great fault with the use of floor wax is that if 
rocking chairs are used the wax forms hard, black cakes 
beneath the rockers; this must be scraped off with a knife 
before rewaxing. The most satisfactory hard-wood floor, 
however, is when laid by some reliable firm, the Bush & 
Mallett Company of this city for instance, and avoid all 
the bother of detail. 



Fob a good luncheon, dinner, or breakfast go to the Maison Riche, 
at the corner of Grant avenue and Geary street, where the chefs, 
waiters, wines, and napery are the finest to be had. Real French 
cooking at the Riche. 

We consider scientific testimony to be of the first importance, but we also 
have letters from ladies all over the land telling: of the merits of Oreme de 
Lis for the complexion. It is harmless and eventually " creates a perfect 
complexion." 



ST MINI NT 

Ot Iht Condition ana v a i u r of lh« tai.t, and llablllll.l ol THE 

HIBERNIA SAVINGS 
AND LOAN SOCIETY 

A CORPORATION 

And where said Assets are Situated. Dated DECEMBER 31, 1899. 



ASSETS. 

1 -Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, the actual 
value of which Is 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and debts Is as 
Follows: They are all existing Contracts, owned bs said 
potation, and are pas able t.. it at its Office, which [a situated 
at the Corner of Market. MoAlllster and Jones streets. In the 
City and County of Ban Francisco. State of California, mid the 
payment thereof is seoured by First Mortgages on Real I 
within this State. Said Promissory Notes ore kept and held 
by said Corporation at its Bald Office* whioh Is its principal 
place "f business, and said Notes and debts are there situated* 

8— Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, the actual 

value of which is 47.200.00 

The condition of said Promissory Notes and debts is as 
follows: They are all existing Contracts, owned by said Cor- 
poration, and ore payable to it at its Office, which is Bituated 
as aforesaid, and the payment thereof is secured by "Spring 
Valley "Water Works Second Mortgage I per cent Bonds," 
Park and Cliff Hou.sc Railway * Company 6 per cent Bonds." 
"Market street Railway Company First Consolidated Mort- 
gage & per cent Gold Bond" and "United States Registered!) 
per cent Bonds," the market value of all said b Is being 8fl7,- 

220.(10. Said Notes are kept and held by said Corporation at 
its said Office, and said Notes and Bonds are there situated. 

8— Bonds of the United States, the actual value of which is... 17,733,503.71 

The condition of said Bonds is as follows: They belong to 

said Corporation, and are kept ami held by it in its own Vaults 

and are there situated. 
They are "Registered -1 per cent ($16,000,000.00) and 3 per cent 

(8500,000.00) United States Bonds" and are payable only to the 

order of said Corporation. 

4 — Miscellaneous bonds, the actual value of which is 2,832,737.26 

The condition of said Bonds is as follows: They belong to 
said Corporation, and are kept and held by it in its own 
Vaults, and are there situated. They are "Market Street Cable 

Railway Company 6 per cent Bonds (8937, .00)," "Market 

Street Railway Company First Consolidated Mortgage 6 per 
cent Bonds (8282,000.00)," "Sutter Street Railway Company 5 
per cent Bonds ($150,000.00)," "Powell street Railway Com- 
pany 6 percent Bonds (850,000,00)'," Northern Railway Com- 
pany of California 6 per cent Bonds ($850,000.00)." "San Fran- 
cisco and North Pacific Railway Company 5 per cent Bonds 
(Sl90.000.00l," "Spring Valley Water Works Second Mortgage 
1 per cent Bonds (8836,000.00)," "Spring Valley Water Works 
Third Mortgage 4 per cent Bonds ($242,000.00)," and "City of 
San Luis Obispo .5 per cent Bonds (827,000.36)." 

5— Interest on Miscellaneous Bonds accrued to January 1, 1900.,. 56,869 17 

6— (a) Real Estate situated in the City and County of Sun Fran- 
cisco, 8821,711 3(1; and in the Counties of Santa Clara, 8188,981 75; 
Alameda, 8122,068 73. and San Mateo, 830,486 51, in said Slate, 

the actual value of which is 1,163,193 35 

(b) The land and building: in which said Corporation keeps 

its said Office, the actual value of which is 567,846 08 

The condition of said Real Estate is that it belongs to said 
Corporation and part of it is productive. 

7— Proportion of Taxes for the Fiscal Year 1899-1900 chargeable 
to next half year 51,981. 19 

8— Cash in United States Gold and Silver Coin, belonging to said 
Corporation, and in its possession, and situated at its said 
Office; Actual Value 1,558,607.60 

Total Assets 848,298,815.33 

LIABILITIES. 
1— Said Corporation owes Deposits amounting to and the actual 

value of which is $15,265773.96 

The condition of said Deposits is that they are payable only 
out of said Assets and are fully secured thereby. 

2— Reserve Fund; Actual Value 8,027.541,37 

Total Liabilities 848,298,315.83 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, 

By JAMES R. KELLY. President. 

The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society, 

By ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 6, 1900. 



THE WOOING AND THE 

TYPEWRITER 



Mrs. Beatrice Barton, of London, to 
Dr. Alfred Knowles, of Liverpool. 

My Dear Dr. Knowles : I am 
writing to express my daughter's ap- 
preciation of the beautiful roses you 
sent her the day you started for Liv- 
erpool. She would be very glad to 
thank you personally but for a sad 
accident which has deprived her, for 
a time, at least, of the use of her right 
hand. It is a burn — how serious we 
do not know yet. Needless to say, it 
is having the very best of care, though 
I have found myself wishing more than 
once that you were & burn specialist. 

It is very painful of course, but I 
think your roses have helped her to 
bear it. With kindest regards, in 
which my daughter joins me, I am, 
Sincerely yours, 

Beatrice Barton. 
11. 
Dr. Knowles to Mrs. Barton. 

My Dear Mrs. Barton: Thank you 
very much for your kindness in writ- 
ing to me. I am greatly distressed 
by the news of Miss Helen's accident, 
and sincerely hope that it may not 
prove serious. I can fully understand 
your anxiety, and I very much esteem 
your thought of me in the midst of it. 
As the roses have proved beneficial, 
I think I may safely lay claim to some- 
thing more than a nerve specialist, 
and I shall repeat the treatment at 
the first opportunity. I am writing 
to Miss Helen in the hope of cheering 
her up. Very cordially yours, 

Alfred Knowles. 
hi. 
Dr. Knowles to Miss Barton. 

My Dear Miss Barton: I have just 
had a note from your mother, telling 
me of your sad accident. Believe me, 
I am deeply grieved by the occurrence 
and am tempted to return instantly 
to London. But a young and strug- 
gling practice, particularly in special 
lines, admits of no desertion, other- 
wise I should be doing my best to 
make the hours pass more cheerfully 
for you. 

I have wired to a florist in London 
to send you roses every morning un- 
til your hand is quite healed — for I 
know of nothing more like a rose than 
my little friend in London — and I 
hope you will accept them, with the 
best wishes of Your friend, 

Alfred Knowles. 



Miss Barton to Dr. Knowles. 

Dear Dr. Knowles : Mamma is 
writing for me, as you doubtless per- 
ceive, though I don't know that you 
ever saw any of the scrawls I call my 
"writing." Indeed, I will accept the 
roses with pleasure, for the time is 
very long indeed; and those which 
came this morning will give me a 
whole day of happiness. Thanking you 



for your kind thought of me, I am, 
Sincerely yours, 

Helen Barton. 



My Dear Miss Barton: It must be 
very hard for so active a girl as your- 
self to be kept from doing the things 
she likes best to do, and thinking of 
this has led me to take the liberty of 
providing something for your amuse- 
ment. 

I have a friend in London who has 
the agency for the Narcissus type- 
writer, and I have written him to 
lend you a new machine. I have told 
him you would like to try it for a 
month or so, and, perhaps, after you 
had learned to use it, you might wish 
to keep it. 

It will be sent to you at once, and 
you can write all you please with your 
left hand. I hope you will not deny 
me the pleasure of d ing this small 
thing for you — and 1 should like to 
have some of the letters you will write 
on it sent to me. 

Very truly your friend, 

Alfred Knowles. 



deRe DR KroWles: The typewrtr 
hass come as you) See & I am wRItin 
mt firsletter on iT To you — I was 
nor down STIrs yet when it cpmeso 
Mamma learned how to use it FrOm 
the MAN. She puty the paer in it 
for meand I write on it & turn the 
CranLL with my lefT hand(: i had nO 
ideaa typeRIchTTing was so eassy 
and Plea)ant i do not wonder that so 
so maNNy gir(s lea5 their ho9eS for 
the Tpwritqr in OPFices it i£ so sim- 
ple there seemsto be no nEEd for 
Bu£ine££ coolegess.? My ha) is much 
better now but the Dr. Thin's thEi 
ma7 ha2e to graftt new skin on it 
frrrom my fred£, :I shal find out who 
my fRiendss a&e i wkould NOt wan9 
to be pealled up for ver many peoplE. 
I. am tired of thee typewrqtr now 
£so good bve from vou fr9d. 

helEn Barto3 

VII. 

My Dear Miss Helen: 1 am de- 
lighted with your letter and shall al- 
ways keep it. Typewriting is, as you 
say, very easy and pleasant, and when 
every one learns as easily as you do, 
there will be no need for business col- 
leges. I am astonished that you 
should do so well the first time, and 
with your left hand at that; yet you 
are so accomplished in so many ways 
that I should not be surprised — that 
is, really surprised — at anything you 
chose to do. 

Do you remember what a delightful 
time we had only three weeks ago, 
when we rode through Regents Park? 
There is no time like the autumn for 
cycling, is there? And here I am in 
Liverpool waiting for patients who do 
not come, and my little friend is suf- 
fering with a bad burn. 

If there is any grafting to be done, 



Enameliite 

is perfectly ODORLESS, 
and that is another reason 
why it is the Modern Stove 
Polish. You will not have 
to move out of the house 
until it " burns off," if you 
use Enameline. "My stove 
shines in the night," a lady 
writes. Put up in paste, 
cake or liquid form. No 
other has so large a sale. 

J. L. PRESCOTT & CO., New York 



Miss Helen, I will come to London and 
submit to the operation gladly, since 
it is for you. Much better results are 
to be had when all the skin is taken 
from the same person, and you may 
tell your physician that one person is 
ready to supply it all. It is not in the 
least painful — cocaine, you know, and 
that sort of thing — and I may have to 
come to London anyway. So please 
consider that question settled, and let 
me know when I am needed. Upon 
my soul ! here comes a patient. Au 
revoir, Ever yours, 

A. K. 



Dear D5 kNoWles: I am ve2y much 
touched by Yop8 o44er to come to 
lon3ok and be grAFFTdiknowthere 
must besome PAiN connte4 with the 
opperation and it is NoBLE ahd gej- 
jerous of you to suHMit to it for me. 
I cannot accet tye jacrifl Ze even iff 
is neceSXary for somebody to 3e cut 
up the roses com3 every day and iam 
more gratefull than words can es- 
pre££. 8you are the only firiend that 
pa6s any attention ( )) my Burnabd I 
shall always reMamber it gratefuly9 
yours gratfully He??enbArto3. 



My Dear Little Girl : Nothing 
that I could do for you would be en- 
titled to the name of sacrifice, since 
it would be a selfish pleasure. There 
is absolutely no pain connected with 
the operation of skin grafting, and it 
is simple in the extreme, if it has to 
be done to your pretty dimpled hand, I 



" I find them the best preparation for 
colds, coughs and asthma." — MBS. S. A. 
Watson, Temperance Lecturer. 

D D 11 111 M ' C Bronchial 
DnUflN O Troches 

OP BOSTON 

Sold in Hwea only— Avoid imitations. 



January 6, 1900. 

want to help — it will be no depriva- 
tion; I have any amount of skin, and 
can spare it just as well as not. 
Please, Mistress Helen, let me do it. 
Yours always, a. k. 

x. 

Dear E251es: I have cRied ovver 
your lttr till I ca44oy hardly see the 
typericchter- I w4s bGiNINII to 
think I had no frieEs? nobody comes 
to seememamma Had to g() to Ken- 
Xiogton and I am all alone except for 
Papa and he doessest caRs how much 
haCd hurtx i dojy believx thaA wil 
ha ve to graft butt I shall always re- 
mEMb er your kind offr5 I am so 
lonesome and nob8dy care" and my 
headaces. Sinxerylyours 

HeLe? Bart34 

P. S. Don't you tbin8 I am imprO- 
6ing in my typwriting ???? 

XI. 

My Vest Dear Helen: Your let- 
ter has touched me very much more 
than mine could possibly have touched 
you, and my heart aches for the poor 
little girl who is so bravely bearing 
her suffering alone. You have cer- 
tainly improved very much in your 
typewriting — even the most critical 
could not wish for anything more me- 
chanically perfect than your last let- 
ter. 

You don't know how happy it makes 
me to have you tell me your troubles, 
and to feel that you trust me. I care, 
Helen, whenever the slightest thing 
perplexes or pains you, and I would 
gladly share your burden, or relieve 
you of it entirely. 

I am sure we shall be better friends 
than ever now; and won't you call me 
Alf, and let me call you Helen? This 
is only a note, for I have a lecture at 
the college and am late now. 

Devotedly your friend, Alp. 
xii. 

Dearalf thank you for your sym- 
PATAiit makes me braver;, the han9 
is very muxk better and they havvent 
got to gradt,but of course itt hurts 
and keeps me awakesometimes I crl 
a 1 night quith the pain of it. . I done 
see what has beccoMe of all my frien£ 
you are the only one now that gaRes 

■\X7E BUY lamp-chimneys 
by the dozen ; they go 
on snapping and popping and 
flying in pieces ; and we go 
on buying the very same 
chimneys year after year. 

Our dealer is willing to sell 
us a chimney a week for every 
lamp we burn. 

Macbeth' s "pearl top "and 
"pearl glass" do not break 
from heat ; they are made of 
tough glass. Try them. 

Our " Index " describes all lamps and their 
proper chimneys. With it you can always order 
the right size and shape of cnimney for any lamp. 
We mail it FREE to any one who writes for it. 

Address Macbeth, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



ban fra: 



«7 



IT I CI4 OFALL KINDS. NO MATTER HOW 

* ■ ^M I PREPARED IS MADE PERFECTLY 

DELICIOUS BY THE USE OF 

I $s\i COR,0,N ALAND0ENUINtWORCESTERSHint- 

V&*r. i BEWARE OF MANUFACTURERS WHO ATTEMPT TO SELL 
^T-"-V A WORTHLESS IMITATION. -~- SEE SIGNATURE. ^ 
fcfr,* •"■-' JOHN DUNCAN'S SONS. AGTS.NtW YORK. -Z 




what becomes od me. I don't care 
about the OtTheres but I hope you 
will always LOke me. 

HEin £." 

XIII. 

My Sweet Little Helen: Of course 
I shall always love you. Why need 
you express a doubt of it? I wanted 
to tell you before I came away, but I 
dared not, and now your woman's 
heart has guessed it — of course you 
shall have it always. I am terribly 
rushed, but will write again soon. 
Lovingly, Alf. 



Dr. Alfred Knowles — Dear sir; It 
is NEadless to say your letteh ras 
very much astonished me. I think 
you must be Crazyienclose yourLeTTr 
so you can see whaT you wrot3 to a 
helple££ suff rigm GI2L. 

I do not care to EVEx heAR from 
you AGAne. If you wil plese return 
my leter£ and st8p the R04es from 
coming I shall be Gratly indebtde ti 
you. Yours very truly, 

Helen bArtsN. 



My Dear Miss Barton: I have just 
read your amazing letter. I do not 
see what there is in my note, which 
you enclosed, to call forth anything 
like this. You wrote that you did 
not care for the others, but you hoped 
that I would always "loke" you, and 
I supposed you meant "love" you. 

Of course, I am not such a fool as 
to think you meant anything but fun, 
and I wrote in the same spirit — to 
cheer you up. I see now that it was 
not just the thing to write, even with 
fun in mind, but I was terribly rushed 
and I thought you would understand. 

I return your note to which the 
offending one was an answer, and if 
you insist the others will follow. But 
I hope you are too sensible a girl to 
think I meant an insult, and with all 
my heart I ask you to forgive me. 

There is no woman in the world 
whom I honor and respect more than 
I do you, and no one, man or woman, 
the loss of whose friendship would be 
so great a blow. With assurances 
of my profound regret, I am, 
Very sincerely, 

Alfred Knowles. 
xvi. 

My dear Alf; After reading my own 
noTe I do not wonDER that YOU 
rote as you EiDI acd of course I for- 
give you I 5eany to write LIKE and 
I do NoT wonder at youmis4ool.lt was 
aLH the fault of the maShino but I 



am taking great PAins now to makl 
m9 tyPeRichTTing perfect I see now 
your NOte was only fUn. 

Yours, Helen. 



My Dear Helen: You are an angel 
to forgive me for my foolish stupidity. 
It was all my fault, and I no not want 
you to blame yourself in the least. 

When I sent my last letter to you, 
Helen, I realized in a single painful 
instant what you are to me. If you 
had not forgiven me for my foolish 
blunder, I should have dropped my 
practice and gone to London to plead 
with you, and I think, Helen, for you. 

It seems a little thing to say, but 
my whole heart is in it — I love you. 
I have not much to offer you, but all 
I have is yours and ever will be. 

Words do not come easily to-night — 
I have written this a dozen times and 
then destroyed it. It is only this, 
Helen — I love you — love you — love 
you I a. 

xvm. 

My dear Alf; I am very muchh sur- 
prised but I canno say I am Displese4 
MaMMa says I am tzo young to be 
engaGed and She made me promise I 
wil not Get enGaged nor give anny 
ma4 aNy hOpe so I mustt not till I 
am 22, but I quil NEVE" marr any- 
bod'y but you. Helen. 

P. S.— Can I kepe the typeWRcht- 
ter?? h. 



Telegram 

from Russia 

" SEND TO ANITCHKOFF PALACE, 
ST. PETERSBURG, inHEDIATELY, 
ANOTHER CASE OF VIN MARIAN1 
FOR HER IHPERIAL MAJESTY 
EMPRESS OF RUSSIA." 

Ordered by the Court Physicians 



Ski 



MARIANI 



(MARIAN! WINE.) 

WORLD FAMOUS TONIC. 

Prominent People Everywhere Use It. 

Sold by all druggists. Refuse Substitutes. 
Mariani St. Oo., 52 W. 15th St., New York, pub- 
lish a handsome book of endorsements of Em- 
perors, Empress, Princes, Cardinals, Archbishops 
and other distinguished personages. It is sent 
gratis and postpaid to all who write for it. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 6, 1900. 




ciET/' 



V HE Gwin residence 
on Sacramento 
street was en fete on 
New Year's Day, the 
occasion being the mar- 
riage of Mrs. Gwin's 
granddaughter, Mary Belle, and James Follis. The 
rooms were elaborately decked with palms, ferns and 
flowers, white roses and red poinsetta predominating. In 
the large parlor to the right of the entrance, beneath a 
bower of ferns and smilax, a floral altar was placed, and 
here at noon the Rev. Dr. Foute of Grace Church per- 
formed the nuptial ceremony in the presence of about one 
hundred friends and relatives of the contracting parties. 
The bride, who was unattended, was given away by her 
father, W. I, M. Gwin, and looked very lovely in her robe 
of white satin elaborately draped with point lace. After 
the ceremony a dejeuner was served on small tables, which 
were prettily dressed with floral beauties in great variety, 
a stringed orchestra furnishing melody meanwhile. Later 
the bride and groom left for their honeymoon trip, their 
destination being unknown save to a few. The presents 
were numerous and very valuable, including a diamond 
tiara from the groom, a service of silver plate from Miss 
Jennie Flood, a pearl necklace from James L. Flood, who is 
a cousin of the groom, a large variety of silverware, cut 
glass, bric-a-brac, etc. 

New Year's Day was also selected by Miss Maie Tucker 
for her marriage to Augustine McDonald, which took 
piace at St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Oakland at eight 
o'clock p. m. The church was elaborately dressed with 
Christmas greens, and the chancel decorations were holly, 
smilax and palms. The edifice was filled with guests 
when the bridal procession entered to the strains of the 
Mendelssohn wedding march. First appeared the little 
Misses Ernestine McNear, Albertine Detrick and Marian 
Miller, gowned in white; then followed the four brides- 
maids, the Misses Elizabeth McNear, Isabelle Palmer, 
Bertha Dolbeer and Florence Davis, two in white and two 
in green; there were two maids-of-honor, the Misses 
Bernice McDonald and Wilhemina Havemeyer, costumed 
in pink silk. The bride followed last, escorted by her 
mother, who gave her away, looking very handsome in 
ber robe of white satin and voluminous tulle veil. The 
groom and his best man, his brother Richard, met the 
party at the altar, where the Rev. Robert Ritchie tied 
the nuptial knot, after which the company adjourned to 
the Hotel Metropole. Here a reception was held and 
supper served at tke-h-lite, tables decked with smilax and 
orange blossoms. Over the large table at which the bridal 
party was seated was hung a large wedding bell formed of 
orange blossoms. 

It was too bad that the tears of King Pluvius which 
ushered in the new century (?) should have proved such a 
damper on many of the events planned to welcome the 
new year, for, say as one may, a day function, particu- 
larly, is never so brilliant when a rainstorm prevails as 
when the reverse is the case. Mrs. Loughborough's tea 
was the chief event in San Francisco. Miss Leontine 
Blakeman also had a tea on Monday afternoon. The Cen- 
tury Clubhouse was en fete, the guests of honor at its New 
Year's reception being the French architect, M. Benard, 
and his wife. The large number of guests present were 
received by Mrs. Frank Symmes, the President of the 
Club, among the most prominent of whom were the Presi- 
dents of the other women's clubs, Mrs. Phoebe Hearst, 
Mayor Phelan, the French Consul and Mme. Trobriand, 
and Professor and Mrs. Benjamin Ide Wheeler and others. 
There were orchestral music and light refreshments. 



There have been many gay doings of late in army circles 
at the Presidio. Last Sunday Colonel and Mrs. Marshall 
gave an anniversary dinner, and there were many pleasant 
little re-unions at the different officer's quarters to seethe 
old year out. On Monday Colonel and Mrs. Freeman and 
Dr. and Mrs. A C. Girard kept open house afternoon and 
evening, and the crowning event was the reception on 
Tuesday evening given by the ladies of the post in honor 
itf the bride. Mrs. Parker, whose husband is an officer in 
the Sixth Cavalry. This took place in the hop room, 
which was very prettily decorated in true army style, the 
guests, owing to limited space, being confined to the army 
and navy and those connected with either branch of the 
service. Later there was dancing to the music of the 
military band till a late hour. 

Miss Hager's much-talk ed-of "baby dinner" was one of 
the events of Wednesday, and already, 'tis said, several 
other entertainments on the same line are being arranged 
for the near future. 

The ball to be given by Mrs. Homer King in honor of her 
daughter, Miss Genevieve, is one of the functions eagerly 
anticipated in the swim, and although the guests are to 
be limited to young people, the large rooms of her resi- 
dence on Leavenworth street will no doubt be crowded on 
the occasion. 

Mrs. E. P. Danforth has sent out cards for three teas 
during January; the first will be given on Thursday next, 
the 11th, the others on the eighteenth and twenty-fifth. 

Mrs. M. Ehrman held her first "at home" for the en- 
gaged couple, Miss Amy Ehrman and Arthur Bachman, 
on Thursday; the second will take place to-morrow, and 
the third on Thursday of next week. 

The already long list of Christmas tide engagement an- 
nouncements has been added to by those of Miss Helen 
Hopkins to Gus Taylor, of Miss Helen Thomas to Fred 
Kimbale of Los Angeles, of Mrs. Moore, ne'e Bareda, to 
Willis Polk, of Miss Augusta Evans to Churchill Taylor, 
and of Miss Gertrude McConnell to Arthur Finch of As- 
toria. On Wednesday of next week the wedding ceremony 
of Miss Gertrude Forman and Arthur Brander will be per- 
formed at the residence of James V. Coleman on Laguna 
street, the Rev. Father Varsi officiating. 

One of the sensations in social circles of late has been 
the announcement of Mrs. Neville Castle's approaching 
appearance with the Frawley Company, of which she has 
become a member, and the question on the lips of her ac- 
quaintances is "Why?" Is it a second case of Blanche 
Bates, and will the result be the same? Mrs. Castle as 
Miss Mary Scott showed much histrionic ability while ap- 
pearing in amateur roles, and 'tis predicted that she has 
a bright future before her on the boards. Her debut, 
which is set for next Tuesday evening in Tlie Prinass and 
the Butterfly, will no doubt be made the occasion by her 
friends of a regular "first night" demonstration. 

Mrs. J. H. Jewett will be at home on Thursdays during 
January. 

Our Large Stock of Fine 



Fur 



AND LONDON-DYED ALASKA 



Sealskin Garments 



Must be reduced within 
THIRTY DAYS . . . 



Ad. Kocour & Co. 

Fashionable Manufacturing; Furriers. 
121 Post St., Rooms 7 tO 11. 'Phone. Black 8748. 



We manufactu 

Swellest and Handsomest 



ture absolutely the ^| ■ »- H^af^ in the 
l Handsomest : I Ul MCI 1 3 olty. 

Remodeling and Repairing at Popular Prices. 



January 6, 1900. 



SAN i ITI i: 



•9 



General and Mrs. C. P. Eatfa , areberp again 

on a short risit: Jac- ,< been spending the 

Christmas holidays with his friends in San Francisco, for- 
saking for that period his ran. Nick 
Kittle has been the guest of his mother for the 
period. Mrs. V. Cittrick has returned fr.m her 
to her Bakersfield farm. 

The night before New Years was celebrated in a variety 
of ways. At the San Francisco Verein Club there was a 
vaudeville show in which, among others, Percv Kahn, Bea 
Lilienthal, Al Weil. Jack Walter, Dr. Jellinik, Mrs. Mark 
Gerstle, Miss Emily Rosinstern, and Miss Grace Hecht 
took part. This was followed by supper and then there 
was dancing for several hours. The Concordia Club was 
beautifully decorated for the New Year festivities which 
took place in the big ball, the programme including the 
Black Patti Troubadours, and a cake walk; and a very 
pretty idea was the tableau, if it might be so called, of the 
departure of the old year and the coming of the new which 
was given in the banquet hall at midnight while the guests 
were at table. There was dancing both before and after 
supper and it was far on towards morning when the de- 
lightful affair ended. 

In Oakland the New Year reception which was to have 
been given by Mrs. F. M. Smith was postponed owing to 
the sudden death of Mrs. F. W. Hall, but a very large one 
was held by Mrs. A. A. Moore who presented her son's 
bride, formerly Mrs. Florence Blythe-Hinckley, to her 
guests. The entire house was lavishly dressed with 
foliage and flowers each apartment having a distinguishing 
color though the bright holly berries were seen in all of 
them. Mrs. Moore was assisted by her daughters the 
Misses Carmen and Ethel Moore, Mrs. Pedar Sather, 
Mrs. J. J. Valentine, Mrs. H. A. Trowbridge, Mrs. A. L. 
White, Mrs. W. S. Goodfellow, Mrs. S. P. Hall, Mrs. 
Mark Requa, and the Misses Knowles, Bernice Landers, 
Martha Alexander, Ethel and Harriett Kittredge, Mary 
Baker, Bessie and Ida Belle Palmer; the Misses Jacqeline 
and Margaret Moore were in charge of the refreshment 
table placed in the dining-room, and in the hall an orches- 
tra of seven pieces dispensed music during the reception. 

Oakland society has been very gay during holiday week. 
The tea gfven by Mrs. Crellin and her daughters on 
Thursday was a very swagger affair for which the entire 
house was thrown open and beautifully decorated. The 
Misses Mona End Lena Crellin were assisted by the Misses 
Kittredge, Kellogg, Holt, Carmen Moore, Martha Alex- 
ander, Mary Baker, Florence Starr, Sarah Dunn, Jane 
Rawlings, Emma Mahoney, and Mrs. Thos. Shelley nee 
Louise Timmins, all exquisitely gowned. On Friday 
evening the Friday Night Club had a dance at Reed hall; 
Mrs. J. J. Valentine has sent out cards for Thursdays in 
January and the Thursday Night Club will have a dance 
next Thursday evening the 11th. 

The Sketch Club gave a reception on New Year's Day 
between the hours of two and ten. The affair was in the 
nature of a housewarming and the guest of honor was Mr. 
Orrin Peck the painter. Notwithstanding heavy 
showers the pretty rooms of the Sketch Club 
were crowded with friends who came to give 
good wishes for the opening of the new home. The cottage 
was most attractively decorated with red berries and 
Christmas greens; while the soft light from innumerable 
wax candles twinkling in gorgeous brass candle-sticks 
added to the effect. The tea room was a study in blue and 
white, from wall draperies to tea cups. Orrin Peck's 
"Portrait of a Lady" was one of the features of the oc- 
casion and in the evening the artist was the special guest 
of honor. Punch and tea were served the guests and the 
cheeriness within was so effective an offset to the gloom 
without, that those coming for a call remained for a social 
visit. 

The most delicious coffee, rolls, and cake, moderate 

prices, at Roemer's Original Vienna Cafe, 205 Kearny, 
near Sutter. 

A DKi.iGUTFUL Saturday to Monday trip. Napa Soda Springs 
changed hands, open all the year. A. Dollmann proprietor. A. 
Gotard chef. 

Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. Cooper & Co. 
746 Market street, San Francisco. 



Can You Tell? 

The Shortstnry Publishing Com 
pany 14. -154 High Street Boston, 
- , will p.i y m 200 in sums of $tOj 
^>oo. for clean, clever, original, i/n- 
usual stories of 500 to 6000 words 
for publication in THB BLACK CAT. 
Each story will be judged solely upon 
its merits without regard to the name 
or reputation of its writer, and the 

$4200 Rewards 

will be paid in cash. But no story will 
be considered at all unless it is sent 
strictly in accordance with the print- 
ed conditions, which will be mailed 
free, together with many of the names 
and addresses, as references, of the 
men and women in 
all parts of America 
who have received 
over $30 000 cash 
for BLACK CAT 
stories If you or 
your friends can tell 
a clever story, write at once for partic- 
ulars, as the contest closes in March 




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SAN FBANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



January 6, 1900 . 




STOLEN FROM THIEVES. 



—Maud— Oh, Ethel, I had such a nasty, spiteful anony- 
mous letter. Ethel — Whom was it from? Maud — I don't 
know; can you guess? The wicked creature says I am a 
vain, silly, frivolous, chattering, over-dressed, empty- 
headed flirtl Ethel — I really can't imagine, but (reflect- 
ing) I think it must be some one who knows you quite well. 

— Sympathetic Actress (to her "dresser") — And so the 
doctor ordered you to give your husband whisky for his 
rheumatism. Does it seem to do him any good? The 
Dresser — John says it does him lots of good, but I notice 
the pains come upon him more frequently than ever. 

— Murphy — Oi hope England knocks the stuffin' clane out 
of Kruger. O'Brien— Phwy? Murphy — Phwat roig'nt 
hez a dur-rthy Dutch haythen loike him to disgrace th' 
sthoyle av whiskers worn by th' owld Oirish kings? 

— Mrs. Snapshott (bursting into her husband's snug- 
gery) — Oh, Henry, come quick! Mamma is having a ter- 
rible fit! Mr. Snapshott (jumping up with alacrity) — I'll 
be there in a minute. Where in thunder is my kodak? 

— "Lovely," says the other girl. "Where did you 
hang your stocking?" "I didn't hang it up, "says the lucky 

one. "Then how did he put it But just then the 

bell rang and they had to hurry on to the stage. 

— Miss Bikefaoe — So you have given up advocating 
women's rights? Miss Passee— Yes, I now go in for 
women's lefts. Miss Bikepace — Women's lefts? What's 
that? Miss Passee — Widowers. 

— Mistress — Mary, where did you put my hat? Maid 
— Shure, on the head of the bed, ma'am. Mistress — Well, 
where are my slippers? Maid— On the foot of the bed, 
ma'am, to be shure I 

— A philosopher has stated that the number of thinkers 
in the world is very small, but the number of men who 
think that they are great thinkers is very large. 

— Husband — Don't cry, my darling. Wipe — But you're 
going away for six months. Husband — Well, I wouldn't 
cry if you were going away, dear. 

— The editor, poor man, has but little chance to slumber 
when a wife and fourteen children comprise his Christmas 
number. 

— A dog which is given a collar and chain and tied up 
all day and night, may fail to appreciate his Christmas 
present. 

— He — Look — quick! Jack Dashington is kissing your 
sister. She (sighing) — She always was luckier than me. 

— Miss Stronqmind — I shall never marry. Miss Cat- 
purr — Dear me! Have you lost all hope already? 

— Xmas is the day when one half the turkey world does 
not know how the other half dies. 



BANKING 



THE "OVERLAND LIMITED "[-A Solid Vestibuled Train 
Via the UNION PACIFIC leaves San Francisco daily at 8.00 a.m. 
Breakfast served in dining Car. 

Three days to Chicago without change. One day quicker than 
any other line. 

Finest modern Pullman equipment, including library and buffet 
cars and dining cars, a la carte. D. W. Hitchcock, No. 1 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco. 



ASK THE TICKET AGENT to send you from Chicago to New 
York, Boston, or other Eastern cities, over the Nickel Plate [N. 
Y. C. & St. L. R. R.] Quick time, satisfactory service and no 
extra fares charged passengers. Jay W. Adams, Pacific Coast 
Passenger Agent, 37 Crocker Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

The most comfortable way to travel to Portland and all points 
in the Northwest is by the steamers of The Oregon Railroad & 
Navigation Co., E. C. "Ward, General Agent, 630 Market street, 8. F. 



Mothers, be sure and use 
children while teething. 



Mrs. Winslow'a Soothing Syrup " lor 



London and San Francisco Bank, Limited 

Authorized Capital. «3,5O0.000. Capital Subscribed and Fully Paid, S2.450.000 

N. D- Rideout, Managing Director 

Gustav Frloderich, Cashier 

Arthur L. Black, Assistant Cashier 

HEAD OFFICE— 71 Lombard street, London, 
PORTLAND BRANCH— Chamber of Commerce Building. 
TACOMA BRANCH— 1156 Pacidc Avenue. 

Bankers—Bank of England, London Joint Stock Bank, Limited. 

Agents in New York — J. P. Morgan A Co. 
This bank is prepared to grant letters of credit available in any part of the 
world and to transact every description of banking and exchange business 

Bank of British Columbia 

S. E. oor. Bush and Sansome Sts. Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 

HEAD OFFICE: 60 Lombard St., London. 

Capital Paid Up, $3,000,000. Reserve Fund, $500,000. 

BRANCHES— Victori a, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nani- 
aino. Nelson RoBsland, Sandon, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon. 

This bank transacts a general banking business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to check, and special deposits received. Commercial credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved bills discounted and advances 
made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates upon its 
head office and branches, and upon its agents, as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago— First National Bank; 
Liverpool— North and South Wales Bank; Scotland— British Linen Com- 
pany; Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico — London Bank of Mexico; SOOTH 
America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and Japan — 
Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and New Zea- 
land — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
Ld.; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

Also on Dawson City, Yukon district, arrangements having been made 
with the Canadian Bank of Commerce whereby it is prepared to issue drafts 
and letters of credit on that bank at above point, and transact other banking 
business. Terms upon application. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital 02,500,000 Paid-Up Capital, 02,000,000 

Reserve Fund. 0850.000 

HEAD OFFICE— M Threadneedle street, London, E. C. 

AGENTS: New York — Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank, 
Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y. : Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 
Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBATJM, O. ALTSOHUL, Managers. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Pine and Sansome Sts., San Francisco. 
Jas. K. Wilson, President Wm. Pierce Johnson, Vice-President 

Lewis I. Cowoill, Cashier F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL. $500,000 

DIRECTORS- James K. Wilson, D. J. Staples. Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo. 
A. Pope. H. E, Huntington, John Barton, C. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS ; New York— Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Chemical National Bank, Boston— National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphia—Drexel & Co.; Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis 
— The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London- 
Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co. 

Germania Trust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital, $1,000,000 Paid-Up Capital and Reserve, $375,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator. Guardian, or Trustee. 
Check Accounts of individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 
Legal Depository for money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 

PAID ON TRUST DEPOSITS AND SAYINGS. INVESTMENTS carefully selected 
for our clients. 

Board of Directors— Ernst A. Denicke, F. Kronenberg, J. C. Rued, A. 
Sbarboro. F. C. Siebe, Albert G. Wieland, H. P. Sonntag, John Rapp, H. 
Brunner. 

Officers— Ernst A. Denicke, President; F. Kronenberg, vice-President : H. 
Brunner, Cashier 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cor. Pine AND Sansome Sts. 

Head Office: — 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized 06.000,000 Paid Up 01.500,000 

Subscribed 3,000.000 Reserve Fund... 700,000 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co.. 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking: business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the world. 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion. 

IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILIENTHAL, Managers. 

Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans made. 

directors. 

William Alvord S. L. Abbot, Jr. H. H. Hewlett 

William Baboock O. D. Baldwin E. J. MoCutohen 

Adam Grant W. S. Jones R. B. Pease 



January 6, 1900 



BAH l i;v - LETT! R 



31 




BANKING 



WINTER PICTURES 



- FtOM J*M18 RU8SIU LOWtU'i 
LAUHFAL-" 



THE VfStO* OF 8IK 



Down swept the chill wind from the moan tain peak, 

From the snow five thousand summers old; 
On open wold and hill-top bleak 
It had gathered all the cold, 
And whirled it like sleet on the wanderer's cheek; 
It carried a shiver everywhere 
From the unleafed boughs and pastures bare; 
The little brook heard it and built a roof 
'Neath which he could house him, winter-proof; 
AH night by the white stars' frosty gleams 
He groined his arches and matched bis beams; 
Slender and clear were his crystal spars 
As the lashes of light that trim the stars; 
He sculptured every summer delight 
In his halls and chambers out of sight; 
Sometimes his tinkling waters slipt 
Down through a frost-leaved forest-crypt, 
Long, sparkling aisles of steel-stemmed trees 
Bending to counterfeit a breeze; 
Sometimes the roof no fretwork knew 
Bat silvery mosses that downward grew : 
Sometimes it was carved in sharp relief 
With quaint arabesques of ice-fern leaf; 
Sometimes it was simply smooth and clear 
For the gladness of heaven to shine through, and here 
He had caught the nodding bulrush tops 
And hung them thickly with diamond drops, 
Which crystaled the beams of moon and sun, 
And made a star of every one. 

Within the hall are song and laughter, 

The cheeks of Christmas grow red and jolly, 
And sprouting is every corbel and rafter 

With the lightsome green of ivy and holly; 
Through the deep gulf of the chimney wide 
Wallows the Yule Jog's roaring tide ; 
The broad Same-pennons droop and flap 

And belly and tug as a flag in the wind ; 
Like a locust shrills the imprisoned sap, 

Hunted to death in its galleries blind I 
And swift little troops of silent sparks, 

Now pausing, now scattering away as in fear, 
Go threading the soot-forest's tangled darks 

Like herds of startled deer. 



TEARS.— BY UZETTE WOODWORTH REESE, IN 8CRIBNER ! 8- 

When I consider Life and its few years— 

A wisp of fog between us and the sun; 

A call to battle, and the battle done 

Ere the last echo dies within our ears; 

A rose choked in the grass ; an hour of fears ; 

The gusts that pass a darkening shore do beat; 

The burst of music down an unlistening street — 

I wonder at the idleness of tears. 

Ye old, old dead, and ye of yesternight. 

Chieftains and bards, and keepers of the sheep, 

By every cup of sorrow that you had, 

Loose me from tears, and make me see aright 

How each hath back what once he stayed to weep ; 

Homer his sight, David his little lad 1 

OUR MOTHER THE SEA.— jmm/ge francis eqan in lippincotTs- 

Long ropes of pearls the Mother Sea flings down 
To the winged emerald daughters of her heart, 
Who run in laughter and in laughter part 

Upon the beach, though clouds to westward frown ; 

Low thunders from the sunset sudden drown 
The light sea laughter, and the wavelets dart 
Back to the Mother breast, again to start, 

And weave the pearl ropes in a glittering crown : 

White foam, great waves, such virtue in you lies 
That, as you move, new essence is unrolled 
To him who, like the palm 'neath eunsick sky, 

For silver coolness and sweet grayness sighs, — 
O strong, great Mother, made to God's own mould 1 
Who does not long to kiss thee ere he die ; 



Bank of California, San Francisco 

Oftpttal, fc«- 

Profit nn.1 I ..«• A- . r 1. 1*W. tLMl.Mft 

will 1 tJH U.VORD r.. ildrni ! < M \i:i 

M 1T\ M . * I \ V Recrelarr THOMAS IlltnU N 

- PRKN I [89 Win II. \ i r Mun j. 

ooRRBBPoifDnrn 

New York -Mr«r«, Ijddlaw At 0o.j tin* Bttk <■* Haw York, N n \. 
luitlmorr -The National Rxohanca Hunk. Bo hnwmiit 

Rank, rhtmiro IIHihiI- Tm.t a.,. I Sfcvfnci Hank : Union National Hm.k 

Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Brink. <*t. I iinnk 

Virginia CHr. Ncr. tffttnoy of The Bank ■•( Cattfornln 
N. M. Rothschild A Son*. Pari* Memr*. do Rnlhwhl 
Direction der Dtooonto Qoaellsohaft. China, Jai 

tcrrd Hunk of India. AnMralin, and China, Australia and New Zeahuii 

Union Hank ol Australia, Ltd.. and Hank -d Npu Zealand, 
LeUen ol credit bvuad avaUable in aD parts ol th« world. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

532 CALIFORNIA STREET. S. K. 

Daposfta July 1. 1809, 924,119 I, Reaarva Fund f2m'2ift 

Taid-np Capital 1.000,000 Oontlnsenl Kund 149,789 

E. B. POND. President W. C. R. DeFREMERY. Vloe-Pnsidenl 

LOVELL white. Oaahler it. M. WELCH, Aaristanl 0b i 

I>Irectnrs— Ocorirc W. Hcavrr. Thomaa Mneec. W. f*. B. dr. Frcm.rv. AJ- 
br.rl Mil Irr, Robert Watt. Geonre C. Boardman. Daniel E. Martin, Qcoreo 
Tashcira. E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
lands In the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may lie made In checks payable 
In San Francisco, Post Office, or Wells Fareo & Co.'s Money Orders, or ooln 
hy Express, hut the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charere is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: a. m. to 3 p. m., and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6;30 to 8 o'clock. 

Wells Fargo X Co. Bank 

N. E. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

JOHN J. VALENTINE. President H. WADSWORTH. Cashier 

HOMER S. KINO, Manajrer F. L. LIPMAN. Assistant Cashier 

H. L. MILLER, Second Assistant Cashier. 

Cash Capital and Surplus $6,250,000 

Branches — New York City, H. B. Parsons. Cashier: Salt Lake City, J. E. 

Dooly, Cashier: Portland, Or., R. M. Dooly, Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— John J. Valentine. Andrew Christcson, Oliver Eldridee, 

Henry E. Hun tine-ton. Homer S. King, George E. Gray. John J. McCook, 

John Bermingham, Dudley Evans. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital 81,000,000. Paid Up Capital $300,000 

James D. Phelan. President S. G. Murphy, Vice-President 

George A. Story, Cashier John A. Hooper. Vice-President 

C. B. Horson, Assistant Cashier. 

"Rate of Interest on Loans secured by Improved 
San Francisco Real Estate - - SIX PER CENT 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 
Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells. Farco & Co., or Exchange on 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CAMFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 82,187.617.90 

Capital actually paid up in Cash 1,000 000,00 

Deposits June 30. 1899 27 656 513.03 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President, B. A. Becker: First Vice-President 
Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstman: Cashier, A. H. R. 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann: Secretary, George Tourny 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller; General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

ten. Steinhart. E. Rohte, H. B. Russ, D. N. Walter. N. Ohlnndt, and John 
Lloyd. 

Continental Building X Loan Association 

OF CALIFORNIA. 
Established in 1889. 222 Sansome St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Subscribed Capital. ..88,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund. ..8175,000 

Paid -in- Capital 1,300.000 Monthly Income, over 75,000 

Dr. Ed. E. Hill. President Oapt. Oliver Eldridqe. Vice-President 

Wm. Corbin, Secretary and General Manager 

Crocker-WoolWorth National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Corner Market, Montgomery, and Post Sts. 

Paid-up-Capital 81,000,000 

Wm. H. Crocker, President Geo. W. Kline. Cashier 
W. E. Brown, Vice-President W. Gregg, Jr., Assistant Cashier 
Directors— W. H. Crocker, E.B. Pond, W. E. Brown, C. E. Green, G. W. 
Kline, Henry J. Crocker, G. W. Scott. 

Worthington Ames 

Jlember Stock and Bond Exchange 

Broker In Stock*, Bonds, and Municipal Securities 

Safe Deposit Building, 324 Montgomery ■treet. Telephone Main 1381 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 6, 1900. 




murine: DEmBimarav 




Capital Subscribed $4,482,760 

LONDON ASSURANCE. capital paia u P 2.241,375 

Assets 19.195.146 

Capital Subscribed ... $5,000,000 

OCEAN MARINE. Capital Paid Up 500,000 

Assets 2,602,050 

ANNUAL MEETING • 

Bullion Mining Company. 
The regular annual meetine of the stockholders of the Bullion Mi nine: 
Company will be held at the office of the company, room 11, 331 Pine St., 
San Francisco, Cal., on 

THURSDAY, THE 11th DAY OF JANUARY. 1900, 
at the hour of 1 o'clock p. m., for the purpose of electing; a Board of Direc- 
tors to serve for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other busi- 
ness as may come before the meeting. 

R. R. GRAYSON. Secretary. 
Oflice: Room 11, 331 Pine street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ANNUAL MEETING- 
Spring Valley Water Works. 

The annual meeting: of the stockholders of the Spring Valley Water 
Works will be held at the office of the company. No. 126 Stockton street, San 
Francisco, Cal., at 12 o'clock m., on 

WEDNESDAY, thb 10th DAY OF JANUARY, 1900, 
to elect trustees to serve for the ensuing year and the transaction of such 
other business as may come before the meetinc 

PELHAM W. AMES, Secretary. 
Office: No. 126 Stockton street, San Francisco, Cal. 



DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

San Francisco. December 29, 1899. 
At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this society, held 
this day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of three and one-Quarter 
(3%) P er cent per annum on all deposits for the six months ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1899, free from all taxes and payable on and after January 1, 1900. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 
Office: Corner Market, McAllister and Jones streets, San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE, 
Security Savings Bank. 

For the half year ending December 30, 1899, dividends on term deposits at 
the rate of three and six-tenths (3 6-10) percent per annum and on ordinary 
deposits at the rate of three (3) per cent per annum, free of taxes, will be 
payable on and after January 3. 1900. S. L. ABBOT, Jr., Secretary. 

Office — 222 Montgomery street. Mills Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Continental Building and Loan Association of California. 
The Continental Building and Loan Association of California has declared 
for the six months ending December 31, 1889, a dividend of 12 per cent per 
annum to class "A" stock, 10 per cent per annum to Class "F" stock, 6 per 
cent per annum on Term Deposits, and 5 per cent per annum on Ordinary 
Deposits. 

Capt. Oliver Eldridge, President. William Corbin, Secretary. 
Office: 222 Sansome street. San Francisco. Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending December 31. 1899, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of three (3) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Tuesday, January 2. 1900. 

GEO. A. STORY. Cashier. 

Office: 33 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 
The Board of Directors declared a dividend for the term ending December 
31, 1899, at the rate of three and sixty one-hundredths (3 60) per cent per an- 
num on Term Deposits, and three (3) per cent per annum on Oxdinars De- 
posits, free of taxes, and payable on and after January 2. 1900. Dividends 
not called for are added and to bear the same rate of dividend as the principal 
from and after January 1, 1900. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY. Cashier. 
Office: 101 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The German Savings and Loan Society, 
For the half year ending December 31, 1899, a dividend bus been declared 
at the rate of four (4) per cent, per annum on Term Deposits, and three and 
one-third (3%) per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Tuesday. January 2, 1900. GEO. TOURNY, Secretary." 
Oflice; 526 California street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
San Francisco Savings Union. 

For the half year ending with the 31st of December, 1899, a dividend ha 
been declared at the rate per annum of three and three-fourths (354) pe 
cent, on term deposits, and three and one-eighth ('■'>%} per cent, on ordinary 
deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Tuesday. January 2, 1900. 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 

Office: 532 California street, corner Webb, San Francisco, Cal. 



IMSURAMGE. 



THE Town Clerk of Sunderland, England, is about as 
foolish as some of the most foolish of our backwoods 
legislature when it comes down to a question of insurance. 
He has issued a circular letter asking that it be submitted 
to each town council and that he be informed whether the 
town council in question would concur in a petition to the 
government in favor of the promotion of a "Little Bill," 
which bill shall provide for the payment of one-half of the 
cost of the maintenance of the Fire Brigade in each city 
by the companies doing business therein. He says as his 
excuse, "The actual cost of extinguishing fire is a small 
matter as compared with the permanent expenditure in 
curred in the establishment and maintenance of the fire 
brigade with fire engines and appliances. The whole of 
which falls upon the rate payers." He then goes on and 
says that his committee is of the opinion that this perma- 
nent expenditure being in effect largely protective of the 
inttrests of the insurance companies, it is but reasonable 
they should bear a portion of the cost from which they are 
so benefited. It is a pity that his "committee" cannot 
send him to interview Henry Evans and President Moore 
upon the beauties of the universal schedule, and it is also 
sad that he cannot have laid before him the experiences of 
some American companies who have written in non-pro- 
tected towns upon a basis rate of a protected city. He 
fails to see that whoever dances must pay the piper, and 
it is sad that a man of such brilliant intellect is not able to 
flock with some of the managers in this country who be- 
lieve that dividends can be paid, and losses also, where 
policies are sold below their cost, and further, that fire 
insurance companies are a source of all profit and no loss. 
Mr. Town Clerk of Sunderland, come out to this land of 
the West, and run an endowment and bond fake, or an 
assessment and life scheme. 

Bernard Faymonville, Vice-President of the Piremans 
Fund, has returned from his Eastern trip. 

Leslie A. Wright, assistant general agent of the Sun, 
under J. B. F. Davis & Son, has resigned. 

The annual meeting of the stockholders of the Cali- 
fornia Insurance Company will be held on the 15th 
inst. at 214 Pine street. 

Insurance Commissioner Clunie licensed January 2nd in 
California the Netherlands Fire Insurance Company of The 
Hague; capital. $1,600,000; deposits in the United States, 
$400,000. Col. Wm. Macdonald, manager, and Col. D. E. 
Miles, assistant manager. 

Geo. C. Pratt, auditor of the New Amsterdam Casualty 
Company, has left on a tour of Italy and the Continent. 
Upon his return to the United States he will assume his 
duties at the home office of the company in New York. 

In Great Britain figures have been adduced, showing 
that ordinary life insurance offices expend 14.35 per cent, 
of premiums on management and commission account, 
while in industrial offices the same expenses amount to 
43.25 per cent. 

Everybody knows Col. L. L. Bromwell, and most people 
among the insurance men know his office is situated be- 
low the sidewalk. On Thursday last, while he was busy 
sitting as usual with his back to the street, a horse and 
buggy came down the steps at a finish gait. The buggv 
remained outside, but the horse, showing his good-breed- 
ing, and desiring, no doubt, to pay the Colonel the regula- 
tion New Year's call, opened the door and poked his head 
in over the Colonel's shoulder, giving him the compliments 
of the season and a scare at the same time in a horse 
laugh. The Colonel admitted it was a horse on him, and 
washed it down accordingly. 

A. R D. Patterson, special agent for the Northwest for 
the Sun Insurance Office, with headquarters at Portland, 
is in the city. 

Do you know that Smith's Dandruff Pomade has cured thousands 
of cases of dandruff, itching scalp, eczema and falling hair when all 
other remedies have failed ? Price 60c at all druggists. Sample Free. 
Address Smith Bros.. Fresno, Cal. 



The time is rife to have your carpets taken up and made clean and 
new. Nothing so dangerous to health and appearances as unclean 
carpets. The Spauldmg Carpet Cleaning Works, 353 Tehama street, 
employs expert artisans and uses special machinery. Quick work 
and easy prices. 



January 6. 1900. 



SAN ] IT I K 



»3 



EL K. Field, of the New Knjflaml Life, gave hi- 
pany a larger increase for the year, and the 
cerobor business from California, that the compa- 
ceivcd from any section. 

The annual meeting of the Firemans Fund Insurance 
Company will be held January- lfith. Owing to tin 
that the resignation of President S. J. Staples took effect 
with the New Year. W. J Potion, the former Vice- 
President, was elected by the directors to fill the unex- 
pired term, at the end of which he will unquestionably 
succeed himself. 

The Milwaukee Mechanics Insurance Company, L. L. 
Bromwell, manager, gave to its agents for a Christmas 
Souvenir a card case and memorandum book combined, 
which is a pretty and useful remembrance. 

Amongst the calendars of the season, H. C. Aphel A 
Company representing the Northern, National andSpring- 
field, issued their regulation "calendar of six master- 
pieces," each one being a photogravure reproduction of 
some well known painting. This is a distinctly unique 
idea, each sheet being worthy of a frame. 

W. P. Thomas of the New Zealand issued a steel en- 
graved and embossed card, with the compliments of the 
season. 

The New England Mutual followed their regular idea: a 
steel engraving. 

The Mutual Life issued an odd calendar and also a use- 
ful pad tablet of memorandum sheets. 

The Firemans Fund Insurance Company remembered 
their agents and friends with its usual solid silver memento. 
This time in the shape of a combination lead pencil and 
envelope opener. It is like the company itself, Sterling. 

The following is aged — but it is so good that it is worthy 
of re-publication: "Gainesville, 6a. To the managers, 
general and special agents of every insurance company in 
the wide, wide world: We, the undersigned agents of 
Gainesville, Ga., have just completed a very successful 
warfare on our own business, and take this means of ad- 
vising you that a rate war in the insurance business in a 
small town is hell. Very truiy yours Signed by all 

agents in Gainesville. Mr. C , who has no business 

left, will not sign. He says he objects to the word 'hell.' 
He agrees, however, that it is ruinous." 

CHICAGO IN THREE DAYS 
Via Chicago. Union Pacific and Northwestern Line every day in the 
year from San Francisco at 8:30 a. m. Buttet, smoking, library cars, 
with barber. Double drawing-room sleeping cars. Dining cars — 
meals a la carte. Breakfast in Diner on leaving Oakland Pier. 
Daily through tourist car to Chicago without change at 6:30 p. m. 
R. E. Ritchie. General agent Pacific Coast, 2 New Montgomery 
treet, (Palace Hotel) San Francisco. 

Ladies do not have to wear switches to cover up their defects if 
they use Smith's Dandruff Pomade in time, it cures dandruff, itch- 
ing scalp, stops falling bair and makes hair grow. Price 50c at all 
druggists 

Ali.en'8 Press Clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
deals in all kinds of newspaper information, business, personal, political, 
from press of State, coast and country. Tel. Main 1042 

THE CALIFORNIA HOTEL. Dinner.— Sunday, Jan. 7, isoo. 

Grape Fruit nil Ruin. 

Soup. — Clear Green Turtle aux Xerzes; Consomme a la Dumas. 

Hobs D'OEuvres.— Celeiy en Brnnche; Olives: Salted Almonds; Mangoes. 

Fish.— Boiled Turbot. Sauce Dieppoise: Fried Filet of Sole, Sauce Veni- 
tienne; Pomnies Parisiennes, 

Boiled. — Dupce Ham with Spinach. 

Entrees.— Eastern Oysters, Fancy Roast; Friands of Game, Sauce Peri- 
gueux; Larded Tenderloin of Beef aux Champignons: Pineapple and 
Cream a la Chantilly. 

Roast. — Prime Ribs of Beef au.Tus: Saddle of Southdown Mutton, Currant 
Jelly: Stuffed Chicken au Cresson. Punch— Lalla Rookh, 

Vegetables. — Browned Sweet, Boiled and Mashed Potatoes: Boiled Rice; 
Brussels Sprouts: Asparagus, Sauce Moussellne; Sugar Peas, 

Cold Meats— Roast Beef: Suckling Pig; Smoked Beef Tongue: Ham. 

Salads. — Lettuce; Chicory; Escaroll; Lobster Mayonnaise. 

Dessert. — Steamed Fig Pudding, Hard and Brandy Sauce ; Mince Pic ; Cus- 
tard Pie; Champagne Jelly; Vanila Ice Cream; Assorted Nuts. Cluster 
Raisins; Assorted Cakes: American, Cream, Edam, and Roquefort 
Cheese: Fruit in Season; Smyrna Figs; Tea and Coffee. 

Dishes not on this menu can be ordered at restaurant prices. Dinner 6 to 8 p.m 

R. H. Warfield & Co.. Proprietors. 

ANNUAL MEETING 
Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 
The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Sierra Nevada Sil- 
ver Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, room No. 14, 
Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cai., on 

WEDNESDAY, THE 17th DAY OF JANUARY, 1900, 
at the hour of 1 o'clock p. m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Diiect- 
ore to serve for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other business 
as niny come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Monday. Jan- 
uary 15th. at 3 o'clock p. m. E. L. PARKER, Secretary. 
Office— Room 14, Nevada block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cai. 



INSURANCE 



FIRE, MARINE. AND INLAND INSURANCE 

FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO. GAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000 Assets, $3,500,000 



PALATINE 

UWUUAK0B COMPACT (Limited) OF MAlfOHBSnEB i»,mnh 

SOLID SECURITY OVER $9.000 000 RESOURCES 

i MAS. A. LATON. Manager, 439 California street. S. F. 
FIRE INSURANCE 



Founded A. D. I7SB 

Insurance Oompany of / lorth America 

OK PHILADELPHIA. 

Paid-up Capital 13,000,000 

Surplus to Polloy Holders 16.032,010 

JAMES D. BAILE Y. General Agent, 412 California street. S. P, 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated b> Royal Charter, A. D. 1720 

Capital Paid Dp, 83,410.100 Assets. (24,034. 11 0.35 

Surplus to Policy Holders. S9.612. 455.96 

FRANK \V. DICKSON. Manager 

501-503 Montgomery street, corner Sacramento 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Gompany 

ok New Zealand 
Capital. $5,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office in company's building, 312 California street 



Hooker & Lent. City Agents, 14 Post street 



W. P. THOMAS, Manager 



Phoenix Assurance Co., of London 

Established 1782 

Providence-Washington Insurance Company 

Incorporated 1799 



BUTLER & HALDAN. General Agents 



413 California street. S. F. 



Connecticut Fire Insurance Go 

OF HARTFORD 

Capitol Paid Up 91,000.000 

Total Assets 3,702,300 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2, 112. .Mi; 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH. Manager 
COLIN M. BOYD, San Francisco agent, 411 California street. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co 

(Limited) OF LIVERPOOL 

Capital 86.700,000 

B ALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents 316 California street, S. F. 

The Thuringia Insurance Gompany 

of ERFURT. GERMANY 

Capital. 82,250,000 Assets $10,984,248 

VOSS. CONRAD & CO., General Managers 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome street, S. F. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany 
N. 8CH1.ESINGER, City Agent 304 Montgomery street, San Francisco 

Western Mutual Investment Co, *w.kb*sum 

$2 Pc- Month 
415-416 Safe DepOBit Building, Montgomery mid California streets, San 
Francisco. Agents Wanted, 



Southern Pacific Co.»Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are due to arrive at SAN FRANCI8C0: 
[Main Line, Foot of Market Street] 

leave] From December 15, 1899 [arrive 

*7:00a Benicia, Suisun, Elmira, Vaenville, Rumsey, and Sacramento.. *7:45 P 

*7:00A Shasta Express— Davis, Willows, Red Bluff, Portland *7:45 p 

*7:30a Martinez. San Ramon, Vnllejo, Napa, Calistoga, Santa Rosa *6:15 p 

"8:30 a The Overland Limited— Ogden. Denver, Omaha. Chicago *5:15 P 

*8:30A San Jose, Livermore, Stockton, lone, Sacramento, Placerville, 

Marysville, Cliico, Red Bluff. *4:15 p 

*8:30 a *Milton, Onkdale, and Sonora *4:15 p 

*9:00 a Haywards, Niles. and way stations *'11:45 A 

*9:00A Davis, Woodland, Knights Landing, Marysville, Oroville. *7:45 p 

♦9;00a Atlantic Express, Ogden and East *9:45 a 

*9:00 A Martinez, Tracy, Lathrop, Stockton, Merced and Fresno *12: 15 p 

*9:00 a Port Costa, Fresno, Mojave and Lbs Angeles *6:45 p 

*1O:O0a Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations *G:45 p 

*11:00a Haywards, Niles, and way stations *2:45 p 

*12:O0m Niles, Livermore, Stockton, Sacramento, Mendota, Hanford, 

Visalia, Porterville *4:15 p 

tl:00p Sacramento River Steamers f8:00 p 

*3:00p Hay wards, Niles and way stations *5:45 p 

*4:00p Martinez, Sun Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Calistoga, Santa Rosa *9:15 A 

°4:00p Benicia, Vacaville, Sacramento, Woodland, Knight's Landing: 

Marysville, Oroville *10:45 A 

*4:30p Niles, San Jose, and Stockton ''7:15 p 

♦5:00 p The Owl Limited, Tracy, Fresno, Bakersneld, Saugua for 

Simla Barbara, Los Angeles *10:45 a 

fl5:00 p Sunset Limited— El Paso, New Orleans and East cl0:45 a 

"5;:fflp Stockton, Merced, Fresno *12:15 P 

*5:30 P Fresno, Bakersneld, SantaBarbara. Los Angeles, Doming, El 

Paso, New Orleans, and East *8:45 A 

*5:30f Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, for Mojave andEast *6:45 p 

♦6:00 p Hay wards, Niles, and San Jose *7:45 A 

t6:30p Vallejo *12:15 p 

*6:30p Oriental Mail— Ogden and East *8:50 p 

$7:00 P Vallejo, Port Costa, and way stations t9:55 p 

*8:05 P Oregon and California Express, Sacramento, Marysville, Red- 
ding, Portland Puget Sound and East *8:15 a 

Coast Division (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

*8:15a Newark, Centerville, San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and waystations *5:50 P 

t2:15p Newark, Centerville, San Jose, New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations fl0:50 A 

**4:15P Newark, San JoBe, Los Gatos *9:20 A 

611:45 P Hunters' Excursion, San Jose and waystations t7:20 P 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— *7:15, 9:00, and 11:00 
a. m.. tl:00, *2:00, t3:00, *4:00, t5:0aand*6:00P. M. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway.— *6:00, 8:00, 10:00 A. M.; tl2:00, 1:00 
J2 :00, *3 :00, $4 :00, *5 :00 p. m. 

Coast Division (Broad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets). 

+6:10A Ocean View, South San Francisco t6:30 p 

*7:00a San Jose and way stations (New Almaden Wednesday only) *1:30 p 

*9:O0a San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, PasoRobles. 

San Luis Obispo, Surf, Lompoc, and principal waystations *4:10 P 

*10:40a San Jose and way stations. *6:35 A 

*ll:30 a San Jose and waystations *5:30 P 

t2:45 P San Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park, Palo Alto, Santa Clara, San 
Jose.Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, and Pacific 

Grove fl0:36 A 

|3:30p San Jose and WayStations «7:30 p 

T4:15P San Jose and Principal Way Stations *9:45 A 

T5:00p San Jose and Principal Way Stations f9:00 A 

*5:30p San Jose and Principal Way Stations *"8:35 A 

*6:30p San Jose and Way Stations tS:00 A 

611:45 p San Jose and Way Stations *7:30 P 

A for Morning. P for Afternoon. * Daily. t Sundays excepted. 

tSundaysonly. 6 Saturdays only. 

a Tuesdays and Fridays. c Thursdays and Sundays. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and other 
information. 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 




Steamers leave Broadway 
Wharf, San Francisco. 

For Alaskan ports, 10 a. m. Jan. 1, 6, 11, 16, 21, 26, 31 ; Feb. 5 
change to company's steamers at Seattle. 

For B. C. and Puget Sound Ports, 10 A. m.. Jan. 1, 6, 11, 16, 
21, 26, 31 ; Feb. 5, and every fifth day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay) 2 p.m., Jan. 4,9,14,19,24, 
29 ; Fe I ►. B. and every fifth day thereafter. 
For Newport (Los Angeles) and way ports, 9 A. M. Jan. 
3, 7, 11, 15, 19, 23, 27, 31 ; Feb. 4, and every fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, Santa Barbara, Port Los 
Angeles, Reclondo, (Los Angeles) 11 A. M„ Jan. 1,5,9,13,17,21,25,29; Feb. 2, 
and every fourth day thereafter. 
For Mexican ports, 10 a m.. 7th of each month. 
For further information obtain company's folder. 

The company reserves the right to change steamers, sailing dates, and 
hours of sailing without previous notice. 

TICKET 0FFIC E— No. 4 New Montgomery street. (Palace Hotel .) 

G00DALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen.Agts., 10 Market St., San Francisco 

SS " Australia," Wednesday. Jan. 10, 1900, 2 p. m. 
SS " Moana," Wednesday, Jan. 24, at 8 p. m. 
Line to Coolgardie, Australia, and Cape town, South 
Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS CO 
Agents, 114 Montgomery St. Freight oflice, 327 
Market St., San Francisco. 



[ANIC 




California Northwestern R'y Co. 

LESSEE 

San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tibcron Feebv— Foot of Market Street 

WEEK DAYS— 7:30,9:00, 11:00 a.m; 12:35, 3:30. 5:10, 6:30 p. M. Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11:30 p.m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:50 and 11 :30 p.m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A. M.; 1:30, 3:30, 5:00, 6:20 p. M. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:10.7:50,9:20,11:10 A. M.: 12:45. 3:40, 5:10 p. M. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1 :55 and 6:35 p. M. 

SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 a.m.;1:40,3:40, 5:05, 6:25 p. m. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave San Francisco 


In Effect Oct. 15, 1899 


Arrive in San Francisco 


Week days 1 Sundays 


Destinations 


Sundays 1 Week days 


7:30 am 
3:30 pm 
5:10 pm 


8:00 am 
9:30 AM 
5:00 PM 


Novato 
Petaluma 
Santa Rosa 


10:40 am 
6:05 PM 
7:35 pm 


8:40 AM 
10:25 AM 
6:22 pm 


7:30 am 
3:30 pm 


8:00 AM 


Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdsbur?, Lytton, 

Geyserville, Cloverdale 


7:35 pm 


10:25 AM 

6:22 pm 


7:30 AM | 8:00 AM | Hopland, TJkiah | 7;35 pM | 6 . 22 pM 


7:30 AM 1 8:00 AM 1 Gn-mnvHIn 1 7:35 PM 1 10:25 AM 

S;30 pm 1 1 Guerneville | | 6:22 pM 


7:30 AM 1 8:00 am 1 Sonoma 1 10:40 AM l 8:40 am 
5:10 pm 1 5:00 pm I Glen Ellen | 6:05 pm I 6:22 pm 


7:30 AM I 8:00 AM 1 <j„ho..„r, n l 1 10: <° ■*« 1 10:25 AM 
3:30 PM | 5:00 PM I beDastopol | 7;35 pM | 6;22 pM 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs and White Sulphur 
Springs; at Lytton for Lytton Springs; at Geyserville for Skaggs' Springs; at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers ; at Hopland for Duncan Springs, Highland Springs 
Kelseyville, Carlsbad Springs, Soda Bay, Lakeport, and Bartlett Springs; at 
Ukiah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake, 
Witter Springs, Upper Lake, Pomo, Potter Valley, John Day's, Riverside, 
Lierley's, Bucknell's, Sanhedrin Heights, Hullville, Booneville, Philo, 
Christine Soda Springs, Navarro, Whitesboro, Albion, Little River, Orr's 
Springs, Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, Westport, TJsal Willits, Laytonville, 
Curamings, Bell's Springs, Harris, Olsen's, Dyer, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 
TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 



H. C. WHITING. Gen. Manager. 



R. X. RYAN, Gen. Pass. Agent. 



CALIFORNIA LIMITED 

The fastest train running over the 
best railroad, with the highest class 
accommodations. Connecting train 
leaves San Francisco at 5 p. m. . , , 

Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, 

Arriving in Chicago at 2:15 p. m. 

Friday, Sunday, Tuesday, Wednesday. 

Overland Express 

Every day in the year. Pullman Palace and 
Upholstered Tourist Cars leave for Denver, 
Kansas City, Chicago, and the East. Take 
Market street ferry at 5.30 p. m. 



Santa Fe 
Route 



Valley Road 



Weak Men and Women 



Should use Damiana Bitters, 
the great Mexican remedy; 

it gives health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 323 Market 

street San Francisco. Send for circular. 



Between Stockton, Fresno, Hanford, Visalia 
Tulare and Bakersfield, furnishes good loca, 
train service. 

San Franciseo Office: 628 Market street; telephone Main 1531. 

Oakland Office : 1118 Broadway. 

Jno. L. Truslow, General Agent Passenger Department, San Franciseo. 

Jno. J. Byrne, General Passenger Agent, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIUST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p. m„ for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG, 

calling at Kobe (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hongkong 
with steamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Saturday, January 6, 1900 

Doric (via Honolulu) Thursday, February 1, 1900 

Coptic (via Honolulu).. Tuesday, February 27, 1900 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Friday, March 23,1900 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market Btreet 
corner First. D. D. STUBBS, General Manager. 

Oregon Short Line 

Only two days to Butte. 
Shortest line to Utah, 
Idaho and Montana Points. 



D. W. HITCHCOCK, General Agent, 
1 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 



/ViM i-r fmpr 3S Mil 




esTABLiSMeo wucr 30. ies« 



A fM.nl SalmlftU*. It 



NEWS; BETTER 

(ftalif *r nilHA^Jbuerti sjcr. 




To/. Z.V 



5i4flT FRANCISCO. JANUARY 13, 1900. 



Number 2. 



Printed and published every Saturday by the proprietor. FRED MARHIOTT 
Kcamy street. Man Francisco. Entered nt San Francisco 
ofttca a# ficcond-alaas Mutter. 

- I OTTER In New York Oily is at Xtl Park How 

I A. Marriott Rutera RaproaantaUve)i when information 

may he obtained regarding subscription mid advertising rate*. 

il item*, announcement*, advertising, or other matter. Intended lor 
■acalion In the current number ol the NKWS LETTER, should ba 
iot Inter thnn six o'clock Thursday afternoon. 

THE soldier foot-pad is the latest criminal freak to en- 
gage the attention of the police. 

EVEN Mr. Atkinson never counseled the Filipinos to 
murder American prisoners. 

IT is necessary to state that the politician recently shot 
in the neck received the wound externally. 

THE re-appearance of "Nobby" Clarke goes far towards 
bolstering up the theory of resurrection. 

SENILE and doddering lovers hereabouts are finding 
that to propose and run away calls for cash another 
day. 

SENATOR Pettigrew has only to get his tongue 
patented to have a cinch on the perpetual motion 
prize. 

POSSIBLY Tax Collector Sheehan desired to remain in 
office so as to vindicate himself of the aspersion that 
his accounts were short. 



THE Call's story that Chief Lees had taken the rogue's 
gallery from the City Hall, was just one of the 
"Call'so wn" brand of scoops. 

THERE should in justice be more deaths from Christian 
Science than there are. Assassins who employ this 
method uniformly escape hanging. 

IF correspondent Creelman is in Africa, Rhodes will have 
no trouble in securing natural gas wherewith to inflate 
the balloon in which he expects to leave Kimberley. 

" M ^" QUAY has a clean record and is highly re- 
"\, spected by Senators." This statement is from the 
correspondence of a local paper. It is reproduced merely 
as a curio. 



TWO citizens of Sacramento are quarreling as to which 
is Mayor. It really seems a small thing to fuss about. 
Think of the honor and satisfaction of not being Mayor of 
Sacramento. 

SEVEN Boers who shot at English doctors were stood 
up in a neat row and simultaneously and permanently 
reformed. Civilized warfare is bound to command recog- 
nition even by ungentle means. 

CORONER COLE brings into office the novel theories 
that the dead and the wishes of the living are both 
worthy of respect. Doubtless the old gang will try to 
have him indicted or mandamused or something. 

THE elopement of a seventeen-year-old boy with a 
thirty-five year old woman already supplied with a 
full-grown husband, would have been strange enough to 
excite comment had it occurred anywhere but in Oakland. 

POSTMASTER Friend of Oakland has decided not to 
close the postoffice on Sundays. He has discovered 
that there are more persons who want their mail on that 
day than there are who wish to go to church. 



THE un-starred Hibernians of America are hoping that 
Uncle Sam will assist the Boers. The starred of the 
breed are being drilled to put down Fenian riots. The 
star makes all the difference in the world with an Irish- 
man. 

JUST before bringing suit for divorce an Oakland 
preacher spoke fervently from the text: "The bed is 
too short and the covering is too narrow." It would seem 
that such trifling deficiencies might have been remedied 
by any first-class furnishing house. 

POLITICIANS of distinction and office-holders of place 
thundered pro-Boer eloquence at the Metropolitan 
Hall last Saturday night. The question naturally arises: 
How much would they have thundered had there been 
fewer Irish and more English voters in San Francisco. 

SN English failure on the Tugela river is the signal for 
financial disaster on Wall street. A Boer defeat is 
followed immediately by restored confidence. Americans 
with eyes that see will not have far to look to discover 
which nation is the most closely allied with our own; with 
which people the Interests of Americans lie. 



THE humor of the pro-Boer agitator is unfathomable. 
For instance, the Reverend Father Caraher told us 
recently: "It would be entirely wrong to say the English, 
Scotch, or Welsh people believe in this war." We are 
also led to understand that the Irish do not. Consequently 
we are left in a maze of bewilderment as to who is really 
carrying on the conflict. 

KRUGER'S relatives seem to be multiplying marvel- 
ously in this country. It is a fine advertising idea to 
represent yourself as a niece or an uncle or some other 
connection of the crafty Oom Paul. Then, though you may 
never have set foot in the Transvaal, you will be allowed 
to address public meetings, appear on the vaudeville 
stage, and generally to pose before the unthinking mob as 
a hero or heroine who deserves meritorious recognition. 



RECENTLY announcement was made that the daugh- 
ter of General Miles was about to marry her cousin. 
The subject was treated as though a matter for congratu- 
lation. In the same paper containing this news was the 
account of a divorce suit brought because a husband and 
wife had discovered that the blood bond of cousinship ex- 
isted between them. Which shows that in the making of 
a world several kinds of people are required. 

THE Transvaal war has added yet another item to the 
complicated equipment of the modern soldier. In 
these days of long-range rifles, a pair of powerful field 
glasses is an absolute necessity, if any good shooting is 
to be done. Such a small object as a man cannot be dis- 
cerned with the naked eye at the range of a mile or more, 
and the accurate long-distance shooting of the Boers is 
attributed to the fact that every burgher carries a good 
pair of binoculars. 

THE ignorance of the average Hibernian orator is only 
equaled by his enthusiasm. At the pro-Boer meeting 
the other night, one self-styled patriot, in the course of a 
tirade against the brutal Sassenach, accused England of 
having crushed the life and liberty out of Scotland. This 
will be news indeed to most Scotchmen. Probably the 
speaker had never even heard of the treaty of Union, 
accepted by both nations in 1702, by which Scotland retains 
in the fullest measure all her ancient laws and customs 
together with full representation in the Imperial Parlia- 
ment. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 13, 1900. 



ALL EYES ON THE FIELD OF BATTLE. 



WARS are now being fought under a microscope 
through which all eyes may look. It was cot always 
so. It took London three davs to learn the result of 
Waterloo, and for weeks after the event, parts of the 
United States did not know of the surrender of Cornwallis. 
The great battle of New Orleans was actually fought and 
won after a treaty of peace bad been signed. There was 
little opportunity in those day of criticising generals, and 
none of watching individual officers, both of whom were 
therefore left free to pursue their own plans, and do the 
best they could with the forces and means at their com- 
mand. To-day all this is changed, and not for the better, 
so far as successful warfare is concerned. Generals fight 
under showers of detailed criticism, and officers hear the 
shouts of the "folks at home" almost as clearly as the 
roar of the batteries. It is almost impossible for Generals 
to feel independent, or for officers to forget that millions 
of eyes are following them, and that if they are recklessly 
daring millions of voices will applaud. Correspondents by 
the dozen are present in all camps. The smallest moves 
are reported as soon as made. The cables so annihilate 
distance that news even two days old is considered be- 
lated, while the competition among journals is so fierce 
that nothing reaches the public except in overdrawn and 
misleading forms. Skirmishes are described as battles, 
petty defeats as disasters, ordinary movements as 
stupendous efforts, and unavoidable losses as shocking 
destructions of human life, as if war could ever be waged 
without slaughter, or as if a preventable epidemic would 
not slay ten times as many as a war. All this produces a 
degree of nervous tension ou the part of the people that 
reacts upon the officers in the field, and tends to the for- 
mation of immature plans, and to failure in their execution. 
It also leads to fears on the part of the people that are 
groundless, and to the cherishing of expectations that 
can Dever be realized. Last week, for instance, we all 
believed that Aguinaldo was on the point of being caught; 
that his army was dispersed, and the war practically 
over; to-day we know that the Filipinos are back in Cavite 
in greater numbers than ever, that there is danger of a 
revolt in Manila, and that no man can tell whether the 
war has yet fairly begun or not. We have not yet met 
the 200,000 Mussulmans in Mindanao. England, on the 
other hand, is unduly alarmed by the overdrawn accounts 
that reach ber. Her officers are holding their ground, 
relief is pouring in from all sides, and the result is not in 
doubt. She lost more men in the single battles of Albuera, 
Alma, and Chillianevallah, than in this entire campaign. 



CHORUS GIRLS, PISTOLS AND CASH. 

ftDDRESSING the Police Commissioners Miss Gertrude 
Hayes, age 16, occupation, chorus lady at the Grand 
Opera House, San Francisco, asks permission to carry a 
concealed weapon. "My business," she says, "frequently 
requires me to be out late at night, often times with large 
sums of money." Ten other letters similar in character 
were sent to the Police Commissioners by young women 
employed in a chorus capacity by Mr. Morosco — all of 'em 
frequently burdened with "large sums of money." 

Now this is a matter for serious consideration. In the 
first place, where do these young women get their large 
sums of money? Mr. Morosco never has been known to 
pay his chorus girls more than their unpadded weight in 
silver. Some of them get as much as nine dollars for a 
week of seven nights and one matinee, and out of this they 
have to find their own rouge, chalk, lampblack and dia- 
monds. Nine dollars are not large sums of money. Even 
if a Morosco chorus girl be frugal and have her street 
gowns lined with nothing more expensive than modest 
cambric, and dine only when she is asked, and walk home 
in cheap shoes and cotton stockings, and hoard her wealth 
week by week — even so, she would have to grow an older 
sixteen than she looks before amassing a fortune that 
would need pistol protection. And the chorus girl who 
supports a husband and a numerous family, and is good to 
her mother besides, what chance does she stand of being 
loaded down with large sums of money. 

Since the year 1856 the News Letter has been the 
friend of the rich and the powerful. Its motto has been: 



"Protect capital at any price and the envious poor will 
shift for themselves." But before taking sides in this 
matter and using any influence that we may have with the 
Police Commissioners, we want to know whether these 
large lumps of midnight wealth on chorus girls are 
phantom or real. If dropped on a long polished slab of 
mahogany would they give out the proper ring? Are 
they the genuine blonde coin of the realm, or just the 
spurious peroxide junk metal that actors hand to each 
other on the stage? In other words are these girls trifling 
with the public and press of a great city, or are they 
actually suffering under a weight of riches that must be 
protected even at the revolver's mouth? If the former be 
the case the News Letter will spare neither time nor ink 
in exposing the scheme; if the latter, we will engage our- 
selves to try to coax S. G. Murphy to open up a Chorus 
Girl's Annex to the National Bankery at the sign of the 
three balls and charge these vestal millionairesses a 
storage rate of not more than ten per centum on term 
deposits. For on second thoughts we do not approve of 
stage ladies carrying pistols in any circumstance — 
that is not without a close season for dramatic critics. 



THE BRITISH SEIZURES. 

IT was from the first unlikely, as this journal pointed 
out, that the British Government really intended to es- 
tablish the precedent for its enemies in future wars that 
foodstuffs are contraband of war. The occasion was a 
tempting one on which to raise the question. But no idea 
could have existed that Great Britain's position would not 
be promptly and lustily challenged. The purpose no 
doubt was to get an authoritative decision on the point 
for England's future use. It is somewhat suggestive that 
the only two powers to protest were the United States and 
Germany: — Great Britain's friends, if she has any. France 
and Russia had nothing to say, and no doubt would have 
been glad to have seen the precedent established. But 
the protests of Germany and the United States, and the 
graceful submission Lord Salisbury has just made to our 
Secretary of State, have settled the question. At first 
the opposition party in England feared that the govern- 
ment meant the seizures seriously. Accordingly we find 
Lord Rosebery writing to the Times an inquiry for official 
information as to what was intended, while the Times it- 
self said that "a very wide-spread feeling existed in Eng- 
land that it would be unwise to create such a precedent." 
Sir Charles Dilke declared that "it would be one of the 
greatest follies the country could commit to disregard the 
possibility of a war some day against a powerful naval 
coalition, in which event it would be to the interests of the 
United States to feed Great Britain. She must endure 
the present conditions." In protesting against seizures 
of American flour Americans have really done England a 
service, and Lord Salisbury hardly disguises his sense of 
obligation at the fact. It required no great prescience to 
foretell that this matter would end as it has. 



LONG DISTANCE SYMPATHIZERS. 

FOR a gathering of Irish and Dutch, and miscellaneous 
politicians to proclaim their views concerning the 
Transvaal in the name of "we the people of San Francisco" 
required a large amount of nerve, but the amount was not 
lacking. The situation in Africa has often been explained, 
so often that no man devoid of prejudice could possibly side 
with the Boers. They have from the beginning been in 
the wrong. For them to triumph now would be the hard- 
est blow that civilization could receive. Not alone is the 
future of England at stake, but the future of the world. 
To express the hope that the Boers, brutal, selfish, narrow 
and bigoted, delighting in ignorance, revelling in filth, 
anxious to clog all progress, may defeat the English, the 
great balance wheel of nations, is to register allegiance 
with degradation, to spurn culture and extol barbaric 
greed. The Irish who talk the loudest are those whose 
life work has been the hating of England from a safe dis- 
tance. The Celt has roared more lustily about his wrongs, 
passed the hat oftener, and done less for practical redress 
than the member of any other race who ever battened on 
the sweet morsel of grievance. The Dutch are not to be 
so much blamed, for to side with those of their own blood 



January 13, 1900. 



BAH] 



la but natural. The demagogues who are Irjrinir ' 
• bero out of Oon> Paul, kowtowing befor. .• and 

comparing him with the incomparable Washington are to 
be censured nv>st of all. Their game is too 
The? cannot be so stupid as they proclaim tl 
The business of citiiens of this country is to be Americans. 
Bad the Boers deported themselves in a seemly and decent 
fashion their rights would have been manifest and recog- 
nized. But in the light of their career they can no more 
maintain monopoly in the Transvaal than the Blarkfoot 
can declare title to the western plain over which he 
chased the buffalo. Only for the coming of the Uitlander, 
the despised and trampled upon alien, the wealth of the 
veldt below the surface would have lain dormant. This 
alien furnished the capital, the brains and the energy to 
give the lands of the earth the gold they needed for the 
sustenance of commercial life. The B >er, by choice a 
slave-holder, has always maligned and oppressed the 
stranger within his gates. The stranger had to pay the 
taxes, but could sav nothing of their expenditure. Laws 
were devised to burden him. He did not have the status 
a Boer granted to a dog. He was practically barred 
from becoming a citizen, but had to foreswear his allegiance 
to the land of his birth, and thus become a man without a 
country. The desire of the Boer was less for the gold 
than to keep anybody else from having it; he was the 
snarling canine in the manger, and he is being forked out 
as he deserved to be. Oom Paul is rather an autocrat 
than a patriot, a king rather than a president. The 
Boers have shown themselves cruel and treacherous. 
They are not entitled to sympathy, and they are not get- 
ting it from any source of intellect. The mouthings of a 
lot of professional malcontents do not express the senti- 
ments of this people. 



LARGE GIFTS TO EDUCATIONAL AND CHARITABLE 
INSTITUTIONS. 

THE Chicago Tribune keeps a record of gifts to educa- 
tional, religious and charitable institutions of which 
public announcement is made, and its figures for the past 
year are phenomenally large. Altogether thev rise to 
$79,749,956. as eomnared with a total for 1898 of '$23,984,- 
900. and of $33,612,814 in 1897, and about the same sum in 
1896. Thus within the comparatively short period of four 
years we have the enormous sum of $170,000,000 volun- 
tarily contributed to beneficent uses. In no other age, nor 
in any other country is such a showing to be found. If 
our people are in haste to get rich, it is apparent that 
many of them are not slow to put their money where it 
will do the most good. The 1899 record includes $28,000,- 
000 turned over by Mrs. Leland Stanford to the University 
at Palo Alto, and $10,000,000 given to the University at 
Berkeley by Mrs. Phoebe Hearst. Thus California, 
through the generosity of two of her most honored women, 
contributed about one half the total sum furnished by the 
entire nation. It is needless to say that our two great 
universities are now rich enough to realize their utmost 
usefulness. The future is largely in their hands. Under 
their guidance, great men and good women, will be trained 
up on these Western shores of America to aid in the 
development of the world, and bless the generous founders 
who have done so much for civilization and progress. 



POLICE MANAGEMENT. 



THE new Police Commission is composed of honest, well 
meaning men, who, however, are all new to the busi- 
ness. It will be the part of good journalism to give them 
the benefit of its experience, and it will be no less the duty 
of the new Commissioners to give heed to wise counsels. 
It will be more-conducive to the public weal to avert mis- 
takes by timely suggestions, than to criticise and condemn 
them after they have been committed. The new commis- 
sion is pledged to give the police department a "thorough 
renovating." That it badly needs such an overhauling 
has been made plain in the columns of this journal for 
years past. We hope that never again may we be called up- 
on to pass through such an experience as we have had 
upon this subject. We purpose to help the present com- 
missioners all we can, by pointing out pitfalls and suggest- 
ing needed reforms. Last week we dealt with the ques- 



tion of gh ril in 

that - <>re must ' that 

»orl of ne« 

•11 alike, and as a matter of right, else w( hav» 

again a police department that the press dare not rri' 
and thai is a law unto itself. Perhaps the next most Im- 
portant difficulty the comn encounter 
is the dealing with Chinatown. There is much money in 
the vices of that wretched corner of our city. Besides 
the large contributions levied upon it weekly, it has always 
been good for a "sack" upon demand. , Years ago it 
raised 130,000 to afTect the decision that made the police 
commission perpetual. Never rgain must "police pro- 
tection" be extended to vice and crime. There must be no 
dead letters on the statute books but all laws must be ex- 
ecuted against all alike. The commissioners are up 
against one of the worst phases of Chinatown crimes 
right now. Four murders have been committed in that 
region within the past two weeks, and the rival Tongs are 
at this moment in battle array. It is a libel upon police 
management to say that this open violation of the law 
cannot be prevented in the heart of a great city. If there 
be any specially reliable policemen they should be detailed 
to Chinatown. One third of the force, if necessary, should 
be taken from peaceable beats and made to run in every 
known highbinder in the city. Give the Chinese to under- 
stand that the days of corruption a^e over, and that 
business is meant, and soon we shall witness a better 
state of affairs. While we cannot approve of acting Chief 
of Police Biggy's wholesale breaking up of houses of pros- 
titution, thereby loosing these women on the streets, we 
do applaud him for the vigorous manner in which he has 
gone after the Chinese. 



THE SPONTANEITY OF THE LAWTON FUND. 

THE readiness with which some $60,000 has been 
raised for the Lawton fund is exceedingly pleasing. 
There has been no carrying around of the hat, no sensa- 
tional appeals on the part of the press, and nothing done 
that anybody need regret. It has not always been thus. 
Not even the home-buying fund for brave Dewey met with 
such a hearty and spontaneous response. There was 
something in the career and death of General Lawton 
that touched the American heart. He was a plain, un- 
pretentious man who bad risen by merit, and who, in 
point of fighting ability, outranked them all in the 
Philippines. When the simple story was told that all he 
had left his widow and children was a little home in Cali- 
fornia heavily mortgaged, all hearts were touched, all 
purses opened; with what result we now know. When 
that mortgage is paid off there will remain not less than 
$50,000 for the benefit of the widow and children, the free 
and unsolicited gift of the American people. Mrs. Lawton 
knows nothing of all this. While it has been going on she 
has been on the high seas with the body of the deceased 
General. She cannot now be many days away from San 
Francisco. We wonder to whose lot it will fall to first 
break the news to the bereaved lady of what the people 
have done for her. Nothing of course can make up for 
the irreparable loss she has suffered, but if she has had 
(as no doubt she has) dark foreboding as to the struggles 
that awaited her, they will be dispelled as soon as she 
hears the news, and to her dark cloud there will at least 
be a silver lining. After the subscriptions close, and the 
mortgage is lifted, the balance will be invested in New 
York is such a way as to yield Mrs. Lawton a comfortable 
annuity. Secretary Root has been interesting himself in 
this part of the plan, and this insures a careful and 
judicious disposal of the money. Among the pleasant 
features of the fund was the subscriptions of two one 
thousand dollar bills sent anonymously. No intimation of 
the names of the senders was given, and the Committee 
has no idea who they, are. On the other hand, one sub- 
scriber sent a one dollar bill, inclosed a written receipt 
asking that it be filled out and returned to him, and then 
had his letter registered and sent by special delivery. 
Congress will no doubt pass a pension bill of $50 a month, 
so that Mrs. Lawton will be creditably provided for. All 
of which is just as it should be. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 13, 1900. 



NEW MOVES IN SOUTH AFRICA. 

THE tide of British reverses in South Africa seems to 
have turned. General French's victory at Colesburg 
last week is now supplemented by General White's suc- 
cessful assault from Ladysmith upon the Boer's position. 
Naturally enough these two successes have had a bene- 
ficial effect upon the English public mind, and have done 
much to repress disaffection among the Dutch in Cape 
Colony. But much, very much more has yet to be ac- 
complished before the British army can be said to be safe. 
Hemmed in as it is, it is in imminent danger. If General 
Buller, with the odds so greatly against him on the Tugela, 
should succeed in breaking through the Boer line, the 
whole situation would of course be changed. He seems 
bent upon offering a desperate battle, with the chances 
all against him. A week ago it seemed as if there was 
nothing else left for him to do unless he left Ladysmith to 
its fate, which no British officer of bis rank would think 
of doing. It may be, however, now that General White 
has shown that he can take care of himself, General 
Buller may not risk a doubtful battle. The method by 
which General French attacked the Boers and saved 
Colesburg shows that the British have at last seen light, 
and that the cavalry service and the scouting, in which 
they have been so wofully deficient heretofore, may be 
soon raised to something like the efficiency necessary 
to fight the mobile Boers. General French won the Coles- 
burg fight by flanking and surprising the enemy. Buller 
and Methuen were defeated by walking doggedly up to 
the enemy's front and taking a merciless fire from posi- 
tions so well fortified as to be practically impregnable. 
There has been but one other flank fight in the war. 
That was at Elandslaagte, where General French was 
again in command of the British, and it won. There has 
been much outcry, both in England and in this country, 
because the British commanders have not made more 
effort to get behind their opponents. The explanation is 
that they have been short of mule trains to take their 
army away from railroad trains. But the condition in 
that respect is being improved every day. In the open 
veldt, or prairie, the Boers could not successfully contend 
against a solid phalanx of British infantry, but the case is 
very different when the Boers are safeguarded behind 
rocks and trenches that no infantry can get at. Sooner 
or later the British forces will work their way out of the 
fringe of mountains that now encircles them on the bor- 
ders of Natal, and that will be the beginning of the end. 

PILOTAGE AND HARBOR DUES. 

THE monopoly and high charges of the pilots at this 
port have long been a scandal. At several succes- 
sive sessions of the Legislature bills were introduced to 
cure this evil, but out of their enormous earnings the 
pilots were always able to send a "sack" and a lobby to 
Sacramento to defeat legislation. Time and again scan- 
dals arose out of their proceedings. More than once cor- 
rupt money was traced pretty close home to certain mem- 
bers, but nothing came of it all, except talk. Now it ap- 
pears that Congress is about to take hold of the subject 
matter. Among the bills introduced this session is one to 
do away with the present system of compulsory tilotage 
under State authority. The measure proposes that mas- 
ters of vessels, on entering or leaving ports of the United 
States, are to be allowed to navigate their ships unaided 
by a pilot, and any master mariner who can pass the re- 
quired examination before the local inspectors of the 
United States Steamboat Service will be authorized to act 
as pilots for any vessel arriving at or departing from this 
country. In other words, there will be free trade in the 
business. Any steamship line, or combination of ship 
owners, will be able to keep their own pilot. And any 
duly qualified seaman will be able to sell his services 
to such firm or firms as may care to hire them. 
It is needless to point out that this would at once 
break down monopoly and lessen charges, and, at 
the same time, would probably give a more satisfactory 
service. The regulation of the pilot service of the entire 
country under federal authority would be a great im- 
provement upon the present system, or rather lack of 
system, and it will be well for commerce when such a 
change is brought about. It will be a step forward in the 
matter of making San Francisco a free port. 



THE FINANCES OF OUR NEW COLONIES. 

IT may seem a little early yet to fix rules governing the 
finances of our new colonies, but it is never too soon to 
anticipate difficulties plainly in sight, with a view to being 
prepared to meet them when they arrive. Official steal- 
ing has always been in order in both Cuba and the 
Philippines. The natives, officials, and clericals, are all 
alike accustomed to it. The local environment is all 
against honest administration. It will be very easy to go 
on in the old rut, and very hard to keep governors, 
collectors of revenue, and other officials out of it. Yet 
that is exactly what we must succeed in doing, or our 
management of the new colonies will become a scandal be- 
fore the world. It is worth noting in this connection that 
the economists of the country, as represented at the meet- 
ing of the American Economic Association recently held 
at Ithaca, have had this subject under most careful con- 
sideration. They have arrived at some conclusions de- 
serving of thoughtful attention, certain of which seem self- 
evident, as, for example, that each colony must be con- 
sidered by itself, and that its system must be adapted to 
its own peculiar conditions; that the selection of sources 
of revenue should in each case be determined in accordance 
with the economic and social conditions of the colony, and 
that the finances should always be managed for its develop- 
ment. One of the suggestions will be heartily concurred 
in by all well wishers of this Republic, if it be found to be 
practicable. It is that "for the proper administration of 
the fiscal system in any of the dependencies of the United 
States it is absolutely essential to establish a civil service 
which is beyond question as repects the ability and honesty 
of its personnel." That is more than we have yet been 
able to accomplish in most of our large cities, but that is 
no reason why it should not be attempted in Havana and 
Manila. If General Wood and General Otis can succeed 
in those two unpromising cities, they may yet give laws 
and administration to Chicago and New York. 



FIGHTING THE RECIPROCITY TREATIES. 

THE debate in the French Chamber over the Franco- 
American treaty has come to hand at the right mo- 
ment to do the most good to our wine and fruit growers. 
The French have too plainly shown their hands for their 
own good. They actually boast that they outwitted our 
poor Mr. Kasson and got the better of him. They say 
that the treaty affects only 4 per cent, of American im- 
ports, with a possible gain of $200,000 per annum, while it 
covers 53 per cent, of French products, with a prospective 
benefit of $1,040,000. M. Delcasse, in making his official 
statement in the Chamber, revelled in delight at the 
thought of how he had dished the American negotiator. 
He explained that though Mr. Kasson "made pressing de- 
mands in behalf of American agriculture," he was able 
not only to "resist" them, but actually obtained "useful 
reductions in favor of French agricultural products." 
This bears out what was said in Washington dispatches at 
the time, that the treaty was so one-sided that Mr. Kas- 
son proposed to abandon it altogether, and finally signed 
it only on the direct orders of the President. Republican 
Senators have looked closely into the treaty, and are re- 
ported to be "surprised at what they found." Of course 
our own Senator and Representatives from California are 
certain the treaty will never do, as its main purpose 
seems to have been to ruin the fruit growers and wine 
producers of the Pacific Slope. Western, and especially 
Ohio Representatives are said to be "speechless with in- 
dignation" over the Argentine treatv, with its 20 per 
cent, reduction in duties on wool. Did they make the 
greatest known protectionist President for this? Ohio's 
favorite son is not in favor at home just now. But he will 
get over that. Ohio's vote must not be endangered by a 
mere reciprocity treaty. It will be thrown overboard to 
lighten the ship. 

To Cure A Cold In One Day 
Take Laxative Bromo Quinine Tablets. AH druggists refund the 
money if it fails to cure. E. W. Grove's signature is on each box. 
25 cents. 

No man glories in the fact that he is bald ; take warning in time if 
your scalp itches, it is just a reminder that you will sooner or later 
become bald. Use Smith's Dandruff Pomade, the only positive cure 
for itching scalp. 



January 13, 1900 




The Best Malt Tonic. 



IT h»s loog been an open secret among the fashionables 
that a well known old bachelor of comfortable n 
has had a life long veneration for a prominent family in 
our community, but alas there was no way of getting 
closer than ordinary friendship. Now as luck would have 
it the old gentleman sees a glimmer of hope, for according 
to Dame Rumor he has serious ' hopes of inducing the 
widowed sister of the family he so adores, to remain here 
and share as his wife the quaint home he dwells in. 

* • » 

Among the grown up beaux of our Swim there i> n t 
one who has enjoyed such a reputation for generm.- 
and polite attentions to his lady friends as Mr. K A. 
Wiltsee, whether bon-bons, flowers or theatre parties 
were his mode of expressing his kindness all his ynung 
lady friends shared in them, so it will not surprise tbem in 
hear of his generous gift in aid of the Hospital Ship Ha ne 
which has been such a success owing to the unceasing 
efforts of Lady Randolph Churchill, who sailed on board (if 
her to the seat of war in South Africa. How much more 
this work smacks of humanity and real assistance to the 
sick and suffering than filling a public hall with blatant 
speeches and airing fire eaters' opinions. 

* * # 

Miss Hager's children's dinner was such a success it is 
now rumored that a leader of society is going to give her 
friends an original function wherein Shakespeare's "Seven 
ages of man" is to be illustrated during the first part of 
the evening and then will follow a cotillion in which the 
dancers are to be arrayed in Shakespearean characters. 
Gossip say there was danger of a hitch when the matter 
was first talked over by a few congenial spirits, no one 
wanting to portray "the lean and slippered pantaloon" 
but a young man from Dawson who is noted for his readi- 
ness to do anything and all things — when fashion calls — 
has been found acquiescent. 

» * * 

Of all jolly places for a month's diversion, they say 
Honolulu stands unrivalled, especially as being so remote 
from "head centers" that one may go in for having a good 
time free from fear of talk. This was evidently the frame 
of mind in which two of our young matrons started in to 
enjoy their visit to a friend over there, but in these days 
one is not free from gossip anywhere; not even the Fiji 
Islands can be relied upon as safe from the many toDgued 

Dame. 

* » * 

Neither distance nor climate seems to make much 
difference in the hospitalities of Jeremiah Lynch. In 
Dawson recently he gave a dinner in honor of Mr. and 
Mrs. Alexander McDonald which would have done the 
proudest metropolitan host proud. Lynch will find a way. 
The jovial literatus, gourmet, politician and clubman will 
return to San Francisco early in the fall, bringing with 
him a whole ship's ballast of nuggets. Here's your chance, 

girls; he is still single. 

* * * 

Now that wives can get star engagements on the stage, 
we may expect that they will assert themselves whenever 
hubby says a business engagement will keep him down 
town indefinitely o'nights, and our Theatrical Companies 
will be largely recruited from these emancipated ladies. 

* * * 

What an awful pity it is that that prince of good fellows, 
J. W. Byrne, does not go more generally into society, is a 
remark frequently heard at luncheons and teas, but 
singular to relate the gentleman apparently finds more 
pleasure in Athletic sports than the sort allurements of 

ladies' drawing rooms. 

* * * 

On dit the magnificent silver service presented to a 
mining magnate by a Virginia Company has been io turn 
given by said magnate's only daughter to her cousin's bride, 
the magnificence of the gift being worthy of the donor and 
the fair bride alike. 

Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. Cooper & Co. 
746 Market street. San Francisco. 




BURKE'S 



OUINNESS'S 



STOUT 



Gives Strength and Stamina 



Ask your dealer for Burke's. 



SHERWOOD & SHERWOOD, Importers, 

212-214 Market St., San Francisco. 



College San Rafael 



For Young Ladies 



Conducted by the Sisters of St. Dominio. 
Full collegia course of studies, A boarding school of highest 
grade. Superb modern building. Steam heated. Beautiful mid 
commodious class rooms. Music and art rooms. 

Located in the lovely Magnolia Valley 
Unsurpassed for beauty and heal thfuln ess. Address, 



Mother Superior 

College San Rafael, San It a fuel. Cal. 



FRENCH LIBRARY AND FRENCH CLASSES 

This library is the most important of its kind, containing 20,000 books. 
Among Ihcm are the best ancient and latest authors. Under the auspices 
of the library are French classes for adults only, afternoons and evenings. 
Graduate teachers from France give tuition. Terms for library, Si admission, 
50 cents monthly. Terms for classes— 83 a month. 2 lessons a week, entitling 
pupils to literary membership. Apply—French Library, City of Paris Build- 
ing, 135 Geary street. 

The Solly Walter School of Illustration 

In Pen and Ink. 

26 O'Farrell street 

Wm. Williams & Sons 

(Ltd.) of Aberdeen 

V V 
Scotch Whisky 

Importers: MACONDRAY & CO. 

BROUGHAMS and COUPES (Rubber Tires) 
~j^gn Tomkinson's Livery Stable 

57-59-61 Minna street, between Fivst and 
Second. One block from Palace Hotel. 
Carriages and coupes at Pacific Union Club, 
comer Post and Stockton. Tel. Main J53 
Every vehiole requisite for weddings, par- 
ties, calling, shopping, business, or pleasure 
Special orders for foui-in-hands. 
Tel. Main 153. Established 1862. 

J. Tomklnson, Proprietor 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 13, 1900. 




We obey no wand but Pleasure's.'*— Tom Moore. 



grit and temperament, and talent big enough to be unmis- 
takable. Had none of us in the California Tuesday night 
known that it was her first night on the professional stage, 
her performance would still have been one to applaud in 
many places. 



ftNOTHER new play, that may be taken seriously, 
talked about, written about ! The stale old town of 
San Francisco is indeed looking up. If things keep hap- 
pening this way we will soon become critical and difficult 
and superior again as in the days of yore. To be sure The 
Princess and the Butterfly is not so wildly "popular" as The 
Christian; parsons will not crowd to see it and take texts 
from it for their Sabbath sermons; over-virtuous critics 
will not probe its situations in search of lechery and irre- 
ligion; it is not a violent play in any sense. But it is a 
keen, delicate, comfortable little comedy of modern man- 
ners, exploiting in a new way a comparatively new sub- 
ject — that of middle age and how people of pleasure 
and leisure hate to attain to it. Science, art and 
the fleet spirit of end-of-the-centuryism have conspired to 
quicken and shorten life. We grow middle-aged and bored 
almost before we know it. The love of life and life itself are 
still witb us, we have all the desire to enjoy ourselves as 
in the other days, but the enthusiasm is gone, nothing 
seems the same as it used to seem. We are forty or more 
and we know it, and it hurts. Mr. Pinero is pleased to call 
this a new complaint, but like appendicitis it has been al- 
ways with us, only we didn't have it properly labeled. 

Now at the first jump you wouldn't think that a five- 
act play, an even half of which is devoted to hardly any- 
thing but a discussion of the hopelessness of being forty, 
would be very entertaining; and bless our souls it would not 
be save for the other half — the last two acts and a half, 
to be accurate — which follows the diagnosis with the cure. 
In this "cure" of Dr. Pinero's you get a gentle touch of 
romance and sentiment, carefully guarded by satire: and 
what started out to be to all appearances a mere discus- 
sion of commonplace social malady turns out to be a charm- 
ing comedy. Pinero's remedy is very simple. He mar- 
ries the tired gentleman of forty-five to an untamed young 
creature in her teens; he marries the bored and semi-cyn- 
ical lady of forty to an earnest, passionate, unurban youth 
of twenty-seven; first convincing each of the four that be 
(or she) is not in the least ridiculous, that the real secret 
of happy life is the mating of October and May. I don't 
think that this cure would work in all cases. It has not 
the all-round virtues of, say, a patent medicine. But in 
this instance, at least, it seems to be quite effective. The 
curtain comes down sharply at the right moment, and 
only the morbidly inquisitive will wonder how things will 
be getting on ten years later, when the tempestuous 
young man has cut his wisdom teeth and meteoric maiden 
has reached the zenith of beauty and spirits. 

* * * 

I have never known Pinero to be easier in dialogue than 
he is in The Princess and the Butterfly. There are no epi- 
grams, no high language, no big situations — just a quietly 
clever play for a sensitive audience that has wearied of 
the heroics and the tin-pan glitter of the stage. 

* * H 

Mr. Frawley's production at the California is the best 
that he has given this season. The women players take 
up their work with enthusiasm and grace; their manners 
and mode of speech are credible of the characters in por- 
trayal. The men are not so fortunate as a whole, but Mr. 
Reynolds quite surpasses any previous record of his, and 
Mr. Armory does a convincing bit of work. Mr. Reynolds 
is the gentleman of forty-five, and his acting is sane and 
polished but for those elocutionary mannerisms that seem 
inseparable from the reading of Mr. Reynolds. Mary 
Hampton reduces herself to a human key with admirable 
effect as the lady of forty, and Mary Van Buren and 
Marion Barney are thoroughly delightful as modish women 
of the world. But the surprise of the cast is Mary Scott 
— known in private life as Mrs. Neville Castle — who in her 
very first professional appearance undertakes the difficult 
role of Fay Zuliani, and gets through it with considerable 
success. As would be expected, her knowledge of the 
practical business of acting is as yet limited; but she has 



When an opera singer goes a coocertizing on the road 
with a little company that consists of a pianist who 
"doubles" as an accompanist — or should I say an accom- 
panist who doubles as a pianist? — one other instrumental 
soloist — a 'cello player in this instance — the idea preva- 
lent among the wise bodies is that the opera singer is on 
her last legs, and that vaudeville stares her in the face. 
It is an easy thing to get started on the downward chute 
in this busy, selfish world of music and drama, and once 
you are started the very bottom is apt to be none too 
low. Emma Nevada is a Californian in whom our own 
State and the one whose name she bears take an honest 
pride. She is a refined, legitimate artist, who has made 
the very most of nature's gifts. When she aDpeared at 
the California Theatre Monday night, after an absence of 
fourteen years, in the modest environment already men- 
tioned, it was with genuine delight that we found her art 
uufaded and her voice as pure and true as it was in the 
yester-years. Why Emma Nevada should take this un- 
exciting and inexpensive method of returning to the 
world of song, is perhaps her own business and none of 
ours. That she can do as she has done and still triumph, 
is a conspicuous tribute to ber popularity and worth. 

The voice of Nevada is a delicate, limited instrument, 
but within its limitations it is exquisite. It is the birdie 
voice pure and simple; clear, sweet, sympathetic, and of 
a marvelous flexibility. Nevada knows her powers and 
knows her weaknesses as few other singers do. She 
sings the sort of music best adapted to her instrument — 
dainty trick pieces such as the Bell song from Lakme and 
"The Bird in the Wood," to say nothing of "Listen to the 
Mocking Bird." But even this last mentioned relic of 
amateur days is worth the hearing when Nevada sings it. 
In ballads she shows appreciation and taste. She gives 
the text its proper due, and she sings sympathetically 
without verging on the maudlin. There is nothing pas- 
sionate, nothing sensational in the voice and art of 
Nevada. She pleases without thrilling you; she never 
overdoes; and her top notes in pianissimo are the summit 
of vocal perfection. She is really a remarkable boudoir 
artist. 

The piano soloist and accompanist is young, dull and 
usual; the 'cellist, Mr. Blumenberg, is a virtuoso worth 
going a few miles to hear. His tone is somewhat minia- 
ture and his temperament is not of the burning kind, but 
he is a musician of discrimination and a splendid techn'cian; 
indeed, one of the best 'cellists who ever played here. 

* # # 

Even with a Holland at the head of the cast, The Mys- 
terious Mr. Bugle was not much of a success when first 
presented in San Francisco. Now, with Irene Everett, a 
San Francisco girl, who is handsomer than she acts, in 
the leading female role, and the regular members of the 
Alcazar stock company in the rest of the cast, it cannot 
be said that the piece goes any better. Lucette Ryley is 
a clever little play writer, but Bugle 13 not representa- 
tive of her work. It is good news this, that next week 
will see the Alcazariars in Lady Windermere's Fan. Oscar 
Wilde, the dramatist, has not been heard from in a long 
time, but he is still one of the really eminent dramatists of 
England, and Lady Windermere's Fan, while perhaps not 
his masterpiece, is a play of tremendous cleverness and 
dramatic power. Miss May Blaney, an English actress of 
reputation, recently from Australia, will make her first 
appearance in America at the Alcazar on Monday night. 
# * * 

The Tivoli, having distanced all bidders for The Idol's 
Eyt , will give its patrons the opportunity of witnessing 
this well-known work at popular prices, the production 
next Monday night being the first in America at less than 
one dollar and a half. The Tivoli company should score 
success in The Idol's Eye, with Ferris Hartman, Anna 
Lichter, Tom Greene, Annie Meyers, William Schuster, 
Julie Cotte, Ida Wyatt, Cora Harris and Grace Field in 



January 13. 1900. 



N\\ 1 



the ca»t. The first appearance on theTivoli stave 1 
'•1 gell» and Mis* Krarces Tetnplp Craham will 
prable in'. s 9 De Anpeles is the nil 

the f i i.odian, Je: v is, and is the 1 

tentative of the third generation of !,er family to gi 
the at - Graham was the leading contralto of the 

Carl Riga Opera Company of England and has been 
induced to postpone a tour of Australia in ore! 
•ing the role of the "Chief Priestess" in the comic opera. 
Little Bo-Plep will be played for the last time Sunday 
night. 

• • • 

The Christian leaves the Columbia to-night with a record 
of three weeks of solid success. On Monday night Wag- 
enhals and Kemper will present tb6 Louis James-Charles 
B. Hanford-Kathryn Kidder combit ation in what promises 
to be the most elaborate production of The Winter' 
ever seen in San Francisco. Every bit of furnishing used 
in the play has been especially prepared for this produc- 
tion, and is carried by the management. The company 
numbers thirty-seven people, and includes, amoDg others, 
Harry Langdon, John A. Ellsler, Barry Johnstone, Thos. 
Coffin Cooke, Collin Kemper, Norman Hackett, W. A. 
Lincoln, Harvey Cassidy, Geo. McCulla, J. L. McVicker, 
Miss Helen Singer, Miss Aphie James, Miss Emily Grey 
Bethel, and Mrs. Henry Vandenhoff. 
» » # 

The Princess and the Butterfly is worth seeing twice, or 
oftener, and many play-goers will regret that to-night 
will mark the final performance of Pinero's comedy at the 
California. Tfie Countess Gvcki, an adaptation from the 
German by Augustin Daly, in which we last saw Ada 
Rehan in the leading part, will start a season of eight 
nights, commencing Sunday, with all the prominent Praw- 
iey players in the cast. On the Monday week following 
Mr. Frawley will return to melodrama, using Tlie Heart 
of Maryland. 

* * * 

After an absence of three years, the Elinore Sisters are 
back at the Orpheum in a new Cohan sketch called Dan- 
gerous Mrs. JDelaney. The piece is broadly funny and the 
girls work with their usual vim. The vaudeville tramp, 
whose death was predicted years ago, seems still to be in 
the ring. This time he is a musical specialist, Prank La- 
tona by name, and very entertaining, especially in the 
manipulation of a number of freak instruments. And the 
German dialectrician still lives, too, yodel and all, in the 
person of Charles A. Gardner. The new bill promises an 
unusual number of novelties, , including Nelstone and 
Abbey, Hanson and Nelson, Hodges and Launchmere, 
Mile. Emmy's dogs, and Prank Coffin, who will sing his 
d^but in vaudeville. 

* # # 

The programme for the first symphony concert, to be 
given under the direction of Henry Holmes, at the Grand 
Opera House next Thursday afternoon at 3:15, is as fol- 
lows : 1. Overture, Ruy Bias, Beethoven; 2. Symphony in 
D, Haydn ; 3. Siegfried Idyl, Wagner ; 4. Symphony 
Pathetique, Tschaikowsky. Sixty-six musicians will be in 
the orchestra. 

E. Edward Hanlon, actor and entertainer, will be given 
a benefit on Thursday evening, January 18th, in the Golden 
Gate Hall. A number of well-known amateurs and pro- 
fessionals have volunteered. 



Columbia Theatre. " < ™ t2£2kk-mm. 



A fine assortment of new art goods is being displayed for the holi- 
days in the art rooms of William Morris, 248 Sutter street. These 
include paintings in oils and water colors, pastels, eDgravings, 
etchings and fancy prints. Frames and the materials for making 
them are to be seen in great variety, and in the gallery there is a 
picture show that will appeal to all lovers of art. 

Wheh the morning's work has given you a razor-edged appetite, a 
good place to loseit is the Grand Hotel Cafe, whici is newly reno- 
vated, and whose proprietors, Fay & Foster, make a specialty of 
merchants' luncheon from 11 to 2. 



After the play is over go where the fashionable crush goes, to the 
Cafe Zinkand, where the best beers, wines and suppers are to be had 
with a musical accompaniment by Stark's famous orchestra of 
strings. 

Mothers, be sure and use " Mrs. Winslow's Soothinff Syrup " for your 
children while teething;. 



II III 

THE WINTERS TALE. 

aiiTornia i neatre. RmmuoMbj vbau+utinvm 

Another «r.j t i ootnedf waak. Oommenotng Sunday night) Jan* 

vary Hth. Matin) IWLM ' ">ua\ v tn 

Hm int«* AuffusUn Daly** proUtaul ol a) 

THE COUNTESS GUGKI. 

Mi-- Mttry Van Buran In Ada Rattan's rnoal popular role. 
tn Preparation: Tai Hnni or Marvi.axd. 



Alr-,7-,r TU/*-» +•,-•* Frkd Bklasco. I/wfl. Mark Tram, 

nicazar I neaXre. Manner. Phono, Main 9M, 

Week of January 16th. Matinee (Saturday and Sunday. First 
time tit thli theatre ol Oeoai Wtlda'i beautUul play, 

LADY WINDERMERE'S FAN. 

American debut of the distinguished foods; aotreee, aflai May 
Blayney. 

Alcazar Prloes— 15c., 25o., 35c.. 50c. 

Tit/**l! fir^r* — -. H«..^« Mr*. Ernestine Krelinq. 
IVOll KJOera riOUSe. Proprietor and Manager. 

Last times, to-night and to-morrow [Sunday J, of the extrava- 
ganea, Little Bo-Prsp, 

Monday evening, January 15th, first production at popular prices 

ol Prank Daniel's irrcat comic opera, 

THE IDOL'S EYE 

Every evening and .Saturday matinee. A sumptuous production; 

a superb company, 

Popdlae Prices— 25c. and 50o. Telephone for seats, Bush 9. 



Orph 



eum. 



San Francisco's Greatest Musio Halt. 

O'Farrell St,, between Stockton and Powell streets. 



Hanson & Nelson 
Frank Coffin 



Hodges & Launchuiurc 
Mile. Emmy's Dogs 



NELSTONE Z, ABBEY 



Charles A. Gardner 
Elinore Sisters 



Frank Latona 

John and Nellie Macartney 

Reserved Seats 25c.: balcony 10c,; opera chairs and box seats 50o. 

Matineea Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 



Grand Opera house-Special. 

Thursday afternoons, January 18th, February 1st and 15th, and 
March 1st and 15th, at 3:15 o'clock, 

FIVE SYMPHONY CONCERTS 

Under the direction of Henry Holmes, Orchestra of 66 pieces. 

Subscription price for series: 85, 84, 83, 82, and 81. 

Sale opens at Sherman Clay Co.'s Thursday, Jan. 4th, at 9 a, m., 

and closes Thursday, Jan. 1 1 th, at 5 p. m. 

Seats for single concert, 81.50, 81, 75c, , 50c, and 25c. 

Western Turf Association, & 00 3ES^n ,M 1 K5 

Congress. 

TANFORAN PARK, 

Third Meetinc, d/\N. 1st TO dAN. 20th, 1900 INCLUSIVE 

Six high-class running races every weekday, rain or shine, beginning 
at 1:30 p. m. The ideal winter race track of America. Patrons step directly 
from the railroad carB into a superb grand stand, glass enclosed, where com- 
fortably housed in bad weather they can enjoy an unobstructed view of the 
races. 

Trains leave Third and Townsend streets at 9:00, 10:40, and 11:30 a. m.; and 
12:15, 12:35, 12:50, 1;25 p.m., returning immediately after last race and at 4:45 
p. m. Rear car« reserved for women and their escorts. No smoking. Valen- 
cia Btreet ten minutes later. San Jose and Waj Stations — Arrive at San 
Bruno at 12:45 p. m.; leave San Bruno at 4:00 and 4:45 p. m. Rates— San 
Francisco to Tanforan and return, including admission to track, 81.25. 
W. J. Martin, President. F. H. Green, Secretary and Manager. 

After the Theatre 

Go where the orowd goes — to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to Stark's matchless string band and enjoy the finest 
wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand is society's gathering place after the show is 
. oven. 

Blake, Moffit & TOWne Telephone Ma ln l<>9 

Dealers in PAPER 



Blake, Mofflt & Towne, Los Angeles. 
Blake, MoFall & Co., Portland, Or. 



55-57-59-61 First street, S. F. 



Dr. Charles W. Decker, Dentist 



Phelan Building Rooms 6, 8, 10. 



Entrance 'WO Market street 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 13, 1900. 




Woton, Siegfried Miss Anna Alice Chapin has given much 
and Briinnhiide. time and thought to the study of the 
more or less involved stories of Wagner's 
operas. The very pronounced success of her first book, 
"The Story of the Rhinegold," was duplicated in "Wonder 
Tales from Wagner." A third volume, planned upon much 
the same lines, is "Woton, Siegfried and Briinnhiide," an 
invaluable companion volume to its predecessors. It has 
been claimed that Wagner rarely appeals to the casual 
inquirer who looks only on the surface for attraction. In 
her preface Miss Cbapin says: "In Wagner's music- 
dramas, as in our life-tragedies, there is no flaunting 
revelation of inner meanings for the edification of the 
passer-by. In a wonderful double language these inner 
meanings are expressed, — a language not difficult to 
understand, for it is written for the heart." It is "these 
inner meanings" of the master's "wonderful double 
language" that Miss Chapin endeavors to interpret for 
the music-loving world, and very admirably she succeeds. 
Of the three principal characters of the Nibelungenlied 
the author has made a careful study, giving equal atten- 
tion to the literary and the musical side of Wagner's 
masterpiece. Briinnhiide, goddess and woman, Walkiire 
and wife, Siegfried, a glowing type of glorious failure, 
Wotan, the chief of gods, as presented by Wagner are 
always strangely impressive, but they take on a new in- 
terest after a careful perusal of Miss Chapin's book, which 
elucidates in a striking manner a tragedy, "formed from 
the tangled and broken ends of a dead mythology." 

Woton, Siegfried and Briinnhiide; by Anna Alice Chapin. Harper & 
Brothers, Publishers, New York. Price 81.25. 

The Monster and Mr. Stephen Crane's versatility is well 
Other Stories. shown in the latest volume bearing his 
name, "The Monster and Other Stories." 
The longest of the three stories which go to make up the 
book is "The Monster," a tale weird and grewsome in the 
extreme, but true to life. It deals with the life of a negro 
servant, whose good qualities have won for him a host of 
friends, until, in trying to save the son of his employer 
from a burning house his face is terribly scarred and his 
brain affected. He becomes a monster in appearance, 
women and children cry out in fright when they see him, 
and strong men cannot look upon him unmoved. He is 
shunned by everyone, only the father of the child, whose 
life he saved, and who is a physician, remaining devoted to 
the poor unfortunate. Occasionally the gloom of the 
story is relieved by some humorous situations, but the 
reader is glad to turn to the two other stories, "The Blue 
Hotel" and "His New Mittens," which are less disagree- 
able at least, if lacking somewhat in strength. 

The Monster and Other Stories: by Stephen Crane. Harper & Brothers, 
Publishers, New York, Price, 81 25. 

Doce Cuentos Something new in the way of a Spanish 
Esoogidos. Reader is a little book by Mr. Fontaine, 
Director of Spanish and French Instruc- 
tion in the High Schools of Washington, D. C, entitled 
"Doce Cuentos Escogidos." It is a collection of selections 
in easy text, from standard writers, such as: Juan 
Valera, Maria del Pilar Sinues, Emilia Pardo Baz&n, 
Jose de Roure, etc. It is edited for class use, with notes 
and vocabulary, and is intended for beginners. It will be 
found useful to both teachers and pupils. 

Doce Cuentos Escoejdos: by C. Fontaine, B. L., L. D. "William R. Jenkins, 
Publisher, New York. Price 50 cents. 

The Land of the The many young readers who followed 
Long Night. with interest Mr. Paul du Chaillu through 
the great Equatorial Forest of Africa, 
will read with pleasure the author's record of a journey 
to the desolate shores of the Arctic Ocean. "The Land of 
the Long Night" is the title of the book, which will charm 
those who love to follow in thought the nomadic Lap- 
lander and his reindeer, hunt wolves, bears, and different 
kinds of foxes and other animals. A land of snow and 
wind and intense cold, a land where during part of the year 
the sun is not seen, for it does not rise above the horizon 



during which time the moon, stars and the aurora borealis 
take its place, is a land well worth writing about. Mr. 
du Chaillu's story makes most interesting reading not 
only for the young folks to whom he lovingly inscribes the 
book, but for many older readers who confess to an abid- 
ing interest in everything that comes from the pen of this 
traveller in and explorer of many countries. 

The Land of the Long Nieht: by Paul du Chaillu. Charles Scribner's 
Sons, Publishers, New York. Price 82.00. 

The appearance of the 150th thousand of that fine his- 
torical romance, "When Knighthood was in Flower," was 
celebrated by the publishers by the issuance of a new edi- 
tion, printed from new plates on a new and heavier paper. 
To this edition is added a portrait and biographical sketch 
of the author, and a portrait of Julia Marlowe, for whom 
the book is being dramatized. Both the author and the 
publishers have cause to be most proud of the book's con- 
tinued success. During every month of 1899 the book 
ranked among the six best selling books, and in each 
month the sale increased. At this time the orders are 
largely in excess of one thousand copies a day. 

"Peg Woffington," by Charles Reade, although written 
in the early fifties, still maintains a strong hold on the 
affections of the reading public. It is perhaps one of his 
best novels, and the picture of the old actors whom he sets 
about Margaret Woffington, Clive, Quin, Cibber and 
Garrick, probably fairly accurate copies of the originals, 
are interesting additions to the history of early theatrical 
life in London. The present edition, a very satisfactory 
one, contains an introduction by Austin Dobson and a 
wealth of illustrations by Hugh Thomson. Doubleday & 
McClure Co., Publishers, New York. Price $2.00. 

" Rules of Golf," as approved by the Royal and Ancient 
Golf Club of St. Andrews, by J. Norman Lockyer, C. 3., 
F. R. S., and W. Rutherford, is a little book of convenient 
pocket size, which will be found of incalculable value to 
lovers of this very fashionable game. It contains also 
special rules for stroke competitions, and a chapter on 
the Etiquette of Golf. The Macmillan Co., Publishers, 
New York. Price, 50 cents. 

"Nathaniel Hawthorne," by Annie Fields, is the latest 
addition to "The Beacon Biographies," edited by M. A. 
DeWolfe Howe. The aim of this series is to furnish brief, 
readable and authentic accounts of the lives of those 
Americans whose personalities have impressed themselves 
most deeply on the character and history of their country. 
Each volume has a frontispiece portrait, a calendar of im- 
portant dates, and a brief bibliography for further reading. 
Small, Maynard & Co., Publishers, New York. Price, 75c. 

"A Pretty Tory" is Mrs. Jeanie Gould Lincoln's latest 
book. Its sub- title, "A Romance of Partisan Warfare 
During the War of Independence in the Provinces of Geor- 
gia and South Carolina, Relating to Mistress Geraldine 
Moncriffe," gives a good idea of its contents. Mrs. Gould 
is well-known as an interesting writer for young people, 
a former story, "Marjorie's Quest," having made for her 
many juvenile friends. Houghton, Miflin &Co., Publishers, 
Boston. Price, $1.50. 

" Feats on the Fjird," by Harriet Martineau, has been 
added to the "Temple Classics for Young People" series. 
The book has twelve illustrations by A. Rackham. J. M. 
Dent & Co., Publishers, London. 

BOOKS EECEIVED. 

Cassell & Co.: "Milton's Earlier Poems," National Library 
Series, price 10 cents. "King Lear" National Library Series, price 
10 cents. 

Whitaker & Ray Co.: "Some Homely Little Songs," by A. J. 
Waterhoase. "Forget-Me-Nots," by Lillian Leslie Page. 

J. F. Fenno & Co.: "Mistress Penwick," by Dutton Payne, 
price $1.50. 

The Macmillan Co.: "Valda Hanan," by Daisy Hugh Pryce, 
price $1.60. 

Olof A. Toflteen: "Myths and Bible," by the publisher, price 
60 cents. 

Band, McNally & Co.: "Mexican Vistas," by Harriott Wight 
Sherratt. 

M. E. B. 



January 13, 1900. 



SW I 




' It<-«r lb* Crttr I" " Wh»l Ihr Hcvll >rt thnu I " 
' On* that will plw the devil, dr. wllh Ton." 



"0" 



Papa, take me in your anus, 
Restrain me lest I bawl ; 
For I bare beard an awful n 
e oul from Cltj Hall. 

"Antl oaths ami chairs and writing desks 
And bullets fill the air— 
<>h. tell me. tell me. Papa dear. 
What are they doing there?" 
" Pray calm yourself, my timid dear." 

Said Papa, good and kind. 
" If you had lived in "Friaoo long 

Such things you would not mind. 
" When come such sound from City Hall 
Attribute thus thecause: 
It is the big machine at work 
A-making of the laws." 

THE Anglo-Boer war, like the Spanish-American war 
and the Philippine emeute, is beginning to be pro- 
ductive of some of the rawest fakes that were ever put 
forth in the name of news. An illustration of this is to be 
found in the substance of a telegtam, purporting to be an 
extract from a letter from a James P. Dunn, who is said 
to be serving with the Irish Brigade in the Boer service. 
The letter says that: "The cheer that went up couid be 
heard a mile off, and we went over the entrenchments at 
them with the bayonet. The redcoats would not stand 
for it, but went down the hill in a break." Evidently Mr. 
Dunn has participated in the South African difficulty 
from a long distance. The Boers have been able to check 
the British advance by being able to avoid close fighting 
through their accurate firing at long range. Tbe bayonet 
is the favorite British weapon. The Boers, if we mistake 
not, do not carry bayonets. Wherever the British have 
got close enough to them to use the bayonet they have 
carried the point. But tbe worst break Mr. Dunn makes 
is in the statement that "the redcoats would not stand 
for it." In Ireland British soldiers wear redcoats; in 
South Africa their uniform is made of kahki, like that 
which our own soldiers wear in the Philippines. At the 
long distance from which Mr. Dunn apparently viewed 
the encounter which be describes, he is evidently color 
blind. 

IN the city of London, England, a womaa is about to be 
hung for murder. In San Francisco a great number 
of our "leading" citizens would be invited to attend such a 
very interesting function, which would take place at 
"high noon." But in London they do things differently, 
and so the repulsive performance will take place in the 
early morning and in the presence only of the few officials 
who are compelled by the law to be there. But then 
when one comes to think of it there is an even more marked 
difference between the habits of the two places in respect 
to these functions. In San Francisco we do not hang 
ladies for committing murder. We make heroines out of 
them. 

THE Salvation Army, at its Market-street stronghold, 
has the words, "Salvation Army Div'l Headquarters," 
displayed in large letters across its front. About this 
word "Div'l" we would like to know. Does the red- 
shirted Army of Righteousness keep the Arch Fiend 
caged in that second-story barracks, or is the word 
"Div'l" simply an abbreviation for the perfectly harmless 
adjective "Divisional"? Wot t' ell ? 

GUERIN, the babbling Parisian freak who barricaded 
himself in bis house against the police until smoked 
out by his own effluvium, has been sent to jail for ten years. 
There he will find the sanitary conditions better, but the 
chances of making a spectacular display of idiocy distress- 
ingly worse. 

ftT the test of candidates for the Secretaryship to the 
Civil Service Board, one old gentleman took a copy of 
the Charter with him, and deliberately proceeded to copy 
whole chunks from it. Unfortunately he was caught out, 
and the city lost a splendid politician. 



Miarl*rof a ar» 

thf lawful wif. 
will take her ra»e to tl 
ag hvr own and h< n'a rightful 

shares of tl 

by the court as the legitimate son and daughter of the 
dead capitalist. She will also tell her story about the 
log will, in which Judge Wallace and I. W. Hellman 
were named as executors. Altogether it promises to be 
a warm case, in which public sympathy will be with the 
plaintiff. And the Sutro heirs bv Butro's first wife will let 
it come to court. They, better than any one else, know 
their father's regard for the woman who now asks for a 
fair division of bis estate, and a fair name for his children. 
If they bad not kniwn this to a dead certainty, no quarter 
of a million would have been offerpd in compromise. They 
know that the parentage of Mrs. Kluge-Sutro's two young 
chi dren is as legitimate as their own. But in an attempt 
to hog the greater part of the estate, they will let the 
case come to court; they will endeavor to blacken the 
character of the man whose money they have lived and 
expect to live the rest of their lives on. King Lear's 
progeny were grateful by comparison. Bahl my masters, 
the world is rotten these days. 

THE Crier, himself old in the ways of iniquity, notes 
with a feeling akin to pain the increase in the vice of 
cigarette smoking alike among the callow youth and the 
maidens who have forgotten, through the lapse of time, 
the year of their nativity. Vice and virtue are simply a 
matter of latitude and longitude, and the vice of cigarette 
smoking is in the viciousness of the cigarette itself. There 
is nothing absolutely Satanic in a good pure cigarette made 
of clean paper and clean tobacco, but there is a devilish 
kind of harm in a roll of paper filled with a compound of 
Heaven and the maker only knows what, and flavored 
with opium, belia donna, and other toxics. Fashion has 
decreed that a whiff between courses at dinner is the cor- 
rect thing- -and fashion rules. But fashion should go fur- 
ther, and not implant in its followers the taste for nar- 
cotics by permitting the consumption of so-called Turkish 
or Egyptian cigarettes, the component parts of which are 
secured in Front street, San Francisco, or Mott street, 
New York, and an analysis of which would give a Keeley 
graduate an attack of delirium tremens. 

THERE is need of a curfew bell in this city, which is 
neither worse nor better than any other metropolis, 
except that we have in San Francisco an all-the-year-round 
climate. It is shocking to note on our streets after the 
theatre the number of young girls and youths, whose 
flushed cheeks and sparkling eyes are not acquired by 
drinking Spring Valley Water. It is painful to hear the 
giggle which smacks more of intoxication than of mirth, 
and it would be well for parents to find out the how, when 
and where, and at what French restaurant the child of 
the family had spent the evening. The last cars going out 
at night compel the observer to believe that many of the 
younger generation must be orphans, or else have fools 
for parents; but in any event it is a safe bet that the 
younger set who parade Market street in the evening do 
not give much trouble to the Sunday school teachers over 
their bible lessons. 

)>VEN wild Gotham's wildest say 
It's positively shocking 
To see Blanche Bates upon the stage 
Remove her silken stocking. ■ 

It might be well if gentle Blanche 

Appear before those men, 
And just to show her good intent, 

Put on her hose again. 

WILL somebody have the goodness to tell me who 
edited the Blue Book of local society for the year 
1900. Was it Dr. O'Donnell, or Dr. Sanden or the Cor- 
oner? If none of these, why are its pages crowded with 
the names of those long or recently dead? What business 
have the dead with town addresses and days at home? I 
appeal to the Health Officer and the Inspector of Dis- 
interrments. 

IF Senator Clark can prove that he got into the Senate 
without paying his way, he will be privileged to set up 
as a saint, and donning a nice halo, give his colleagues 
the holy ha-ha. 



E 1 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 13, 1900. 






I'd be resigned, if fate decreed, 

ADd I was down in luck, 
To work along the water front 

And push a loaded truck. 

I'd take in washing, peddle books, 

Or even shovel coal ; 
Or be a sailor, and upon 

The ocean's waters roll. 

I would consent to be a king, 

A bootblack or a preacher — 
But, as I live, I would not be 

A San Francisco teacher ! 
» » » 

For the last six months Frank Coffin has been saying a 
fond farewell to his several thousand friends in San Fran- 
cisco and the suburban villages. He has been given a 
"farewell" benefit, "farewell'' dinners, "farewell" pink 
teas, "farewell" presents (everything from a corkscrew 
to a pronouncing dictionary of French), "farewell" hand- 
shakes, warm and cold bottles, and for all I know, fare- 
well hugs, kisses and tears. 

But as yet be never has been able to tear himself to a 
greater distance than San Jose. Like the rich, Frank 
Coffin is ever with us. New York implores him with ach- 
ing arms; London and Paris wait and wait, and sigh dis- 
consolately; but the tenor lingers, and will not wander 
from his own fireside. If bis health holds out I am con- 
vinced that the latter part of the coming century will find 
Frank Coffin the eldest resident of the City by the Golden 
Gate. Parting is the sweetest sorrow in the world to him 
— be will continue it indefinitely. Each new week will find 
him pa' king his trunks and breaking our hearts with an- 
other last good bye. 

His next final farewell commences to-morrow at the 
Orpheum. The timely management of that popular 
theatre have induced him to partake of a short season in 
vaudeville. In opera Frank Coffin was not a wonder, be- 
cause he couldn't and wouldn't act. But be can sing the 
pale moon out of the sky, and there is no reason why he 
shouldn't pile up a success in a ballad turn. I hear that 
"Bid Me Good-bye" will be one of the songs, with "I Can- 
not Bear to Leave Thee" in readiness for the encore. 
» * » 

Since Judge Ogden decided that a man may legally take 
on a "package" without telling his wife where he gathered 
it or with whom he spent the merry hours of night in 
raising the tide, he has been leading a sort of rag time 
existence. The other night he was invited to attend a 
meeting of the Ladies of the Eastern Star fraternity. 
When he entered the hall he was informed that he would 
have to explain his decision to the satisfaction of those 
present. As soon as the lodge dope was cooked he as- 
cended the platform to defend himself. And then there 
were all sorts of trouble. The women mobbed him and he 
was told that the attempt to hold him up was the work of 
outraged housewives and not the doings of daring foot- 
pads. Then he was made to foreswear belief in the deci- 
sion so far as it affected his own household. When the 
ladies got through with him he looked like thirty cents in 

a fog. 

* * # 

The announcement that the engagement of Miss Bernice 
Landers, daughter of the San Leandro capitalist, and 
Alexander Mcintosh has been sundered has created a 
sensation among the smart set on both sides of the bay. 
The reason given for the split-up is that both have dis- 
covered that a marriage between them would lead to 
nothing but unhappiness. Of course that is the mild way 
of putting it. But among the select few of the Hawaiian 
colony that has been cutting so much ice in Oakland 
society the reason for the parting has been the subject of 
all sorts of gossip. 

Mr. Mcintosh, or "the overcoat man," as his frieDds 
delight to term him, is the son of one of the Episcopalian 



missionaries who have waxed fat financially while they 
taught the simple natives the delights of Christianity and 
degeneracy. Young Mcintosh is credited with having 
taught the natives even more. And it was because of his 
psrsistency in initiating the natives into the physical joys of 
the white man's burden that his intended gave him the 
drift. At least that is what the Hawaiian galaxy pipe. 
Being the son of a good and holy missionary Alexander 
Mcintosh is a bit of a blood. He has been listed with the 
tribe who reveled in the delights of the hula-hula and 
is said to be a promoter uf what is popularly dubbed the 
national sport of the islands. And it is the knowledge of 
his powerful weakness, so the murmur's mum, that has 
left him alone in his glory. Of course everyone is shocked 
over the stories that are now whispered about Alexander 
who a few months ago was painted a very paragon of 
virtue and a disciple of that white life about which the 
pagan ascetics used to love to write about. But it has 
come to pass that the passionate sun that beats down on 
Hawaii tanned his gilded soul and left him high and dry on 
the beach of the island delights. 

# * * 

Somebody ought to give John A. Stanton, the painter, a 
badge. He is, as everybody ought to know, a recently 
appointed Park Commissioner, but he seems to have con- 
siderable unsuccess convincing people of the fact. 

The other afternoon, while making his maiden inspection 
of Clay street Park, he came upon a man engaged in cut- 
ting down a large, handsome tree. 

"Hie there I What are you doing?" shouted Stanton. 

"A cuttin'down a tree;" came the drawling response. 

"What right have you got to destroy the city's prop- 
erty ?" 

"Well, you see, I'm gardener here, and I've got a touch 
of inflammatory rheumatism, and the danged tree throws 
too much shade over thit little cabin there where I rest 
afternoons. Rheumatism needs the sun." 

The gardener gave his ax another leisurely swing. 

Red with wrath, Stantou said: "What do you think would 
happen if a Park Commissioner should come along and 
catch you at this?" 

"Oh, I dunno." 

"You don't eh? Well, I'm a Park Commissioner." 

"The hell you are." 

"That's what I am, and you drop that ax right away. 
My name is John Stanton." 

"Never heard of such a person. But see here, young 
fellow, you're interfering with my work. Go way and 
talk to the Stevenson fountain; if you don't I'll chop a chop 
or two out of you." 

The gardener spat thoughtfully on his hands and took a 
new hold on the ax. Stanton concluded he needed a little 
sun himself, also some exercise. He went away imme- 
diately to attena to the matter. 

Really, somebody ought to give him a badge. What's 
the use of being a Park Commissioner if nobody will be- 
lieve you? 

* * * 

Long years ago when I was young, 

I longed for fame; 
And hoped among Les Immortelles 

To see my name. 

Bat now I'm old, I'm satisfied 

If I may see 
My name set up in type in the 

Directory. 

. * * * 

There is a certain prominent barrister in this town — we 
will call him Leigh here — who, despite the fact that he has 
thoroughly mastered the idiosyncracies, idioms, and idio- 
cies of law and equity, has yet never sufficiently acquainted 
himself with the subtleties of mathematics to multiply 
7x9 and get the same result three times in succession. 
Kind fate, however, has provided Mr. Leigh's bosom with 
a wife, for whom to multiply, subtract and add is as to 
eat or to talk fashions; and it is to this gentle helpmeet 
that the worthy consul flies for assistance in his moments 
of arithmetical perplexity. 

The other day the defending attorney in an important 
mining suit came to Mr. Leigh's office to ask if the latter, 
as attorney for the plaintiffs, would not be willing to effect 



January 13. 1900. 



s\\ n;\ 



11 



•otnp ■ ompromise in the case. A discussion arose, and 
:a se«m.-<l tending pretty well toward an amicable 
settlement, when the gentleman for the defense inquired 
what amount of compromise money the plaintiff would be 
willing to accept. 

Mr. Loljjb produced some memoranda and began figur- 
ing nervously on a piece of blank paper. He canceled and 
he multiplied, added and subtracted; but the longer the 
column grew, the more perplexed waxed the worthy 
barrister 9 countenance. At last he tore the paper into 
shreds, and bounding to the telephone rang for his home 
number. Here is Mr. Leigh's half of the dialogue that 
ensued : 

"Hello!— that vou, Geraldine?— yes— say, how much is 
three times nine?- twenty-seven?— thought sol— and six 
times eight?— oh, forty-eight, is it? — thought it was 
thirty-six— thanks, dear, good-bye— no, honey, I'll not be 
home to lunch ! " 

The man of law reseated himself at the table, and began 
to figure anew. After a few silent moments of computa- 
tion he turned with a gratified sigh and said: 

" I am authorized to say, Mr. Jones, that my clients 
will be willing to compromise for $25.500"— then added, 
sotto voce, " It was that six times eight business that 
fooled me I " 



The late office-holder 

Seems many year9 older, 
For sad thoughts are causing him pain; 

Hia soft snap is over. 

He's driven from clover 
And now must seek office again. 
* * * 

The Merchant of Venice was produced in Vienna recently, 
and so impressed Herr Konig, the editor of the Wiener 
Bezirksbote, a Jewbaiting sheet, that in his next issue he 
advised his readers to see the play that they might inform 
themselves how their great countryman, Gnllparzer, had 
pictured the Jew. A Vienna wag thereupon sent editor 
Konig the following note: 

"Dear Mr. Editor— Will you kindly state in the next number of 
your valued paper that The Merchant of Venice was written, not by 
Grillparzar, but by me. A wretched Liberal like Grillparzar could 
never have produced a piece of such evident anti-Semitic tendencies. 
Thanking you in advance for your correction. 

Yours, etc., William Shakespeare. 

Vienna, November, 1899. 

Herr Konig received the letter signed William Shakes- 
peare, 1899, in all seriousness, and in the next issue of his 
paper said editorially: "It was an error on our panto 
attribute The Merchant of Venice to Grillparzar, but we 
trust that Mr. Shakespeare, the actual author, will be 
satisfied with the above acknowledgment." 

California has the distinction of having an editor who 
ranks well with Herr Konig. Some years ago there was 
a Realf revival in San Francisco. The long-neglected 
grave of the "sweetest singer that California ever knew " 
was visited by hundreds, and among the literati a move- 
ment was started to erect a monument in his memory. 
At the height of the revival the publisher of The San Jose 
Letter issued a small volume of the poet's best work. It 
was warmly welcomed by the press of the coast, and its 
kindly reception moved the editor of the Gilroy Advocate 
to the belief that it would be quite the proper thing to 
shower a little admiration upon the author, so he said 
editorially: 

"The poems of Richard Realf have been published by 
The San Jose Letter, to which paper Mr. Realf is a regu- 
lar contributor. Mr. Realf is evidently a young man, but 
if he continue along the lines which he is following, it is 
evident that some day he will have become the Wordsworth 
of the Pacific Coast." 



For a good luncheon, dinner, or breakfast go to the Maison Eicho, 
at the corner of Grant avenue and Geary street, where the chei's, 
waiter", wines, and napery are the finest to be had. Real French 
cooking at the Eiche. 

Liquid Cosmetics being: considered so much more suitable to any com 
plexion, the beneficial effects upon the skin, together with its absolute free 
dom from any poisonous ingredients, make Creme de Lis the one perfect 
liquid cosmetic. 

Maison Tortoni, French Rotisserie, 111 O'Farrell street. Private dining 
rooms; banquet hall. S. Constautini, Proprietor. 



Ihr 






Osteopathic Institute 

Dr. > in 1 1 , Haney, \ T Moore 

t hronn Dbeara and DeformfUoa SUCCI SSR 11 > b 

2<W Sutter V . San Fnncllco. Ph»n». Main 100. 

AUTOMOBILES to the FRONT! 



The Sparks Machine 
the Best. : : 

The lightest, slnmrari cheapest and raoet durable. It climbs tho «itcope* 
crudes and i-» practicable on all kind* of roads. 

It is what everybody wants. 

There is an active demand for the company's stock. 

There Is more money to be made In Automobiles than In Oil or Mining. 

A limited amount of stock is offered at One Dollar per Bhnrc. Par value tlO 
Full information at the oOlce of the 

Sparks Automobile Company 

325 Parrott Building. San Francisco, Cal. S. GUODENOUGH, Secretary. 

EQUITABLE Q/L COMPANY 

This Company owns United States patent to 
160 acres of land, located in the very center of 
the oil belt of the ::::::::;:: 

KERN COUNTY DISTRICT 

And surrounded by flowing wells. This dis- 
trict bids fair to become the richest oil region 
in the world ::::::::;:::: 

Stock Listed on California Oil Exchange. 

. , j- ci 5000 SHARES TREASURY STOCK 

INOW rOr bale f° r Development Purposes at 3. 

H ONE DOLLAR PER SHARE 

No further stock will be offered except at a 
large advance in price :::::;::: 

OFFICE--405 Montgomery St., Room 5, S. F. 



CITY STREET IMPROVEMENT CO. 

Proprletora Fifth floor. Mills Buildimr, San Franoisoo 

Ritlim^n Minf**; Santa Cruz and King City, 
DUUIIIL/M I IIMCS, Monterey county, Cal. 

Contractors for all kinds of street work, bridges and railway construction, 
wharves, jetties and seawalls. 

La Grande Laundry Telephone Bush 12 

Principal office, 23 Powell street, opposite Baldwin Hotel. 
Branch— 11 Taylor Htreet, near Golden Gate avenue 
Laundry— Twelfth street, between Folsom and Howard 
streets. San Francisco. 

FINE IMPORTED 

$30 - Scotch Tweeds == $40 

AUn a large line of Higu-Grade Serges, Worsteds. 
Ve.Ht.ingf*, Golf Knickerbuckers, and Ho.se : : : : 

Snf^fial ** ave J' ust received from London shipment of novelties in 
OJJC-^ICII ladies' Costume Cloths. Inspection Invited. 

CRAIQ BROTHERS, Importing Tailors 

120 Sutter Street.'bet, Kearny and Montgomery streets. Take elevator. 



12 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



January 13, 1900. 




The attention of oil men throughout the 
First-Oass State is concentrated at present.upon the 
Oil Properties, development of the property of the Cali- 
fornia Standard Oil Company and the 
Giant Oil Company in the McKittrick district. These 
companies own some 1,300 acres in the very heart of this dis- 
trict, aDd their flrst producing well is now yielding 250 bar- 
rels per day, with a record of over that under increased 
pumping pressure without any apparent diminishment of 
the supply. With six new wells now well down toward 
the oil sand, and others being drilled, it is difficult to 
make any estimate of the ultimate yield of these magnifi- 
cent properties. As it stands to-day, they are iD a posi- 
tion to pay seven per cent, per annum upon an invest- 
ment of $500,000 from the yield of one well alone. The 
vast extent of territory which is literally seeping with oil 
on the surface, will permit sinking an unlimited number of 
wells, with the prospect for an annual income of enormous 
proportions in the near future. Both of these properties 
are controlled and managed by W. J. Dingee of Oakland, 
who has been a phenomenal success in the past as the 
manipulator of affairs on a large scale, and his good judg- 
ment in selecting this locality for operating in the oil field 
has already been proven correct. The Standard and 
Giant Companies are fully equipped with all the neces- 
sary machinery, with drilling rigs of their own, oil and 
water pipes, settling and storage tanks. At present 
stock in these two concerns is offered at $1 per share, a 
surprisingly cheap price when the immediate condition 
and future prospects for the property are taken into con- 
sideration. 
Active Work in While things are rather quiet in the specu- 
the Oil Fields, lalive market for oil shares, the greatest 
activity prevails in the Geld, where de- 
velopment work is being prosecuted with great success in 
all the principal districts in Central California. Work is 
going on all the time, no matter how much cold water 
people of bearish inclinations may try to throw upon the 
situation. Everything so far tends to confirm the state- 
ment made in these columns that oil production is destined 
to be one of the leading industries of California in the 
future. The yield is increasing daily, and within the en- 
suing year the State will prove quite an important factor 
among the oil producers of the old and new world. Many 
more wells are being drilled in Coalinga, and the same can 
be said of the Kreyenhagen, McKittrick and Panoche 
fields. The blackmailing element, which has interfered to 
some extent with work in certain districts, has recently 
received several setbacks which have checked Iheir opera- 
tions, and a disposition is now apparent to handle con- 
spirators of the kind without gloves. A ride on a rail 
would have a most salutary effect in some cases, with more 
or less justification for remedies which act swifter than 
the law, as it is often administered under existing condi- 
tions. Mining men would not have stood one half the out- 
rages perpetrated in the oil districts without an organ- 
ized effort to protect themselves. The sooner the game of 
claim jumping is stopped the better for all interested in 
the development of the oil industry. 

The Panoche District, in San Benito 
A Choice bit of county, where a high-grade oil of a par- 
Oli Land affine base is encountered, is attract- 
ing the attention of investors in oil, 
who recognize that the quality of the output is des- 
tined to prove quite an important factor in determining the 
future value of a property. The knowledge has undoubt- 
edly led to the rapidly increasing demand for lands in this 
vicinity and the sharp rise in values. The Union Oil Com- 
pany, a pioneer in this particular fie.d, has already four 
good wells, which have been capped, and drilling on the 
fifth is now goiDg on. A neighboring property is owned by 
the Ingomar Petroleum Co., which is actively preparing 
for the vigorous exploitation of a highly valuable tract of 
oil-bearing land, enthused by a successful strike within a 
hundred feet of its boundary lines. This company has the 
backing of a number of well-known apitalists, who have 



every confidence in the future of the valuable lands which 
they have been so fortunate in securing. 

Quite a number of old-time mining men, 

Mining Men who have been abroad for years past, 

Gathering Here, are gradually working their way out 

Westward, renewing acquaintance with 
the leading mineral producing districts as they cross the 
line of travel. The war in South Africa has dulled the 
field of operations in that quarter temporarily, and until 
it ends business in the European mining centers will be 
quiet. Among others en route is John Hays Hammond, 
who will likely spend some time in Southern California for 
the benefit of his health, which has not been of the best 
for some time past. It is more than likely now that he 
will visit San Francisco, where many will be glad to see 
him again. 

Sierra Mines Private information from Forest City, 

are Bonded. Sierra County, reports that the mining 
ground, containing the lower part of the 
Ruby channel, 6,000 feet in length, undeveloped on the 
Bald Mountain Extension and South Fork claims, has been 
bonded to Walter Lawry, for years superintendent of the 
Extension, who has struck gravel averaging $3 a carload. 
The upper tunnel will be cleaned out, au incline made to 
bedrock, and drainage effected by pumping. The Maple 
Grove Mine adjoining the South Fork, with 2000 feet of 
this channel, has been tunneled for nearly 400 feet, and 
yield of gold is similar to that of the Ruby at the lowest 
known part of this already proved auriferous deep ancient 
river bed. 

News has leaked out here during the 

A New Bonanza week of important developments in the 
Looming Up. Angels mine, north of the Utica, in Cal- 
averas county. This property has been 
opening up wonderfully of late, and it is safe to say, judg- 
ing from present appearances, that it will not remain in 
the background any longer, but take its place in the front 
rank of the producing mines of California. A contract is 
now about being placed for a large milling plant, which 
will be erected without any loss of time. Everything 
about it will be of the latest improved pattern. 

Mr. T. J. Clavering, the well-known 

Prosperous Mines of mining engineer, who has just re 



Amador County. 



turned from a visit to mines in the 



vicinity of Sutter Creek, Amador 
county, speaks in very flattering terms of the prospects 
for the leading properties of that district. Work is be- 
ing pushed vigorously and with excellent results, in the 
Gwin, Lincoln and Oneida mines. The Bunker Hill mine 
is being opened again under a strong and capable man- 
agement. Some very high grade ore is still being ex- 
tracted from the Central Eureka mine. 

John J. Valentine, of Wells Fargo & 
Weils Fargo & Co. Company, has just issued the custom- 
Annual statement, ary annual report of precious metals 
produced in the States and Territories 
west of the Missouri river, including British Columbia and 
the Yukon Territory during 1899, which shows in the ag- 
gregate: Gold, 190,190,167; silver, $38,804,498; copper, 
$59,244,994; lead, 15,302,248. Total gross result, $203,- 
541,907. The commercial value at which the several met- 
als named herein have been estimated is: silver, 60 cents 
per ounce; copper, 16 cents per pound, and lead, $4.26 
per cwt. The statement is, as usual, replete with details 
in regard to the output of the different States and Terri- 
tories, with other information of use to the financier and 
mining man. It will be found in another portion of this 
issue. 

The following banking elections were held 
Annual Bank during the week: San Francisco Bank — Di- 
Eiections. rectors: James K. Wilson, D. J. Staples, 
William Pierce Johnson, George A. Pope, 
H. E. Huntington, John Barton and C. S. Benedict. The 
board subsequently organized by the election of the old 
officers, as follows: James K. Wilson, President; William 
Johnson, Vice-President; L. I. Cowgill, cashier, and F. 
W. Wolfe, assistant cashier. Nevada Bank — John W. 
Mackay, James L. Flood, Louis Gerstle, Isaias W. Hell- 
man, Henry F. Allen, C. De Guigne, Robert Watt, Levi 
Strauss, D. N. Walter, H. L. Dodge and John F. Bige- 



January 13, 1900. 



S\N 1 



«3 



low. The old officer* were re-elected, as follows 
deot. Isain 

•second Vice- President, 1 W Hellmi 
George Grant: assistant cashier. W. McGavIc > 

rorll. Bank — \V. H. Crocker. K. P Pood. 
B-own. 0, W Kline, Henry J. Crocker, (i W 
E. Green. The old officers were also reelected. 
lows: William H. Crocker, President, and G. W. 1 
cashier. 

FOLLOWING are the transactions on the Stock and 
Bond Exchange for the week beginning January Tith 
and ending January 11th : 

MISCELLANEOUS BONIW 



cusi 1: 1 .olm 
Gontr* r.>«u V. . l<>.anO01O6M 


Oakland Transit 6* 1W00 3 1 lr.' , 1 1 .' 


Hawaii 


tioaK 




. M00 1 112 , 




Lo* Am P*c K 


f lm', 


.nie Bonds 5V 




l>i« Antfl- 


■ MB 


B 1 N P 




Market rUol 


<ir.', 


9 F A S.1 V Rj v, is. nod lis 




M»rket Si. 1.1 Com 




1 Irisona 6\. 


.10.000 9 110 




M.Tl'g % '. . 9.0009116% 


9 1- Itrnnch 6S..... 


.n.noo 




Nor Ry of CI 

N P Ooaut Ky :•%... 3.000 


4 ll.: 
i IM 


I - Ooapon IS 
U. 9. Inew) 3*..._ 


113 








STOCKS. 








Water. Sharon. 


ir.t 


L'st m oar Stocks. Shares. 


Il'-t 


I.'st 


Contra Coflta Water... IN 
Sprine Valley Waler.lTyi 


sa 


JJ Han* I" Co its 

1 Hawaiian c & 9 Co... lu 


-: 


s7 


Gas akd Ei.e<tric. 












Equitable ««.« SB 


w, 




.... as 




Oakland Oa» 10 


48 




.... n»i 






Pacific Oaa ImpT'nL GB 


It 


tkaweli 


.... 880 


28« 




Pacific IJirlilini: IS 


to 






Gm and Elcclri. 




It PoauhauSPlCo... 


. .IMG 


28>i 


20 


Povueiu. 














M 


03 Miscellaneous. 








Vleorit low 


3 




.... 100 


120 


120 


Street Railroads. 




Oceanic S S Co 


.... '.« 


S« 


92 


Market street 300 


01% 


60M 








The transactions for lh< 


week amount to U,08S shares and 193.350 bonds as 



aeainst S.uST shares and lo.nnn bonds of the previous week. 

The market to-day (Thursday* closed slroiic. nearly all stocks selling up 
during* the day. 

On account of the rise In the price of raw suirars all the Suirar Stocks to-day 
went up nearly two points, closing strong- at the advoueed prices. During 
the lost few days Spring Valley has also gone up steadily, closing: to-day at 
94, The annual meeting; of the Giant Powder Co. will be held on the 21th 
inst. 

To be sare that you are drinking champagne always order a bottle 
of Mumro's. It is the wine of society. Have it servpd cold, and you 
are safe in doing the proper thing. 



THE peremptory morey raising sale that was St.. 
by J. J. O'Hrii- . goods merchants, in 

the latter part of th> with 

to fr. : has deplr • 

and now tl.. s and 

childr. 1 .1 jis, underwear, hosiery, and 

.mil furnishings as is to be found in the 
Doited States. No matter how great the crowd you are 
sure of polite attention at J. J. O'Brien's. The prices 
during this sale are sensationally low. 



The Cox Seed Company, of 411, 413 and 416 Sansome 
street, San Francisco, has just issued Seed Annual and 
Catalogue for 1900. This year the volume is more at- 
tractive than ever. It is copiously illustrated to the 
extent of 100 pages, and the cover is a floral design 
printed in several colors. Besides prices and descriptions 
of all sorts of seeds, the lists and illustrations embrace a 
great variety of palms, trees, shrubs, bulbs, climbers 
and fruits. The Seed Book is rich in practical informa- 
tion and contains a sub-catalogue of agricultural books 
and a comparative table of the foreign and English names 
of popular vegetables and herbs. 



ROLLO V. WATT, one of the representative citizens 
of San Francisco, has been elected president of the 
Young Men's Christian Association, an organization in 
whose good work he has long taken an active, helpful 
part. The association is very successful in this city, 
largely because it is officered by a class of business and 
professional men whose lives and personalities make a 
strong appeal to the "young men," for whose benefit the 
association is banded. 

Central Cafe, coffee and luncheon parlor, 211 Grant avenue. The 
place to get a line steak, tender chop, excellent coffee, tea and pure 
milk. Neat and prompt service. M. D. Christensen. proprietor. 

Ladies do not have to wear switches to cover up their defects if 
they use Smith's Dandruff Pomade in time, it cures dandruff, itch- 
ing scalp, stops falling hair and makes hair grow. Price 50c at all 

druggists. 



We Have Struck Qf{ 



We do not advertise that "we propose shortly to drill for Oil," nor do we say "our land shows good oil indi- 

catkns and we expect to strike Oil at a certain depth." What we do say is— We control 1300 ACRES OF OIL 

LAND in the McKITTRICK OIL DISTRICT, the railroad station being on our land We have one well 

that has a capacity of 150 BARRELS A DAY, and has produced 250 BARRELS A DAY without perceptibly 

diminishing the supply of Oil 

We have pipe lines both for Oil and Water. We have storage and settling tanks already built 

Six carloads of Oil were shipped the first of week. We have three Standard rigs on the property owned by 

company. Our first well, now producing is located within four hundred yards of the railroad. 

We are now drilling six other wells, and when these aie finished will keep on drilling more 



Think of these Figures 



150 Barrels of Oil will net $100 a day. 
This means a net income of $36 000 a year. 



Thirty-Six Thousand Dollars 



Is more tbim Skven Pkb Cent on 
an investment of $500,000 .... 



Our two companies operating in this tract of 1300 acres are the 

The Giant Oil Company California Standard Oil Co, 



Of which Wm. J. Dim.EE is President and 
J. M. Merrill is Vice-President. 



Of which J. M. Merrill is President and 
Wm J, Dxkgee is Vice-President. 



In each of these companies a limited 
amount of stock is offered for sale 



a d , The Low Rate of $1 per Share. 



We invite ihe closest investigaiion and comparison. For further particulars call on or write lo 

CALIFORNIA STANDARD OIL CO. GIANT OIL COHPANY 

Room 16, Second Floor Mills Building, - - - - - - - San Francisco. 

460-462 Eighth Street, Oakland, Cal. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 13, igoo. 



THE AIRY MAN. 



HE was an airy man, and he was always somewhere in 
the vicinity when a company was being promoted — if 
it was only at the bottom of the office stairs. He had a 
reputation, but he never laid claim to it when he met it by 
an unfortunate chance. People called him rich, and he 
never raised a protest. If a particularly wealthy and 
pushing city man happened to slide into society on a 
cheque-book, the Airy Man could usually point out bis 
share in the miracle. Then he took a cheque. 

It happened that the Airy Man, finding that London, 
out of the season, was, comparatively speaking, honest, 
had come down to a large — and locally called — fashionable 
seaside town to rest, retrench, and review the situation. 
As a matter of fact, he was even willing to do business if 
there happened to be any people seeking fresh schemes 
with the fresh air. 

He was uoiderfully adaptable, was the Airy Man, and 
while he would have discussed the possibility of converting 
sea water into hock with any reasonable being, he would 
have made love to and married a millionairess with fervor, 
and even grace. This was the point. There were several 
visitors said to represent millions and reputable portions 
of millions — there was a millionairess, a demi-millionairess, 
a semi-demi-rnillionairess, and a demi-semi-demi-million- 
airess, but the latter hardly counted in the eyes of the 
Airy Man; his particular favor was for the whole million- 
airess. 

As to his reason for this, he would probably have of- 
fered some pretty arguments, but they would not have in- 
cluded the fact that she was not, like the others, a pro- 
portional millionairess. 

The Airy Man had studied his object — that is to say, the 
millionairess — for three weeks, and it had "panned out," 
as he expressed it, well. She had a large house with win- 
dow boxes of expensive flowers. After dark he had stood 
one evening upon a seat on the promenade and seen, over 
the tops of fuchsias, a dinner table covered with silver, 
and two footmen covered with powder — as to their heads. 
The Airy Man placed powdered footmen at their proper 
figure. The walls were covered with pictures that looked 
like the Royal Academy at least. That again was well. 
Of course there was the millionairess (he had almost over- 
looked her), and she, like the footmen, was powdered 

with , but the Airy Man did not mind that. Certainly, 

the millionairess was the least beautiful thing in the room; 
certainly, she was older than the footmen; but the Airy 
Man had looked upon her in the full light of day upon the 
pier, and he had not flinched. The Airy Man metaphor- 
ically floated her as a company and took all the shares 
himself. 

The matter of an introduction had to be determined upon, 
and the Airy man turned it over in his mind. When he 
had finished be muttered one word to himself. It was 
"dog." 

The millionairess, like most millionairesses who are not 
young, had two pet dogs — obese twins with watery eyes — 
and these were her constant companions when she drove 
out in a landau and pair and when she walked upo". the 
Parade. 

The Airy Man ransacked the livery stables of the town 
and secured a fox terrier that was warranted to quarrel. 
An example was given in the stable yard and the Airy 
Man was pleased. 

The next time that the millionairess and hei pugs were 
walking upon the Parade, they encountered, as usual, the 
admiring glance of the Airy Man, but for the first time 
they saw his dog. 

The Airy Man's fox terrier took the matter in hand at 
once, and the millionairess screamed. It was ralbermore 
than the Airy Man had bargained for — to be bitten by his 
own dog — but he rescued the pugs and killed the fox ter- 
rier. This last act of unselfish gallantry won the heart of 
the millionairess. 

From that moment the Airy Man began to draw up his 
prospectus; things were going splendidly, for the million- 
airess had blushed through her powder. 

But, at the same time, she had evinced a certain hesita- 
tion when the Airy Man proposed a call. She suggested 
the pavilion, or the pier, or the circulating library, but 



the Airy Man wanted to touch the plate and see the pow- 
dered footman and the pictures at close quarters. 

The Airy Man was in splendid form. The shares in The 
Millionairess, Limited, were at a premium. He tickled the 
pugs and he admired the white stockings of the footman. 
He proposed. 

The millionairess seemed almost overcome. She asked 
him his Christian name, and they called each other Harold 
and Lilian. 

The Ai.-y Man descended to practical matters: he wished 
to talk of the future. 

"Ah, yes," said the millionairess; "where shall we live 
'when we are married ?' " 

The Airy Man started imperceptibly. "Here, unless 
you disiike the place," he said. 

"Here ?" queried the millionairess. 

"Why not?— capital crib," said the Airy Man. 

"Because it is impossible," said the millionairess. "This 
is not my house." 

"Not yours?" shouted the Airy Man, "Not your house, 
not your silver, not your pictures, not your powdered foot- 
men, not your carriage?" 

"No!" gasped the astonished millionairess. 

"Then," screamed the Airy Man — who was no longer 
airy — " who the are you?" 

"When Sir John Ryder comes back from Egypt I am to 
be governess to his daughters," replied the millionairess, 
with injured innocence. 

The Airy Man foamed. 



Prospective Mothers. 
Preparatory Hints: Bathing; Clothing: Habits: Fresh Air; Sec- 
ond Summer, etc.; are some of the subjects treated in "Babies," a 
book for yuung mothers sent free by Borden's Condensed Milk Co., 
N. Y., who make, Gail Borden Eagle Brand. 

One application of Smith's Dandruff Pomade stops itching scalp; 
three to six applications removes all dandruff. Try it. Price 50 
cents, at all druggists. Sample free. Address Smith Brothers. 
Fresno, Oal. 

Fine Sanitary Plumbing at J. Ahlbach's, 136 Fourth street. 

Everyone May Have the 
Luxury of a Bath 



In five minutes at any 
time of the day or night 



For One Cent 




By luivii.tr a NONPAREIL HEATER hi their bath room. 
For further particulars address: 

Nonpareil Instantaneous Water Heater Co. 

of the U. S., Inc. 

A. W. Crawford, General Agent, 324 Parrott Building. San Francisoo. 



January 13, 1900. 



BAN J I TIU 



«s 



PERSONALIS 



When Mr. CbamDenain nr»i left the Liberal Parly, 

ar.d began to be a favorite of "smart society," ther. 

it will be rc-membered, plenty of somewhat malicious 
allusions to his once having been in the screw trail' 
one occasion Mr. Chamberlain gave a singular and a 
plucky instance of how little he cared for this gossip A 
beautiful gold cup of ancient make was under discussion 
at the breakfast table, in the country house where Mr. 
Chamberlain was stopping. Various guesses were given 
as to its age. "I see there is a screw in it," said Mr. 
Chamberlain: "if you allow me to iook at the screw, I 
think I should be able to tell its age." He inspected the 
screw attentively, and then gave the exact date of the 
cup. It was some time in the eighteenth century. Here 
was an example at once of the absence of mauvaite hnnte 
and the presence of expert knowledge. 

Seated at tea on the piazza of Greeba Castle, a 

Sunday afternoon some weeks ago (writes a corres- 
pondent), were Mr. and Mrs. Hall Caine, Sir Edward 
Russell (editor of the Liverpool Daily Post), and Mr. Ken- 
drick Pyce (the celebrated organist of Manchester). The 
conversation turned on to the death of poor Harold Fred- 
eric, the Christian Scientists, and the Irvingites. The 
Irvingites, as i« known, have among their number digni- 
taries whom they call "Angels." "I once met an angel," 
said Hall Caine. "Yes," replied Sir Edward Russell, 
looking across at Mrs. Caine, "you married her." 

John Lane is a short, rather thick-set man, with a 

pointed beard and a small, reddish moustache. He is the 
very embodiment of good fellowship and geniality. Al- 
though he is, above all things, the publisher of minor 
poetry, he has not the slightest trace of that "artistic" 
manner which belongs to the people among which he 
moves. He is as bluff and hearty as any Yorkshire squire, 
and no one would suspect him, upon a first acquaintance, 
to be the high priest of artistic publishing in England and 
also in America. 

. A member of one of the great political clubs re- 
cently lost his umbrella, and put up a notice in the hall 
requesting "the nobleman" who had taken it to return it 
when he had done with it. The committee, in due course, 
desired to be informed why he had ascribed its possession 
to a peer. The member blandly referred them to the 
rule, which said that the club was composed of "noblemen 
and gentlemen," and added that no gentleman would have 
taken his umbrella! 



THERE are in San Francisco several firms whose en- 
ergetic business ability enables them to grasp the 
fleeting opportunity, and while they extend their own 
business, they at the same time advertise the city and 
help to bring its manufactured products and merchandise 
more fully before the public. This is notably true of the John 
M. Klein Electrical Works, the oldest electrical construc- 
tion company on the Coast. It has installed plants and built 
lines in almost every country from British Columbia to 
Patagonia. Its work has been successfully done in the 
Hawaiian Islands. And seeing the openiDg in Manila, it 
has secured several large contracts in that city, which 
are rapidly being pushed to a successful completion. The 
company is prepared to make estimates and contracts in 
any part of the globe. 



THE CALIFORNIA HOTEL. Dinner-Sunday, Jan. 14, 1900. 

California Oyster Cocktail. 
Sodp.— Green Turtle aux Quenelles; Consomme Lily. 
Hoes D'CEcvkes— Celery en Branohe; Mangoes: Kipe Olives; Saucisson 

Pish.— Boiled Striped Bass, Sauce Homard; Turban of Filet of Sole a l'ltal- 
ienne; Pommes Croquette. 

Boiled. — Smoked Beef Toncue, Cumberland Sauce. 

Entrees— Canape of Crab alaGiraldo; Soalops of Sweetbreads aux i etit 
Pois: Larded Tenderloin of Beef a la Theodora; Bnba au Bum. 

Roast— Prime Bibs of Beef au Jus ; Suckling Pie with Buked Apple; 
Stuffed Turkey, Cranberry Sauce. PcuOH— Oreme de Menllie Verte. 

Vegetables.— Browned Sweet. Boiled and Mashed Potatoes; BmledRice; 
String Beans a TAnelaise: Corn a la Creme ; Asparagus, Butter Sauce. 

Cold Meats— Roast Beef; Saddle of Lamb; Pate of Game; Ham. 

Salads.— Lettuce; Chicory; Escaroll; Shrimp Mayonnaise. 

Desseet.— Plum Puddine, Hard and Brandy Sauce ; Loganberry Pie ; 1 ump- 
kin Pie; Charlotte Russe ; Tutti Frutti lee Cream : Assorted Nuts, Clus- 
ter Raisins; Assorted Cakes: American, Cream, Edam, and Roquerort 
Cheese: Fruit in Season; Smyrna Figs; Tea and Coffee. 

Dishes not on this menu oan be ordered at restaurant prices. Dinner 8 to s p.m 
R. H. Warfield & Co., Proprietors. 



L. Rirrl. IJi.-rui i- i I ■ :- ,«■■. r-.... 

DDnU/lTC Bronchial 
DnUff 11 9 Troches 

Of BOSTON 

In Mxm only AtoM ImltM 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide. 



KBHTAURANT8 
POODLE ix i'. RuUorant, N. K. oorner Eddr and H«*un struts. 
PriTateilintiifr mnl l.aniiucl room*. TMepbniM 

A. B. Blajico A B. Bsdk. 

STAMP PHOTOS 
l.i ni i. n. Wood, phoUwrapblc studio. Donohoe building, Taylor 
and Market; nin in 80, ltd Ibmr Portraits; views; kodak work. 

POSTAGE BTAMP I'KAI.I 
W. I 7 . GRKANY.H27 Brannan street. Selections on approval ; any 
place in the world. 

MAKERS. 
P. F. DONDON'S San Francisco Iron Works, 3U-316-818 Main St. 
Iron work of every description designed and constructed. 

NOTARY PUBLIC 
Sands W. Forman, 138 Montgomery St., Occidental Hotel Block. 



GRAY BROTHERS 



(^oncrete and Artificial 
STONE WORK 



28 Montgomery Street, S. p. 
265 New High St., Los Angeles. 

SUPERFLUOUS HAIR 

painlp-sly and effectually 
lemovrdby the Electbic Nkkdle, One couth© of my treatment, I 
positively guarantee, extirpates thc-e unsightly imperfections with- 
out mark or injury to the most delicate skin. Consultation free and 
confidential. Instruction given in any branch of the business. 

MISS BARRETT, Dermatologist, 1207 Market St.. 0pp. City Hall, 

Telephone Main 1181. 
McMENOMY Established 1866. 

Is the leading Retail Butcher 
of Sau Francisco : : : : 

Supplying of families a specialty. 
Stalls 7, 8, and 9 California Market. 

ANNUAL MEETING 
Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 
The regular annual meet! tig of the stockholders of the Sierra Nevada Sil- 
ver Mining Company will be held at the ofliee of the company, room No. 14, 
Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

WEDNESDAY, THE 17th DAY OF JANUARY, 1900, 
at the hour of 1 o'olock p. m., for the purpose of electing a Board of Diteot- 
ors to serve for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other business 
as may come before the meeting. Transfer hooks will close on Monday, Jan- 
uary 15th, at 3 o'clock p. m. E. L. PARKER, Secretary. 
Ofliee — Room II, Nevada block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

Joseph Gillott's Steel Pens, THE AWA ^, A I G0 , 1893 

Gold Medals Paris, 1878-18)9. These pens are " the 
best in the world." Sole agent for the United States. 
Mr. Henry Hob, 91 John street. New York. 
Sold by all stationers. 

Samuel M. Shortridge, Atty-at-Law 

C'bockbb Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

School of Elocution 

Miss Elizabeth McDonald, 1927 California St. 
Delsarte ^Esthetic Physical Culture. Just formed, lessons in class to child- 
ren. Lessons private and in class. 



ST. LAWRENCE Livery and 
Sales Stable 

423 Post street, between Powell and Mason, 
San Franoiseo. Telephone No. 1323 

W. E. Bridge, proprietor. 




i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 13, 1900. 



John J Valentine, President, San Francisco. 
GbokGE E. Okay. First Vice-President, San Francisoe. 
Dudlhy EVANS, Second Vicc-l'rcsJ.teur, New York. 
AAKuN Stbin, Secretary, Sau(Francisco, 
H. U. Parsons. Assistant Secretary, New York. 
Homek S. KiN<;, Treasurer, San Francisco. 



Office of the President. 



|ell8 |argcr & ( 



ompanjg, 



$x$tts& aad $mBn$. 



Saw cFz-ancioco, '•Jecc.m&et 31, 1899. 

Dear Sir : The following is our Annual Report of Precious Metals produced in the States and Territories west of the 
Missouri River (including British Columbia and Yukon Territory), during 1S99, which shows in the aggregate : Gold, 
590,190,167 ; Silver, $38,804,498; Copper, $59,244,994 ; Lead, $15,302,248 ; Total gross result, $203,541,907. The "commercial '" 
value at which the several metals named herein have been estimated is : Silver, 60 cts. per oz.; Copper, 16 cts. per lb.; and 
i.eaa, $4.20 per cwt. 

Allowance must always be made for probable variations from reported figures, by reason of constantly increasing 
facilities for transporting bullion, ores and base metals from the mines outside of the Express and the difficulty of getting 
entirely relial le data from private sources. E'-timatrs obtained in this way are liable to be exaggerated and are, to a 
considerable degree, guesswork; but with some modifications 011 this account, made herein, the general results reached, 
while only approximately correct, may be accepted as the closest approximation possible under the circumstances. 



STATES AND TERRITORIES. 



GoldDustandBul 
lion by Express. 



Gold Dust and 

Bullion bv Oilier 

Convevances. 



Silver Bullion 
by Express. 



Ores and Base 
tiullion by Freight. 



California 

Nevada 

Oregon 

Washington 

Alaska 

Idaho 

Montana .... 

Utah 

Colorado 

New Mexico 

Arizona 

Dakota 

Texas 

Wyoming 

British Columbia and Yukon Territory . 



$13,796,498 

1.39'. 743 

800,910 

215,840 

2,495,210 

5,167,500 

2.239 532 

26,348,050 

259,896 

1,874,551 

6,750,000 

3,100 

8,950 

17,622,941 



1.595,00° 
902,600 
9So,coo 
145,000 

4,545,646 



1,341,875 

414,716 
1,090,609 



200,000 



$ '15,304 
600,672 

75,423 
175,200 

4,«5.I50 
8,725,000 

122,775 
13 344,596 

100,262 

739, "3 

250,720 

290, 200 

23,600 

4,210,000 



Total . 



$78,974,721 



$11,215,446 



$33,208,015 



$ 3,246,315 

14,400 

3,56o 

73.125 

195,200 

6,006,500 

36,802,500 

9,950,500 

34SS.267 

1 543,0^4 

16,659,14s 

46,000 

85,126 
2,030,000 



$ i8,953,H7 

2,909,415 

l,859.893 

609,165 

4,740,846 

12,736,860 

50695,000 

13,654,682 

43,180,913 

2.317.958 

20,363,421 

7,046,720 

293,300 

317,676 

23,862,941 



80,143,725 



$203,541,907 



The gross yield for 1899, shown above, segregated, is approximately as follows : 

Gold 44,^ $90,190,167 

Silver i 9r fo 38,804,498 

Copper 291V5 59,244,994 

Lead 7/„V 15,302,248 



Total $203,541,907 

The year's combinedproduct of the metals herein treated of, is the greatest in the history of the Countrie= — United Statesxf America and 
British Columbia and Yukon Territory — that of gold, 190,1(50,167, being above any previous record officially reported; ^nd the world's output of gold 
for 1899 — approximately $304,000,000 — is a mazing. Australasia increased $is,coo,ooo, the British 1'ossessions of the Northwest, $5,000,000 aud the United 
States oF America, $6,000,000. TlierapidlyincreasingproductionofSouth Africa wasarrested by the Boer war about the first of Oct.; to that timeit 
showed an iucrease over corresponding months of last year of $14,000,000. 

ANNUAL, PRODUCTS OF LEAD, COPPEE, SILVER AND GOLD IN THE STATES AND TERRITORIES WEST OF 
THE MISSOURI RIVER, INCLUDING BRITISH COLUMBIA AND YUKON TERRITORY, 1870-1899. 



Year. 


Product nsper W. F. St.Cc. 
Statements, including 
amounts from British 
Columbia and Yukon 
Territory. 


Product afterdeduct- 
ing amounts from 
British Columbia 
and Yukon Terri- 
tory. 


The Net Pro 'nets of the States and Territories west of the Missouri River, exclu- 
sive of British Columbia and Yukon Territory, divided, are as follows : 


LEAD. 


COPPER. 


HLVER. 


GOLD. 


1870 


$ 54,000,000 
58,284,000 
62,236,959 
72,258,693 
74,401,045 
• 80,889,057 

90,S75,I73 

98,421,754 

81,154,622 

75,349,501 

80,167,936 

84,504,417 

92,411,835 

90,313,612 

84,975,954 

90,181,260 

103,011,761 

104,645,959 

"4,341,592 

127,677,836 

127,166,410 

"8,237,441 

111,531,700 

104,081,591 

105,113,489 

118,164,642 

126,289,536 

153,435.469 

177,022,666 

203,541,907 


$ 52,150,000 
55,784,000 
60,351,824 
70,139,860 
71,965,610 
76,703,433 

87,2I9,S59 

95.811,582 

78,276,167 

72,68S,8S8 

77,232,512 

81,198,474 

89,207,549 

84,639,212 

81,633,835 

87,311,382 

100,160,222 

I 03,327,77o 

112,665,569 

126,723,384 

126,804,855 

117,946,565 

111,259,508 

103,827,623 

104,844,112 

117896,988 

121,949,516 

'42,853,469 

'59,359 466 

''79,678,966 


$ 1,080,000 
2 100,000 
2,250,000 
3,450,000 
3,800,000 
5,100,000 
5 ,040,000 
5,085,250 
3,452000 
4,185,769 
5,742,390 
6,361,902 
8,008,155 
8,163,550 
6,834,091 
8,562,991 
9,185,192 

9,631,073 
11,263,630 

14,593,323 
IT ,509.57I 
12,385,780 

",433,947 
7,756,040 
8,223,513 

7,170,367 
6,536,026 

8,775,144 
11,894,251 
13,667,248 




$17,320,000 
19,286.000 

19,914,429 

27,4S3,3°2 
29,699,122 

3',635,239 
39,292,924 
45,846,109 
37,24.8,137 

37,032,S57 
38,033,055 
42,987,613 
48,133.039 
42,975,101 

43,529 925 
44.5i6,599 
52,136,851 
5 o,S3j,SS4 

53152.747 
64,808,637 
62,930,831 
6j, 614, 004 
50,607,601 
38,491,521 
28,721,014 
35.274.777 
33.CS4 963 
34,034,034 
35,oSi,365 
34,594,498 


133,750,000 
34,398,000 
38,177.395 
39.206,558 
38,466,488 
39,968,194 

42,886 935 
44.8S0 223 
37,576,030 
31,470,262 
32,559,067 
30,653,959 
29,011,318 
27,816,640 
25,183567 
26,393,756 
29.5ji.424 
32,500,067 
21.9S7.702 
32.527,661 
3L795.36I 
3',6S5,u8 
29,847,444 
33,948 723 
45,623291 
48.399,729 
53,015.242 

63.655.597 
66,486,202 
72,567,226 


1871 




1872 




1873 




1874 




1S75 




1S76 




1877 




1878 




1879 




1880 


$ 898,000 
1,195,000 
4,055,037 
5,683,921 
6,086,252 
7,838,036 

9,276,755 
10,362,746 
18,261,490 

14,793,763 
20,5(19,092 
13,261,663 
T 9,37".5i6 

23,631339 
22,276,294 
27.052,115 
28,713,105 
36.388,694 
45,897.648 
58,849,994 


1881 


1882 


1883 


18S4 


1885 


1886 


[887 


1888 


1889 




1891 


(892 


<Sqx 


1894 


1895 


1896 


1897 


1898 







The exports 
•rancisco, $5,963,543- 



of Silver during the past _year to Japan, China, the Straits, etc., have been as follows: From London, $33,923,252; from San 
Total, $39,886,795. as against $32,622,032 last year. Pounds Sterling estimated at $4,8665, 



January 13, 1900. 



SAN I EWS 1 .1 IT1K 



Wnitei) Sto*ea of 9tfe*ico. 

STATEMENT OF THE PRODUCT OF COLD AKD SILVER IX THE RRPtBI.tC OR MEXICO. REVISED AND CORRKCTrD 
P* * >»77 TO 1S99;- VALORS OTON MINTAGE n.\ 



•7 



1878 . 

I88l 

18SJ-1SS3 . 
1885 

1884-1885 . 
1885-18S6 . 
1886-1887 . 
1887-1888. 
18S8-1SS9 . 
18S9-1890. 
1890- 1891 . 
1891-1S92 . 
1892-1893 . 
1893 1894. 
1894-1895 . 
1895-1896 . 
1896-1897 . 
IS97-IS98 . 
1898-1S99. 



Total. 



* 747."^' 

83I.OOO 

942,000 

1,013,000 

937.000 

956,000 

1,055,000 

914,000 

1,026000 

1,047,000 

1,031 000 

1 ,040,000 

1,100,000 

1,150000 

1,275 °°o 

1,400,000 

1,425000 

4,750,000 

5.475,000 

8,500,000 

9,925,000 

10,112.000 

$56. 701 000 



SILVER. 



TOTAL. 



$24,837,000 
35. ■ -' 

26,800,000 
29,2.-, 
19,329 
29.569,000 

3'>''< 

33,226.000 

34,112,000 

34 600000 

34,912,000 

40,706,000 

4 1 ,500.000 

43.000,000 

■15,750,000 

48,500,000 

47 250,000 

54,225,000 

54 45-.O00 

60.0X3,000 

67 525.C00 

65,310,000 



f9"2, 3^58.000 



1,000 
i 2.000 

!7,ooo 

30.266.000 

-5,000 

I.OOO 
U. 140.000 
;Sooo 
35.647,000 
35.943.oco 
41.746,000 
43 61 0.000 

4 1. 150,003 

'5.ooo 
49 900,000 

rs.ooo 

58 975,000 
59,925.000 
69,183000 
7/450000 

75 .P2.O00 



$959-03 



EXHIBIT OF COINAGE OF GOLD, SILVER AND COPPER. IN THE REPUBLIC (.F MEXICO, 
FROM THE 1ST OF JULY, 1873, TO THE 30TII OF JUNE, 1S99. 



I GOLD DOLLARS. J SILVER DOLLARS. I COPPER DOLLARS. 



1873-1874 . . 
1S74-I875 . . 
1875-IS76 . . 

1876-^77 . 
1877-1878 . . 
i8-,S-i879 . 
1879-1SS0 . . 
1880-1SS1 . . 
1881-1882 . 
1882-1S83 . . 
1S83-1SS4 . . 
1S84-188S .. 
1885-18S6 . . 
1SS6-1S87.. 
1887- 1S88.. 
188S-1889.. 
18S9-1890 . . 
1890-1891 . 
1S91-1S92 . . 
1892-1893 .. 
1893-1894. . 
1894-1895 . . 
1895-1896 . . 
1896-1897 . . 
1897-1898 . . 
1898- 1899 . . 



Total 



1866,743 
862,619 
809,401 
695,750 
691,998 
658,206 
521,826 
492,068 
452,590 
407,600 
328,698 
423,250 
425,000 
410,000 
340,320 
305,100 
243,298 
308,000 
291,940 
361,672 
553,978 
545,237 
565,786 
453,474 
459,219 
715,882 



$13,189,655 



$18,846,067 
19,386,958 
19.454,054 
21,415,128 
22.0S4.203 
22,162,987 
24,018,528 

24,6i7,395 
25,146,260 
24,083,921 

25,377,379 
25,840,728 
25,850,000 
25,600,000 
26,711,000 
25,274 500 
24,328,326 
24,238,000 
25,527,000 
27,169,876 
30,185,611 
27,628,981 
22,634,788 
19,296,009 
21,427,057 
20,184,117 



$618,488,873 



$15,966 
21,712 
30,654 
9035 
41.364 
16,300 

14,035 
42,258 
11,972 



$203,296 



Summary.— Totals: i-.old, $13189,655; Silver, 1618,488,873; Copper, $203,296. Graud Total, $631,881,824. 



EXHIBIT OF THE COINAGE OF MEXICO FROM THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE MINTS 

FISCAL YEAR OF 1899. 


IN 1537 TO THE 


END OF THE 


Colonial Epoch. 


Gold. 


Silver. 


Copper. 


Total. 




$ 8,497,950 
19,889,014 
40,391,447 


$752,067,456 
441,629,211 
888,563,989 


$200,000 
342,893 


$760,765,406 
461,518,225 
929,298,329 






INDEPENDENCE. 


$68,778,411 


$2, 082, 260,656 


$542,893 


$2,151,581,960 




$ 557.392 
45.040,628 


$ 18,575.569 
740,246,485 


$5,235,177 


$ 19,132,961 
790,522,290 


Republic. 


$45,598,020 


$758,822,054 


$5,235,177 


$809,655,251 


Eagle Coin, froin 1st July, 1873, to 30th of June, 1899 . . 


$13,189,655 


$618,488,873 


$203,296 I $631 881,824 



SUMMARY. 
Colonial Epoch — from 1537 to 1821, $2,151,581,960, Independence — from ^822 to 1873, $803,655,251 ; Republic- 
1873 to 1899, $631,881,824. Total, $3,593,119,035. 



-from 




^^^^^***3 



President. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January i?, 1900. 




THAT a pure de- 
light it has been 
to live," was the ex- 
clamation heard in many 
a drawing-room this 
week, the glorious 
weather with which we have been favored being the topic 
under discussion at the different "at homes," and of these 
there have been quite a number. On Tuesday Mrs. A. M. 
Burns received, on Wednesday Mrs. James Jerome, and 
Mrs. Adolph Roos gave her first reception in Her beautiful 
new home on Jackson street; on Thursday there was the 
engagement reception at Mrs. Ehrman's; Mrs. Danforth 
and Mrs. Jewett were also at home; and on Friday Mrs. 
Wakefield Baker, Mrs. Crocker, Mrs. Scott, Mrs. Hough- 
ton and Mrs. Josselyn all received. 

The new year so far has been noted for the number of 
pleasant theatre parties given. Lawrence Scott, Henry 
Holbrook, Sam Boardman and Ed Greenway have been 
among the hosts of these pleasant affairs, which were 
either preceded by dinners or followed by suppers. 

The Nevada concert drew a large number of the fash- 
ionable world to the California on Monday night, and the 
debut of Mrs. Neville Castle — or Miss Mary Scott as she 
is billed — was the ration d'llre which filled it again on 
Tuesday night. 

On Wednesday evening the Olympic Club entertained its 
lady friends, the Chinese "kids" coming in for the applause 
of the evening. 

Pink and white were the colors most in evidence at the 
residence of Mr. James V. Coleman on Laguna street last 
Wednesday, where, at the hour of noon, Miss Gertrude 
Porman became the bride of Arthur J. Brander. The 
ceremony was performed by the Rev. Father Varsi in a 
bower of pink and white roses placed in the drawing-room, 
and in the presence of a limited number of friends and rel- 
atives, who after the ceremony partook of a dtjruner at 
which many pretty toasts were offered and responded to. 
The bride looked very handsome in a tailor-made gown of 
mauve colored cloth trimmed with white satin, and wore 
a becoming little hat to correspond; she was attended by 
Miss Grace Spreckels as maid-of-bonor, who wore a gown 
of green crepe and a large black hat The groom was 
supported by J. P. Redington as best man. Later in the 
day Mr. and Mrs. Brander departed for Del Monte for a 
brief honeymoon, which will be supplemented by a trip to 
Australia, whence they sail on the steamer Moana on the 
24th. 

On last Wednesday, in Washington City, took place one 
of the most brilliant functions of the wiuter season in the 
National Capital, the occasion being the marriage of Miss 
Cecilia Miles, daughter of the Commanding General of the 
army, to Captain Samuel Reber, U. S. A. The wedding 
was at St. John's Church, which was crowded with a 
brilliant throng of guests, including President McKinley, 
his Cabinet and their wives, the Foreign Ministers. Su- 
preme Court Judges, prominent army and navy digni- 
taries and civic officials. Miss Anna Hoyt officiated as 
maid-of-honor, Max Reber as his brother's best man; the 
bride's other attendants were Miss Lowery of Washing- 
ton, Miss Reber of St. Louis, Miss Jessie Grey of Balti- 
more, Miss Deering of Washington, and Miss Rosina Hoyt 
of New York. 

It is quite surprising what experts the young ladies are 
becoming in ordering gastronomic entertainments. The 
menus at some of the recent luncheons were tempting to 
a degree. A luncheon is a favorite mode of doing honor to 
a number of young ladies, while dinners take the lead 



when engaged couples are to be the chief guests. Among 
recent hostesses in both are Miss Caro Crockett, Miss 
Kathryn Dillon, Miss Ollie Holbrook and Miss Mary Scott. 
Miss Watson's tea and Mrs. George Gibbs' luncheon are 
among recent holiday entertainments. Dinners have, how- 
ever, been the chief dissipation of the present week, and 
among the hostesses were Mrs. Crocker, Mrs. Spreckels, 
Mrs. Louis Gerstle, and Mrs. W. H. Taylor, whose dinner 
was in honor nf the son of the house, Gus Taylor, and his 
bride-elect, Miss Helen Hopkins. The fifty guests present 
were seated at four beautifully flower-decked tables. 
Orchestral music was an adjunct to the feast, and after- 
wards there was dancing. 

Mrs. Van Wyck's Club gave its dance at Golden Gate 
Hall on Monday evening, where the Colonials also had a 
dance en Wednesday evening; to-night the Saturday Fort- 
nightlies will have theirs at Cotillion Hall; the Friday Fort- 
nightlies will meet as usual next Friday evening. 

AmnDg other affairs or the tapis for next Saturday: 
Mrs. Jane Stanford will give a reception from two till six 
o'clock at her California-street mansion, when President 
Jordan, the Faculty and Trustees of Stanford University 
will be the honored guests of the occasion. 

The Mardi Gras balls given at the San Francisco Art 
Institute on Nob Hill have always been looked forward to 
as a fitting finale of the winter season, and the decision of 
the directors some time ago that none should take place 
this year was a disappointment to many who usually 
attend these functions. Therefore the recent announce 
ment that the Art Institute people had reconsidered that 
determination and the decision reached that one should 
take place as usual will no doubt give pleasure to the dis- 
appointed ones. It is further said that no efforts will be 
spared to have the forthcoming ball — which will be a 
masked one — eclipse in every way every other ball given 
under their auspices, so there is joy ahead for the beaux 
and belles. 

There was an inclination among the buds to indulge in a 
little wailing when it became known that Mrs. W. G. Ir- 
win had decided to spend the ensuing few months abroad, 
that very hospitable lady doing so much for their enjoy- 
ment. However, she has very considerately named the 
time for her departure in the early part of the Lenten 
season when gay doings will no longer be "good form;" so 
dry up ynur tears, maidens fair, there is time yet for the 
several functions with which she is credited as "arrang- 
ing" before that date arrives. 

Miss Mary Crocker made her formal de'but in New York 
society at a dance given last evening by her cousin, Mrs. 
Whitelaw Reid. Miss Crocker has become a great favor- 
ite in Gotham's swim, and has been quite a noted figure at 
the functions she has already appeared at there this win- 
ter. 

Mr. Will Thornton arrived from his trip through the 
Orient and Manila by the last steamer, his wife, nie Ellie 
Hensley arriving from Portland to meet him here the fol- 
lowing day. They are at the Palace Hotel for a brief stay. 

Frederick C. Hotaling has returned from Europe and 
will shortly go to Cpronado. Mrs. A. P. Hotaling, Jr., 
has settled in Paris for the winter. 

The annual meeting of the Occidental Kindergarten As- 
sociation took place January 8tb, 1900, and the following 



P IDE^TttitgpSIgREg 




January 13, 1900. 



SAN 1 



•9 



officers were elected : Presidei ■ rlr»l 

iont, Mrs. Stela; Second Vice-President, Miss Ra- 
Treasurer. Miss Steinbart; Correspond 1 
tarv. m W. Frank; Recording Secretary 

Carrie Frank. 

The Thomas Welton Stanford Library was formally ded- 
icated in Assembly Hall at Stanford I'hiversily 
day afternoon, Professor Ueortre Elliott Howard di 

■ e dedication address. The other addresses were l>v 
-lebbins, Herbert C. Nash, the liorarian, and Presi- 
dent Benjamin Ide Wheeler, of the University of Cal ! - 
fomia. 

Last week Admiral and Mrs. Kautz, Captain Goodrich 
and tbe officers of the U. S. S. Iowa gave a reception and 
dance to some two hundred guests from Hotel del Coron- 
ado and San Diego, and last Mondav the officers of the 
flagship Philadelphia entertained a like numher. 

The past has been one of the gayest months in the social 
history of Hotel del Coronado. The naval ball given by 
the hotel management in honor of Admiral and Mrs. Eautz 
and the officers of the Pacific squadron wintering in the 
San Diego harbor was attended by 650 guests. Music was 
supplied by the marine band of the flagship Philadelphia. 
The decorati >ns of the ballroom exceeded in beauty any- 
thing previously attempted, hundreds of flags, signal and 
pennant being used, besides -an abundance of palms, cut 
and potted flowers. Refreshments were served to all the 
guests of the occasion. New Year's was a busy day at 
this resort. A golf tournament occupied the greater 
part of the day, Miss Helen Healy and Miss Jarecki win- 
Ding the ladies' first and second prizes, while Dr. Evans of 
the cruiser Marblehead won the gentleman's first, and J. 
P. Gardiner the second. Dr. and Mrs. Arnold of San 
Francisco gave the prizes, hand-made golf clubs, for this 
event. In the evening a New Year's ball was held at the 
hotel. During the early part of the evening Mrs. Col. 
Lockett, assisted by the Misses Healy, gave a reception 
to a number of army and naval friends. Mr. and Mrs. 
France E. Bacon of Boston gave a New Year's banquet to 
one hundred guests in the private banquet room of the 
hotel. The reception of New Year's afternoon given by 
Mrs. Sturges and the Misses Sturges of Chicago at their 
private apartments was an elaborate and charming 
affair, attended by 150 persons, including many officers of 
the Pacific squadron. 

Yesterday society was out in full force to attend the 
Mills Club reception in honor of Madame Emma Nevada. 
Mrs. Palmer Nevada is a graduate of Mills' College, and 
all of her old friends were at the Century Club to greet 
her. Mrs. Prank Bates, President of the Mills Club, was 
assisted in receiving by Mrs. C. T. Mills, Mrs. J. Homer 
Fritch, Mrs. Walter Byington, Miss Jane Klink and 
Mrs. Wendell Easton. Mrs. Stewart Baldwin had 
charge of the tea room, assisted by Miss E. Everding, 
Miss Mabel Phillips, Miss Persis Coleman and Miss Grace 
Unger. 

Among the week's guests at the Hotel Rafael were: 
Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Burke, W. A. Allen, W. G. Warren, 
Mr. and Mrs. George F. Milliken, Frederick H. Dakin and 
wife, Louis Honig, Clarence C. Dakin, Fred H. Dakin Jr., 
Charles T. Dosier, Edward McCutchen, C. W. Willard, 
Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Magee Sr., Samuel Newsome, and 
Mr. and Mrs. Julius Van Vliet. 



The most delicious coffee, rolls, and cake, moderate 

prices, at Roemer's Original Vienna Cafe, 205 Kearny, 
near Sutter. 

Napa Soda Springs new management. Two hours from San 
Francisco. Open all the year. Try it from Saturday to Monday. 
A. Dollman proprietor, A. Gotard chef. 



Miss Pierce, formerly teacher of arts at Newman & Levinson's 
has opened a studio at 609 Polk St. Lessons given. Or ders taken 

PERSONAL— If your hair is not satisfactory it can be made so 
safely, quickly, lastinely, and at slieht expense. Gray hair 
restored to its original color, bleached hair to any shade, falling hair stop- 
ped, luxuriant hair produced. Booklet and particulars free. Imperial 
Chemical Mfe. Co., 22 West 23d St., New York, Dept. No. 66. 

In San Pranoisco sold by: GOLDSTEIN & COHN, 822 Market street; S. 
8TR0ZYNSK1, 24 Geary street, OWL DBTJG COMPANY, 1128 Marke 
■treet; and all druggists and hah* dressers. 



Can You Tell? 

Sbortatorj Publishing 

pariv. 149-1S4 High Street Boston, 
llpa> $4,200 in sums of $100 
to $500, for clean, clever original, un- 
usual stories of 1 500 to 6 000 words 
i. r publication in THE BLACK CAT. 
Bach stor> will be judged solely upon 
its merits without regard to the name 
or reputation of its writer, and the 

$4200 Rewards 

will be paid incash. But nostory will 
be considered at all unless it is sent 
strictly in accordance with the print- 
ed conditions, which will be mailed 
free, together with many of the names 
and addresses, as references, of the 
men and women in 
all parts of America 
who have received 
over $30,000 cash 
for BLACK CAT 
stories If you or 
your friends can tell 
a clever story, write at once for partic- 
ulars, as the contest closes in March. 




San Francisco ^ m - Larse n - Mana s er 
Novelty Leather Co. 

Manufacturers of the California Brand Ladies' and Gents' 
Fine Belts and Pocket Books. All kinds of Leather 
Novelties. Leather and Canvas Sporting Goods. 
Our Specialty: Mexican Carved Leather Goods. 
Medical. Surgical and all kinds of Drummers' Cases. 



412 Market street, 



Telephone Bush 94 



San Francisco 



You cannot diminish drunkenness without diminishing crime, 
insanity, pauperism, and taxes. 

All this is done by 



The... K EELEY 
Institutes 



At 1170 Market Street, 
Donohoe Building, S. F. 



Or Carson City, Nevada. 



H. IsaaC JoneS, Pi. D. Eye. Ear, Nose, and Throat. 

Office — 234 Post street, between Grant avenue and Stockton 

streets, S. F. Hours, 10 a. m. to 4. p. m. 

Sunday by appointment. Tel. Grant 10 



MUSIC 



Complete depart 
ments iu nil 
_ branches ol 
MDSIC, ELOCUTION, DRAMATIC ART 

SCHOOL Or PIANO TUNING 

Pacific Coast Conservatory of Music 

!The Leading Conservatory o'F "the West Cn 
equalled Free Advantages. Send for beautifully 
illustrated Catalogue. 

H. TOURJEE, DIRECTOR 
526 Sutter Street. San Francisco Ca. 



20 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 13, 1900. 




BANKING 



STOLEN FROM THIEVES. 



— He had married a Johannesburg heiress and had ac- 
cepted the couple of hundred thousand that came with her 
as if they were merely his due. One day she took him to 
task. "You are always talking of your carriages, and 
your horses, and your yacht. Don't you think that, for a 
change, you might talk of these things as being ours? 
That evening when the lady had come down into the 
drawing-room before dinner she heard a tremendous dis- 
turbance going on upstairs in her husband's dressing-room 
and her bed-room, and hurrying up found her husband in 
a state of nudity overturning everything and flinging the 
furniture about. "My dear," replied the brutal man, to 
her astonished queries, "I am only looking for our new 
pair of dress trousers." 

— Freddie — You know that part of the play where the 
man seizes the woman, forces her into a cupboard, and 
turns the key on her? Charlie — Yes, I remember it. 
Freddie— Well, last night, a fellow in the audience ap- 
plauded it so that they had to put him out. Charlie — I 
don't think there is anything to applaud about that part 
of the play. Freddie — Ob, but it turned out that the 
fellow applauding was the husband of the actress, and it 
was the first time he had ever seen anybody shut her up. 

— Early in her long and virtuous career, Lovely 
Woman had been led to the hymeneal altar. Her wedded 
life was not all charlotte russe and ice cream, and dia- 
logues of a more or less vehement sort were frequent, but 
the dear girl felt very wild when the husband of her 
choice snarled, "I can't stand a woman who snores." 
"Snores?" yelled Lovely, "you are the first man who ever 
dared to tell me so." 

— He — He that courts and runs away will live to court 
another day. She — But he that courts and does not wed, 
may find himself in court instead. 

— Miss Spinster — Will you kindly tell me whether my 

Miss Pert (interrupting)— Yes, your wig is on 

straight. 

— Coachman — What pretty children I Are they 
madame's? Housekeeper — The Judge hasn't decided 
yet. 

— This would be a quiet, peaceable world were it not 
for the movements of the under-jaw. 

— There is a pork sausage maker in Birmingham who 
employs only Jews. Careful man that. 

— Penn— Is Bobber wedded to his art? Brushe — No, 
to his model. 

— Life is worth living better than most of us live it. 

CHICAGO IN THREE DAYS 

Via Chicago, Union Pacific and Northwestern Line every day in the 
year from San Franciaco at 8:30 a. m. Baflet, smoking, library cars, 
with barber. Double drawing-room sleeping cars. Dining cars — 
meals a la carte. Breakfast in Diner on leaving Oakland Pier. 
Daily through tourist car to Chicago without change at 6:30 p. m. 
R. R. Ritchie, General agent Pacific Coast, 2 New Montgomery 
treet, (Palace Hotel) San Francisco. 

THE "OVERLAND LIMITED ■' -A Solid Vestibuled Train 
Via the UNION PACIFIC leaves San Francisco daily at 8.00 a. m. 
Breakfast served in dining Car. 

Three days to Chicago without change. One day quicker than 
any other line. 

Finest modern Pullman equipment, including library and buffet 
cars and dining cars, a la carte. D. W. Hitchcock. No. 1 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco. 

ASK THE TICKET AGENT to send you from Chicago to New 
York, Boston, or other Eastern cities, over the Nickel Plate [N. 
Y. C. & St. L. R. R.] Quick time, satisfactory service and no 
extra fares charged passengers. Jay W. Adams, Pacific Coast 
Passenger Agent, 37 Crocker Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



The most comfortable way to travel to Portland and all points 
in the Northwest is by the steamers of The Oregon Railroad & 
Kavigation Co., E. C. Ward, General Agent, 630 Market street, 8. F. 



London and San Francisco Bank, Limited 

Authorized Capital, 83,500,000. Capital Subscribed and Fully Paid, $2,450,000 I 

N- D. Rldeout, Managing Director 

Gustav Frlederieh, Cashier 

Arthur L. Black, Assistant Cashier 

HEAD OFFICE— 71 Lombard street, London. 
PORTLAND BRANCH— Chamber of Commerce Building. 
TACOMA BRANCH— 1156 Pacific Avenue. 

Bankers—Bank of England, London Joint Stock Bank, Limited. 
Agents in New York — J. P. Morgan & Co. 

This bank is prepared to grant letters of credit available in any part of the 
world and to transact every description of banking and exchange business 

Bank of British Columbia 

S. E. cor. Bush and Sanaome Sts. Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 

HEAD OFFICE: 60 Lombard St., London. 

Capital Paid Up, $3,000,000. Reserve Fund, $500,000. 

BRANCHES— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kainloops, Nani- 
amo. Nelson Rossland, Sandon, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon. 

This bank transacts a general banking business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to check, and special deposits received. Commercial credits granted ' 
available in all parts of the world. Approved bills discounted and advances I 
made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates upoit its 
head office and branches, and upon its agents, as follows: 

New Yoek — Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago — First National Bank; 
Liverpool — North and South Wales Bank; Scotland — British Linen Com- 
pany; Ireland — Bank of Ireland; Mexico — London Bank of Mexico: South 
America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and Japan — 
Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and New Zea- 
land — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
Ld.; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies) — Colonial Bank. 

Also on Dawson City, Yukon district, arrangements having been made 
with the Canadian Bank of Commerce whereby it is prepared to issue drafts 
and letters of credit on that bank at above point, and transact other banking 
business. Terms upon application, 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Coe. Sansomb and Suttee Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 Paid-TJp Capital, J2.000.000 

Reserve Fund, 8350.000 

HEAD OFFICE— 40 Threadneedle street, London. E. C. 

AGENTS: New York — Agency of the London. Paris and American Bank, 
Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y. : Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 
Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM, O. ALTSCHUL. Managers. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Pine and Sansome Sts., San Francisco, 
Jas. K. Wilson, President Wm. Pierce Johnson. Vice-President 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL, $500,000 

DLRECTORS—James K. Wilson, D. J. Staples, Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo. 
A. Pope. H. E. Huntington, John Barton, C. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS ; New York— Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank; 
Chemical National Bank, Boston—National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co.; Chicago—Continental National Bank. St. Louis 
— The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City—First National Bank. London- 
Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co. 

Germania Trust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital, $1,000,000 Paid-Up Capital and Reserve, $375,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator, Guardian, or Trustee. 

Check Accounts of individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 

Legal Depository for money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
paid on trust deposits and sayings. Investments carefully selected 
for our clients. 

Board of Directors — Ernst A. Denicke, F. Kronenberg, J. C. Rued, A. 
Sbarboro. F. C. Siebe, Albert G. Wieland, H. P. Sonntag, John Rapp, H. 
Brunner. 

Officers— Ernst A. Denicke, President; F. Kronenberg, vice-President; H. 
Brunner Cashier 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Coe. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Head Office — 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 

Subscribed 3,000.000 

Agents at New York-- J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the world. 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion. 

IGN. STEINHART, P. N. LILLENTHAL. Managers. 



Paid Up $1,500,000 

Reserve Fund... 700,000 



Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 
Interest paid on deposits. Loans made. 
DLRECTORS. 



William Alvord 
William Babcock 
Adam Grant 



S. L. Abbot. Jr. 
O. D. Baldwin 
W. S. Jones 



H. H. Hewlett 
E. J. MoCutchen 
R. H. Pease 



January 13, 1900. 



BAN I'KV HEWS I 1 I III; 



31 



cor; 


pgl^^^SkTO 


■i-Y*S * 


<&$( 


K^M^Jl^^S 





A THOUGHT FOR O-SHIROI -FUJI- SAN.-tWfi «o»st,<« rat too.x, 

■ir frolicsome laughter ami liiten, O flower-eyed. 

-urns murmur of Ibe under-ronning tide. 
In-, limning the Song of Nightfall, a melody strangely sweet, 
And the winds on the strings of the samisen its monotones repeat. 

The sea is a mirror of copper and the sky is a sea of flame. 

And the pink on the sail of the shallop and the rose on your lips is 

the same 
That over your satin cheeks and your gay little gown has spread. 
And has lacquered your burnished hair with the lustre of metal-red. 

For the God in the 8un is dying. His great and passionate heart 

Deep in the west has burned the barrier clouds apart, 

And be sinks through the yielding cirrus to his sleep in the water 

kissed 
By gilded grey and the glory of lucent amethyst. 

Suppose, little White- Wistaria, that you and your lover were dead, 
And away from the World of Men to the World of Gods had sped — 
Would you stay your opening wings and forget your maiden flight 
For the pleasure of floating forever in this ruddy, alluring light? 

On the breast of the River of Heaven in a boat built of Wishes and 

Hopes, 
Woven of joy tbe sails of her and of Memories the ropes, 
Into this flood of beauty, of color, of warmth, of peace, 
Your spirit and mine a-sailing on a voyage that should never cease. 

You and I in the boat, and the roguish moon in the South 
Sending to lift our keel a breath from her smiling mouth; 
You and I with above ns Love's oriflamme unfurled 
Pursuing the flying sunset around and around the world 1 



A MA3QUERADER.— christian burke- in Blackwood's magazine- 

Sorrow once wearied of his sad estate, 

And finding Pleasure sleeping in the sun, 

Put on his mantle, bargaining with Fate 

That she should tell of the exchange to none; 

Then through tbe city gates he made his way, 

And eager crowds flocked 'round from far and near, 

But some who strove to grasp his garments gay 

Shrank back, they knew not why, with sndden fear. 

And there were those who gave him of their best, 

Who set before him a most royal feast, 

Doing him homage as a kingly guest — 

Till, as the music and the mirth increased, 

One peered beneath his hood, and saw with wild surprise 

The sombre Spirit looking out from Sorrow's eyes! 



A KERCH I EF.— cunton bcouard. 



A filmy fabric, it is true, 

As soft as down and bright as amber, 
Brocaded with gay threads as blue 

As flowers that up my trellis clamber. 

Upon one silky side behold, 

Embroidered neat, some blooming roses, 
While on the other, flecked with gold, 

A bright-winged butterfly reposes. 

And though 'tis but a trifle, yet 

A something sweet upon it lingers ; 

'Tis neither "rose" nor "mignonette," 
But the faint touch of fairy fingers 1 



THE SUICIDE — edwin mabkham, in scbibneb's- 

Toil-worn, but trusting Zeno's mad belief, 
A soul went wailing from the world of grief: 

A wild hope led the way, 

Then suddenly— dismay I 

Lo, the old load was There— 

The duty, the despair! 
Nothing had changed : still only one escape 
From its old self into the angel shape. 



BANKING 



Bank of California, San Francisco 

1 



■ 



IB ..f New York. M 
lunk. I 

.iv in lt- Bank: Union National Hunk 

flank. SI. l.oui- I!, 
nnk ..I • 
■.ri. ttc 1 

Oilim, Japan, 



»llll 1M M.Vllllll i, , P ;| nil |„ 

1IJ.CN M 1 1 *\ 

- PRKN ll~- -Ml ill. \ 

001 

lUlllinnre-Tlic Xnli 

flunk. • 

1'l.lln.lcll.liin l-li.lu.l, H.l.i:, - 

Vlnrliili. ' ii'. v. \. 

!». M Rothschild S\ Bona. I 

llnchalt, 
ink ■ <! India, Australia, and 1 ,11a an 

1 nlon Bank ..1 Australia, Ltd., and Bank "I sv« Zcali 
totters 01 oradll laauad avmllaMa in nil parti "f the worrd. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

MS CAMI'OKNI , STIIKIrr. S. F. 

Deposits Jul* 1. UN, iM.MMHe Reserve Fund totVi-, 

Paid-up Capital i.imo.ooo Contingent Fund 

fv,?,-!'! 1 ^,' 1 ;,^^'''''" «•. f. n. DeFRBMERY, \ 

LOVEIi white. Oat r H. M. WELCH, Assistant Cashier 

Directors— Georse w. Beaver, Thomu Heave, VV. f. it. da Premerr Al- 
bert Miller, Robert Watt, GeorEe G, Boardman, Daniel B. Martin, Geom 
Tasheira, E. B. Pond. 

11- upon San Frandsoo and Oakland real estate, and (arms and Inrmino 
lands In the country, 

Receives deposits, C itry remittances may lie miulc in oheoka payable 

m Ban Franolsco, Post oniee. or WeiN Parse A c<>.'» Honey Or.i»-r*. or coin 

by Express, but the responsibility ol this hank commences only with the 
reeeipl ol the money. 

No charge Is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: a. m. to .1 p. m., ami Saturday evenings, for receipt of do- 
posits only. 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 



Wells Fargo X Go. Bank 

N. E. Con. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

JOHN J. VALENTINE. President H. -WADSAVORTH. Cashier 

HOMER S. KING, Manager F. L. IJPMAN. Assistant Cashier 

H. L. MrLLER, Second Assistant Cashier. 

Cash Capita] and Surplus $6,250,000 

Branches— New York City, H. B. Parsons. Cashier: Salt Lake City, J. E. 

Dooly, Cashier: Portland, Or., R. M. Dooly, Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— John J. Valentine, Andrew Christeson, Oliver Eldridtre. 

Henry E. Huntington, Homer S. Kinc, George E. Gray, John J. McCook. 

John Bermineham, Dudley Evans. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Buildinc 

Guaranteed Capital 81.000,000. Paid Up Capital $300,000 

James D. Phelan. President S. G. Murphy. Vice-President 

George A. Story, Cashier John A. Hooper, Vice-President 

C. B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier. 

"Rate of Interest on L^ans secured by improved 
San Francisco Real Estate - - SIX PER CENT 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 
Deposits may be sent by postal order, Wells, Farpo <fe Co., or Exchange on 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 52G CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,213, 1-16.59 

Capital actually paid up in Cash LOOT TOO 00 

Deposits December 30. 1809 2S,563.r.r.r..[l 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President. B. A. Becker; First Vice-President 
Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstman: Cashier, A. H. R, 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann: Secretary, George Tourny 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller; General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Ign. SMnhart, E. Rohte, H. B. Russ, D. N. Walter, N. Ohlandt, and John 
Lloyd 

Continental Building Xt Loan Association 

OF CALIFORNIA. 



Established in 1889. 
Subscribed Capital. ..$8,000,000 

Paid-in -Capital 1,300.000 

Dr. Ed. E. Hill, President 



222 Sansome St.. San FranciBco, Cal. 

Profit and Reserve Fund... $175,000 
Monthly Income, over 75,000 

Capt. Oliver Eldridge, Vice-President 



Wm. Corbin, Secretary and General Manager 



Crocker- Wool Worth National 



Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 



Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Sts. 

Paid-np-Capital $1,000,000 

Wm. H. Crocker, President Geo. W. Kline, Cashier 
W. E. Brown, Vice-President W. Grego, Jr., Assistant Cashier 
Direotors— W. H. Crocker, E. B. Pond, W. E. Brown, 0. E. Green, G. \V. 
Kline, Henry J. Crocker, G. W. Scott. 

Worthington Ames 

neraber Stock and Bond Exchange 

Broker In Stocks, Bonds, and Municipal Securities 

Sale Deposit Building:, 32d Montgomery street. Telephone Main 1881 



BAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 13, 1900. 




MfaU&*M 




«B* Ml) SABtQMi-SI 



Capital Subscribed $4,482,760 

LONDON ASSURANCE. c ap itaip a ia u P 2,241.376 

Assets 19,196,146 

Capital Subscribed $6,000,000 

OCEAN MARINE. Capital Paid Up 600,000 

Assets 2,502,060 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE 
Justice Mining Company. 
Location of principal place of business — San Francisco. Cal. Location of 
works— Gold Hill, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 4th day of January, 1900, an assessment (No. 67) of Five (5) cents 
per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable im- 
mediately in United States gold coin to the secretary, at the office of the 
company, room 40, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 
THE Tth DAY OF FEBRUARY. 1900 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction, and unless pay- 
ment is made before, will be sold on WEDNESDAY, the 28th day of Febru- 
ary, 1900, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the cost of adver- 
tising and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

R. E. KELLY, Secretary 
Office: Room 40, Nevada block. 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Best & Belcher Mining Company. 
Location of principal place of business — San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
works — Virginia District. Storey County, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting of the Board of Directors, held on 
the fifth (5th) day of January, 1900, an assessment. No. 69, of fifteen 
cents (15c.) per share was levied upon the capital stock of the corpora- 
tion, payable immediately in United States gold coin to the Secretary, at 
the office of the company, room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, 
San Francisco, Cal. 
Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on the 
9th DAY OF FEBRUARY, 1900, 
will be delinquent and advertised for sale at public auction; and unless pay- 
ment is made before, will be sold on FRIDAY, the 2d day of March, 
1900, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertis- 
ing and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

M. JAFFE, Secretary. 
Office— Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Paauhau Sugar Plantation company. 
Dividend No, 11, 35 cents per share, of the Paauhau Sugar Plantation Co., 
will be payable at the office of the company, 327 Market street, on and after 
Wednesday, January 10, 1900. Transfer books will close on Saturday, Janu- 
ary 6, 1900. at 12 o'clock m. E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

San Francisco. December 29, 1899. 
At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this society, held 
this day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of three and one-quarter 
(3/4) per cent per annum on all deposits for the six months ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1899, free from all taxes and payable on and after January 1, 1900. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 
Office: Corner Market, McAllister and Jones streets, San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

The Continental Building and Loan Association of California. 

The Continental Building and Loan Association of California has declared 
for the six months ending December 31, 1889, a dividend of 12 per cent per 
annum to class "A" stock, 10 per cent per annum to Class "F" stock, 6 per 
cent per annum on Term Deposits, and 5 per cent per annum on Ordinary 
Deposits. 

Capt. Oliver Eldridge. President. William Corbin, Secretary. 

Office: 222 Sansome street. San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1899, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of three (3) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Tuesday, January 2. 191)0. 

GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 

Office: 33 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 
The Board of Directors declared a dividend for the term ending December 
31, 1899, at the rate of three and sixty one-hundredths (3 60) per cent per an- 
num on Term Deposits, and three (3) per cent per annum on Ordinarj De- 
posits, free of taxes, and payable on and after January 2, 1900. Dividends 
not called for are added and to bear the same rate of dividend as the principal 
from and after January 1, 1900, 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office: 101 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
San Francisco Savings Union. 
For the half year ending with the 31st of December, 1899, a dividend ha 
been declared at the rate per annum of three and three-fourths (3%) pe 
cent, on term deposits, and three and one-eighth 18%) per cent, on ordinary- 
deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Tuesday. January 2, 1900. 

LOVELL WHITE, Cashier. 
Office: 532 California street, corner Webb, San Francisco, Cal. 



WINSTON CHURCHILL, 

M R. Winston Churchill (Lord Randolph's sod), who has 
J'l gone to the front as one of the correspondents of the 
London Morning Post, inherits some of Lord Randolph's 
gifts. He has served in the British Army as a cavalry 
officer, but he was so seldom with bis regiment, and so 
often engaged in recording and criticising the deeds of 
generals in the field, that he fell in with the growing 
opinion that there was something irregular in a subaltern 
holding such a position with regard to his military 
superiors, and resigned his commission to devote himself 
to novel-writing, politics, and war correspondence. He 
was in Cuba with Martinez Campos during the first stage 
of the insurrection, and he saw fighting among the North- 
western Passes of India and on the "stricken field" of 
Omdurman. His colleague will find in him a loyal helper, 
but at the same time a rival, for Churchill is one of the 
coming men. Oddly enough there is another Winston 
Churchill in the world of letters, who is also a novelist. 
He is here in the United States, and the two namesakes 
(with such very unusual names) are continually being 
mixed up with each other in American paragraphs. 

THE advertising agency of Nelson Chesman & Co. com 
pleted last month its twenty-fifth year of continuous 
business. The quarter of a century during which it has 
grown from modern proportions to its present magnitude 
has marked the evolution and systematizing of the adver- 
tising agency business as a science, and it is difficult to 
realize what few precedents the founder of the firm had to 
guide himself by when he, in partnership with Mr. George 
P. Rowell, commenced business in St. Louis on November 
1, 1874. To Mr. Chesman is largely due the credit of hav- 
ing inaugurated what may be described as systematic ad- 
vertising. His firm started out with the fixed idea that 
advertising pays, whether local or national, provided the 
requirements and policy of each individual advertiser are 
carefully studied, and proper care exercised in the selec- 
tion of mediums. 

DR. Byron W. Haines, of San Francisco, has justl 
patented an invention that promises to be of iDestim-l 
able use to the occupants of and visitors to modern tall] 
buildings. It is in the nature of an elevator escape. The] 
elevator cage is arranged with an opening at the top, and , 
when the cage is caught between floors, as is so often the! 
case, an adjustable ladder is run up through the opening, i 
thereby permitting the passengers to make their exit at 
the nearest floor above. The patent is a useful one, audi 
it would not be a bad idea for the powers that be to make* 
its use compulsory on the part of all elevator owners. 

PARKER'S COUGH CURE. 
A Sovereign Remedy. One dose will stop a cough. It never fails. 
Try it. Price, 25 cents. George Dahlbender & Co., 214 Kearny 
street. For sale by all druggists. 



The time is rife to have your carpets taken up and made clean and 
new. Nothing so dangerous to health and appearances as unclean 
carpets. The Spauldmg Carpet Cleaning Works, 353 Tehama street/* 
employs expert artisans and uses special machinery. Quick work 
and easy prices. 

Do you know that Smith's Dandruff Pomade has cured thousands 
of cases of dandruff, itching scalp, eczema and falling hair when all) 
other remedies have failed? Price 50c at all druggists. Sample Free.', 
Address Smith Bros.. Fresno. Cal. 



Swear off with the New Year— that is to say swear off drinking .! 
dnbious whiskies. The J. F. Cutter and Argonaut brands are*, 
whiskies for the wise. E. Martin & Co., 411 Market street, are sole* 
agents for the United States. 



Allen's Press Clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomery street, San Francisco, 
deals in all kinds of newspaper information, business, personal, political.' 
from press of State, coast and country. Tel. Main 1042 

The Drummers' Inn 

105 Sansome street, San Francisco. 

Robi. D. Hagerty, proprietor 



Frank Carr. 

The Manhattan Cafe 



Telephone Main 5611. 



25 Geary Street. 

Ladies' Cafe and Wine Rooms, 25 Brook Place, S. F. 



January 13, 1900. 

INSURANCE I INSURANCE 



»3 



TMK N.'w York Lifo. in its annual statement, sets 
forth the entire tontine fund of the com par ■■ 
different classes, apart from the general statement. This 
is the first time this has been done by any life company. 
Heretofore the liabilities to the company and thr 1 
to the policy holder have been past finding out. 

The Ni IW* Letter in a previous issue spoke of the case 
of Mrv Louisa Hichter against the Supreme Lodge of the 
Knights of Pythias Judge Uahrs gave a verdict in favor 
of the plaintiff for $3,000. Among the grounds upon which 
the Knights of Pythias refused payment of the policy of 
Mr. Ricbter's life was that he was killed while a soldier 
fighting for his country. It is refreshing to know now 
that technicalities have been brushed aside and the widow 
will get the money. 

The National Board of Fire Underwriters has issued a 
circular to its members, in which there are some strong 
statements that will undoubtedly bring down on Presi- 
dent Irwin's head no small amount of criticism. The Nswa 
Letter, not having the pleasure of a personal acquaint- 
ance with Mr. Irwin, is at a loss to know whether to 
attribute the statements of the gentleman to pessimism 
or to bile. He says at the commencement: "The Ere in- 
surance business in this country is in a most deplorable 
condition, and is rapidly approaching a crisis which will 
severely test the resources of the strongest corporations; 
that by reason of our mistakes and our unwisely directed 
efforts we are menaced with the distrust of the public, 
and that in consequence of our antagonisms and conflicts, 
we are bringing upon ourselves most hostile and danger- 
ous legislation." Shades of Enery Evans! but there is 
worse and more of it. Speaking of the actions of the 
companies, he says: "A fierce strife for supremacy goes 
on, with the most reckless disregard of our obligations to 
the public, and to those who have placed us in positions of 
trust and responsibility." Still further he says: "We 
seem to be competing with each other in an effort to in- 
crease the expense of the business without making any 
earnest effort to increase our revenue to meet this in- 
creased expense." What a wicked lot of fellows those East- 
ern men must be to be guilty of all these charges. Now, 
if Mr. Irwin would come out here to the Coast and be en- 
tertained at dinner by our San Francisco Bohemian Fire 
Underwriters, and then sit down the next morning and 
re-write his circular, it would all be rosy; there would 
not be any crisis in the business, and it would all be plain 
sailing. But then Irwin lives in New York, poor fellow, 
and probably has dyspepsia. 

The magnitude of life insurance is shown by the fact that 
during the last two weeks of December the Mutual Life 
Insurance Company of New York paid out an average of 
over $91,000 per day in claims and endowments. Just 
think of it I Over thirty-three millions per annum I 

Davis and Watson have been appointed General Agents 
for California for the British America and the Western As- 
surance Companies, with W. B. Westlake as special agent. 
The California business will, be reported to Davis and 
Watson, and the two companies they represent will again 
become a factor in Pacific Coast underwriting. Agency 
business cannot be successfully done where the D.-Rs.. 
are sent, even as far as Denver, let alone Chicago. Fol- 
lowing this change it is reasonable to expect that some of 
the other companies may again decide to do business face 
to face instead of by the mails. 

Thomas H. Williams, who has been special for the Phoe- 
nix of Hartford, is now with J. B. F. Davis & Son, as spe- 
cial agent for the Sun for California, Oregon, Utah and 
Arizona. 

W. H. Hoagland, special agent of the Royal, resigned 
his position December 31st, '99. 

George E. Butler, of Butler & Halden, has returned 
from his southern trip. 

The next annual meeting of the Fire Underwriters' As- 
sociation of the Pacific, Ed Niles President, will be held 
! in San Francisco February 20th and 21st. The knapsack 
1 will not be the only thing opened at the annual dinner on 
\ the 21st. 



FIRC. MARINE. AND INLAND INSURANCE 

FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF 8AN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

Capital, $1 000.000 Assets, $3,500,000 



PALATINE 

DfSURANGB COMPANY Limited) OF mv.miimii: BHQLAHD 

SOLID SECURITY OVER $9.000 000 RESOURCES 

'life V. I VI.. N. Manager. 439 Onllfoniln Mraet, 8. F. 
PIIIF. INSll.-AM 1: 



Founded A. D. IT'.'J 



r. 



Insurance ^ompa 



ny of /North A 



merica 



Cleveland L. Dam, Attprney-at-Law. 503 California St. Tel. Main 3 13. 



OF I'Htl.AI.F.I.rniA. I'EN.V. 

Paid-up Capital $3,000,000 

Burplas to Policy Holders £5022.016 

JAMES r>, BAILEY, General Agent. 412 C alifornia street. S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated bj Royal Charter, A. D. 1720 

Capital Paid Up. t3.446.100 Assets. J24.034.110.35 

Surplus to Polios Holders. 80.612 455.96 

FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager 

501-503 Montgomery street, corner Sacramento 

FIRE. MARINE. AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Company 

of New Zealand 
Capital, $6,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Oflice in company's building, 312 California street 



Hooker & Lent. City Agents, 14 Post street 



W. P. THOMAS. Manager 



Phoenix Assurance Co., of London 

Established 1782 

Providence-Washington Insurance Company 

Incorporated 1799 



BUTLER & HALDAN General Agents 



413 California street, 8. F. 



Connecticut Fire Insurance Co 

OF HARTFORD 

Cash Capital 81,000,000.00 

1'awh Assets 3,869,451 7r> 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,068,889.71 

BENJAMIN .1. SMITH. Manager 
COLIN M. BOYD. San Francisco agent. 411 California street. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Go. 

(Limited) OF LIVERPOOL 

Capital '. 86.700.000 

BA LFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents 316 California street , 8. F . 

The Thuringia Insurance Company 

of ERFURT. GERMANY 
Capital, 82.250,000 Assets 810.984,218 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers 
Pacific CoaBt Department: 204-208 Sansome street, S. F. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany 
N. SOHLESINGER, City Agent 304 Montgomery Btreet San Francisco 

Western Mutual Investment Go. Tel - Main . 1682 

$2 Per Month 
•115-416 Safe Deposit Building, Montgomery and California streets, San 
Francisco. Agents Wanted. 



Southern Pacific Co.— Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are due to arrive at SAN FRANCI8CO: 
[Main Line. Foot of Market Street] 

leave] From December 15, 1899 [arrive 

*7:00a Benicia. Suiaun, Elmira, Vucswille, Rumsey, and Sacramento.. *7:45 p 

*7:00a Shasta Express— Davis, Willows, Red Bluff. Portland *7:45 P 

*7:30a Martinez, San Ramon, Valleio, Napa, Calistoga, Santa Rosa *6:15 p 

""8:30 A The Overland Limited— Offden. Denver, Omaha. Chicago *5:15 P 

*8:30 A San Jose, Livermore, Stockton, lone, Sacramento, Placerville, 

Maryaville. Chioo. Red Bluff. *4:15 p 

°8:30a "'Milton, Oakdale, and Sonora *4:15 p 

*9:00 A Hay wards, Niles, and way stations *11:45 A 

*9:00A Davis. Woodland, Knights Landing, Maryaville, Oroville. *7:46 p 

*9:00a Atlantic Express, Ogden and East *9:45 A 

*9:00 A Martinez, Tracy. Lathrop, Stockton, Merced and Fresno *12:15 p 

*9:00 A Port Costa, Fresno, Mojave and Los AngeleB *'6:45 p 

*1O:O0a Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations ^ii-AS p 

*11:00a Hay wards, Niles, and way stations *2:45 p 

*12:00 m Niles, Livermore. Stockton, Sacramento, Mendota, Hanford, 

Visalia.Porterville *4:15 P 

tl:00p Sacramento River Steamers t8:00 P 

*3:00p Haywards, Niles and way stations *5:45 p 

*4:0Op Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Calistoea, Santa Rosa *9:15 A 

*4:0Op Benicia, Vacaville, Sacramento, Woodland, Knight's Landing 

Marysville, Oroville *"10:45 A 

*4:30 p Niles. San Jose, and Stockton *7:15 P 

^SiOOp The Owl Limited. Tracy, Fresno, Bakersfleld, Saugus for 

Santa Barbara, Los Angeles *"10:45 A 

"5:00 p Sunset Limited— El Paso. New Orleans and East ("10:45 A 

*5:30 p Stockton, Merced, Fresno *12:15 p 

*5:30 p Fresno, Bakersfleld, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Deming, El 

Paso, New Orleans, and East *8:45 A 

*5:30p Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, for Mojave and East *6:45 P 

*(i:00 p Haywards. Niles, and San Jose *7:45 A 

t6:30p Vallejo *12:15 P 

*6:30p Oriental Mail— Ogden ami East *8:50 P 

J7:00p Valleio, Port Costa, and way stations J9:55 p 

*8:05p Oregon and California Express, Sacramento, Maryaville, Red- 
ding, Portland Puget Sound and East *8:15 A 

Coast Division (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

*8:15a Newark, Center ville, San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruzand way stations *5:50 P 

f2:15p Newark. Centerville, San Jose, New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations fl0:50 A 

*4:15p Newark, San Jose, Los Gatos *9:20 A 

611:45 p Hunters' Excursion, San Jose and way stations t7:20 p 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— *7:15, 9:00, and 11:00 
a. M., U :00, *2:00. J3 :00, *4 :00, t5 :00 and *6 :00 P. M. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway— ^6:00. 8:00. 10:00 A. m.; Jl2:00, *1:00 
t2:00, *8KM), 14:00, *5:00 P. M. 

Coast Division (Broad Gauge). (Third and Townaend streets). 

t6:10A Ocean View, South San Francisco f6:30 P 

*7:O0a San Jose and way stations (New Almaden Wednesday only) *1:30 p 

*9:00a San Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Paso Robles, 

San Luis Obispo, Surf, Lompoc, and principal way stations *4:10 p 

*10:40a San Jose and way stations *6:35 A 

"11:30a San Jose and way stations *5:30 p 

f2:45 p San Mateo, Redwood. Menlo Park, Palo Alto, Santa Clara, San 
Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, and Pacific 
Grove tl0:36 A 

!3:30p San Jose and Way Stations *7:30 p 
4:15 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations *9:45 A 
5:0Op San Jose and Principal Way Stations t9:00 A 
5:30 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations *8:35 A 

*6:30p San Jose and Way Stations t«:00 A 

611:45p San Jose and Way Stations "7;W p 

A for Morning. p for Afternoon. * Daily. t Sundays excepted. 

t Sundays only. f> Saturdays only. 

a Tuesdays and Fridays. c Thursdays and Sundays. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and other 
information. 

Pacific Coast Steamship Co. m s S m s ™ta£°' 4, * i ' ! ' 

For Alaskan ports, 10 A. M. Jan. 1.6,11, 16, 21, 26, 31 : Feb. 5 
change to company's steamers at Seattle. 

For B. C. and Puget Sound Porta, 10 A. m., Jan. 1, 6, 11, 16, 
21, 26, 31 : Feb. 5, and every fifth day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay) 2 p.m., Jan. 4,9,14,19,24, 
29; Feb. 3. and every fifth day thereafter. 
For Newport (Los Angeles) and way porta, 9 A. M. Jan. 
3, 7.11,15.19,23, 27, 31; Feb. 4, and every fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, Santa Barbara, Port Los 
Angeles, Redondo, (Los Angeles) 11 A. M„ Jan. 1, 5, 9, 13, 17, 21, 25, 29; Feb. 2. 
and every fourth day thereafter. 
For Mexican ports, 10 a m., 7th of each month. 
For further information obtain company's folder. 

The company reserves the right to change steamers, sailing datea, and 
hours of sailing without previous notice. 

TICKET OFFICE— No. 4 New Montgomery atreet. (Palace Hotel.) 

G00DALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen.Agts., 10 Market St., San Franciaco 

SS " Muana," Wednesday. Jan. 24, at 8 p. m. 
SS " Australia." Wednesday. Feb. 7. 1900, 2 p. m. 
Line to Coolgardie, Australia, and Capetown, South 
Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS CO 
Agents, 114 Montgomery St. Freight office, 327 
Market St.. San Francisco. 




EANIC 







Weak Men and Women 



Should use Damlana Bitters, 
the great Mexican remedy; 

it gives health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 323 Market 

street San Franoisoo. Send for circular. 



California Northwestern R'y Co. 

LESSEE 

San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tiburon Ferry— Foot of Market Street 

WEEK DAYS— 7:30,9:00, 11:00 a. m; 12:35, 3:30, 5:10. 6:30 P. m. Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11 :30 p. m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :50 and 11 :30 p. M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00,9:30, 11:00 a. m.; 1:30, 3:30, 5:00, 6:20 p. m. 

SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 

WEEK DAYS— 6:10,7:50.9:20,11:10 A. M.; 12:45, 3:40, 5:10 P. M. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1 :55 and 6:35 p. M. 

SUNDAYS— 8:10. 9:40, 11:10 A. h.;1:40. 3:40, 5:05, 6:25 P. m. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave San Francisco 



Week days | Sundays 



In Effect Oct. 15, 1899 



Destinations 



7:30 AM 
3:30 pm 
5:10 pm 



8:00 AM 
9:30 AM 
5:00 PM 



Novato 
Petal uma 
Santa Rosa 



Arrive in San Francisco 
Sundays | "Week da ys 



10:40 AM 
6:05 pm 
7:35 pm 



8:40 AM 
10:25 AM 
6:22 pm 



7:30 AM 
3:30 pm 



Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdsburg, Lytton, 

Geyserville, Cloverdale 



10:25 am 
6:22 pm 



7:30 am 


8:00 am 1 


Hopland, Ukiah 


1 7:35 pm 


| 6:22 pm 


7:30 am 1 
3;30 pm I 


8:00 AM 1 


Guerneville 


! 7:35 pm 


1 10:25 am 
1 6:22 pm 


7:30 am I 
5:10 pm 1 


8:00 AM 1 
5:00 pm ] 


Sonoma 
Glen Ellen 


1 10:40 am 
I 6:05 pm 


I 8:40 am 
1 6:22 pm 


7:30 AM 1 
3:30 pm | 


8:00 ah 1 
5:00 PM I 


Sebastopol 


1 10:40 AM 
I 7:35 pm 


1 .10:25 AM 
1 6:22 pm 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs and White Sulphur 
Springs: at Lytton for Lytton Springs; at Geyserville for Skaggs' Spring* ; ut 
Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for Duncan Springs, Highland Springs 
Kelseyville, Carlsbad Springs, Soda Bay, Lakeport, and Bartlett Springs ; at 
Ukiah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake, 
Witter Springs, Upper Lake, Porno, Potter Valley, John Day's, Riverside, 
Lierley's, Bucknell's, Sanhedrin Heights, Hullville, Booneville, Philo, 
Christine Soda Springs, Navarro, Whitesboro, Albion, Little River, Orr's 
Springs, Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, "Westport, Usal Willi ts, Laytonville, 
Cummings, Bell's Springs, Harris, Olsen's, Dyer, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 
TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St.. Chronicle Building. 



H. C. WHITING. Gen. Manager. 



R. X. RYAN. Gen. Pass. Agent. 



CALIFORNIA LIMITED 

The fastest train running over the 
best railroad, with the highest class 
accommodations. Connecting train 
leaves San Francisco at 5 p. m. . . . 

Monday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, 

Arriving in Chicago at 2:15 p. m. 

Friday, Sunday, Tuesday, Wednesday. 

Overland Express 

Every day in the year. Pullman Palace and 
Upholstered Tourist Cars leave for Denver, 
Kansas City, Chicago, and the East. Take 
Market street ferry at 5.30 p. m. 



Santa Fe 

Route 



Valley Road 



Between Stockton, Fresno, Hanford, Visalia 
Tulare and Bakerafield, furnishes good loea, 
train service. 

San Francisco Office: 628 Market street; telephone Main 1531. 

Oakland Office: 1118 Broadway. 

Jno. L. Teuslow, General Agent Passenger Department. San Francisco. 

Jno. J. Byrne, General Passenger Agent, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIKST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p. m., for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG, 

calling at Kobe (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hongkong 
with steamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Doric (via Honolulu) Thursday, February 1, 1900 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Tuesday, February 27, 1900 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Friday, March 23,1900 

Doric (via Honolulu) Tuesday, April 17, 1900 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or pasaage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street 
corner First. D. D. STUBBS, General Manager. 

Oregon Short Line 

Only two days to Butte. 
Shortest line to Utah, 
Idaho and Montana Points. 

D. W. HITCHCOCK, General Agent, 
1 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 



/Y*-» ,*r an ■ •»■.:> 




eBTABLIOMeo WV/LT 30. 18S6 



(*-.• ,i MhtI Mm, It 




■TER 




Ko/. z.r 



5>4iV FRANCISCO, JANUARY 20, 1900. 



Number 3. 



Printed and published every Saturday by the proprietor. FRED MAItltlOTT 
Kearny Mrcet. San Krahi l*co. Entered At San PlBI 
office as Seeond-claas Mutter. 
■be otn of the NKVYH LETTER In Hew York i iiv in at xi\ l-ark Row 

Bkli;.. Frr.l V.Marriott KaMom ReprefjeMeirve). where Inlorinuti.-n 
may tic obtained rctrardiiik' Sllbaoriptlon end loh ertixinc rut.-. 
All social Item*, announcement*, advertising;, or other matter. Intended for 
publication In the current number of tiu- NBW8 LBTTRB, should be 
sent to ihi« offlee n"t later than six o'elock Thursday itfif noon. 

THE highbinder may not be so tiresome as the spell- 
binder, but he is more fatal. 

IT is evident that the Police Commissioners are not to be 
permitted to suffer from lack of advice. 



HE most ardent expansionist has as yet been unable 
to frame an excuse for the expanding bullet. 



T 

GENERAL OTIS must smile grimly as he reads the 
abuse heaped upon various generals in South Africa. 

DR. LAWLER is so accustomed to holding public 
office that the absence of the privilege naturally 
strikes him as a crime. 



FERHAPS Senator Hoar was impelled to introduce a 
bill for the protection of birds by the belief that the 
Filipino is a bird. 

DESIGNS for converting the Calaveras grove into lum- 
ber demonstrate the brutality of the commercial in- 
stinct. 

THE mortuary record of the fiercest battle in Africa 
would not have made material difference in the re- 
port of a Gettysburg. 

WHEN the Call and the Bulletin get near enough 
together to bark up the same tree, there is likely to 
be a scrimmage at the foot of the tree. 

SINCE the police board has scattered the inmates of 
the Nymphia, the health board will be obliged to turn 
loose the inmates of the pest house or take a back seat in 
the temple of reform^ 

VARIOUS fines imposed upon ships at Astoria amount- 
ing to $10,500 have been reduced by the Federal 
authorities to $75.05, and yet doubtless the shippers are 
kicking about that extra nickel. 

LET the intrepid journalists of San Francisco pause be- 
fore protesting in the matter of the wide open Ken- 
tucky feud. We have troubles of our own in Chinatown 
that are yet with us. 

OOM Paul must be getting uneasy at the unexpected 
prolongation of the war. He has found it necessary 
to again remind his faithful burghers that he has an ex- 
clusive cinch on Providence. 



SS the fights and rumors of fights continue to emanate 
from the City Hall, it is refreshing to note that only 
a few times in the course of a man's natural life a reform 
charter goes into force. 

OF an ex-policeman who shot and killed a saloon keeper 
at the Mission the other day, a local paper says that 
he was born in Ireland and appointed to the San Fran- 
cisco police force when he was fourteen years of age. 
This must surely be a mistake. To be born in Ireland 
used to be an implied requirement for admission to the 
San Francisco force, but it is not true that children, even 
of Irish birth, were given stars. 



THE library spirit is stronger than ever in Andrew 
Carnegie when he will spend in cable tolls $4,000 of 
his blow-hole armor plate wealth to add a Hoar speech to 
Aguinaldo's collection of literary curiosities. 

GEORGIANS have been threatening to lynch an emi- 
grant agent who has been taking negroes out of the 
State. Georgians feel entirely competent to dispose of 
such niggers as may be deemed superfluous. 

THE booming of French cannon is heard on the coast 
of China. France has at last commenced to do her 
share in the general benevolent assimilation which is char- 
acterizing the last days of the nineteenth century. 

HAVING discovered a curious stone, which fell from the 
skies in Sonoma county, the Examiner inquires anx- 
iously whether it is an aerolite or a meteor. Perhaps one 
of the clever young men on the paper will define the differ- 
ence between the two. 



THE late Superintendent of Streets is charged with 
having conducted a particularly rotten department. 
Specifications do not seem to be lacking, but the absence 
of an ardent desire to controvert them has been remarked. 
There are courts and columns open to Mr. Fragley. 

IN publishing a set of lynching statistics to show that 
this popular Southern pastime is not so popular as it 
used to be, the Call scorns to take notice of the fact that 
the "nigger" is not as plentiful as he used to be. With- 
out a close season lynching in the South promises soon to 
become one of the lost sports. 

OAKLAND will bar from the schoois teachers and 
pupils afflicted with tuberculosis. The plan is a wise 
one. A consumptive child is a source of danger to com- 
rades, and in being confined to a crowded room and study, 
is the victim of cruelty. Let both the sick and the well 
have a chance. 



THE hot-mouthed, long distance "Boer sympathizers" 
of San Francisco, who rear upon their hind limbs in 
public places to compare Kruger to Washington and his 
followers to the American Revolutionists, are reminded 
that the South African Boer is fighting against, not for 
liberty and equal rights to all men. 

JULIAN Ralph's account of aristocratic Boers going to 
battle in carriages, and retiring from the field in the 
same way, leaving their vassals to cover their retreat, 
does not tally very well with the stories of the sterling 
qualities of the Boer character, as dished up to us each 
day by the yellow daily press, nor with the results of the 
war up to date. 

REV. W. J. Wilbur Chapman and Will H. Moody are 
engaged in a quarrel over the question as to who 
shall write the biography of the late Evangelist Moody. 
Bad names are being passed, and the Rev. Chapman has 
resigned the vice-presidency of the Moody Institute be- 
cause of the trouble — an eloquent examr'e of the amount 
of brotherly love existing in Moodyized Curistianity. 

ft GENTLEMANLY .correspondent of a local paper 
throws a patriotic fit over the plan to give Alaska 
military rule. As there is no such plan, his pain, however 
picturesque, is wasted. To provide Alaska with enough 
soldiers to afford necessary police protection along. the 
somewhat uncertain boundary line is the extent of the 
scheme, and the wickedness of this is not apparent. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 20, 1900. 



THE MAYOR AND THE PRESS. 

OUR Mayor, James D. Phelan, is a game man. It takes 
a game man to stand up at a public banquet and say 
that "the power of the press is insignificant so far as 
anything political is concerned,'" that its "importance is 
high only in billingsgate." When a man is a politician 
and apparently on an easy road to important statesman- 
ship, he must indeed be game to utter words that in most 
cases would be nothing short of political suicide. Not even 
the mentioning, without calling by name, of "one paper in 
the city that has been the friend of the charter," takes 
away from the bravery of Mr. Phelan's speech. To all 
intents and purposes his speech was a deliberate fearless 
attack on the daily journalism of San Francisco, and one 
that was warranted. We have here the most reckless, 
irresponsible press of any city of the same size in the 
world. Good newspaper men are employed by the San 
Francisco publishers; good prices are paid for their work; 
the circulations of the three morning dailies are largely 
out of proportion to the size of the city. Everybody seems 
to read the newspapers. And yet, as Mr. Phelan says, 
they are without influence. And why is this? Well, there 
are no editors in the first place, and there are no ideals, 
no standards, in the second. The day of the editor has 
departed, so far as the daily press of San Francisco is 
concerned. The three big papers are owned by million- 
aires, and regarded by them as mere pieces of business 
property or else as weapons with which to fight each other 
or outside enemies, and make or break public men, from 
mayors to poundmasters. There is no reliability, no re- 
sponsibility to these journals. There was a time when 
their misstatements were called down by their weekly con- 
temporaries and by "Old Subscriber" and "Veritas," but 
that time has passed. Now the grossest fabrication may 
be printed as fact in the obscenest of black type, and there 
is none so concerned as to contest the matter. The daily 
press is not taken seriously in San Francisco. There was 
a day when it had dignity, integrity, and was the honest 
servant of the people. It gave the news, it gave keeu, 
honest editorials on the affairs of the day, unscarred by 
petty prejudices. Then its pages were fewer, its circula- 
tion smaller, but it was a real power in the land. Now it 
is nothing more than an advertising sheet. Its editorial 
voice is stilled. The only way it can attract attention 
even to an important subject is by playing the matter up 
in the news columns in circus type. The editorial writer is 
dead. Every item of news is its own editorial according 
to the whim or so-called policy of the millionaire owner 
and his man in charge. Prize-fights are glorified, adul- 
teries salaciously celebrated, scandals thrown in the nose 
of the public. Real news that concerns the real affairs 
of the world, the real history of the day, the stuff from 
which to-morrow's book of history must be made — all this 
is ignored or else basely, clownishly exaggerated. The 
cheap actress who pulls a colleague's hair will receive 
more attention than an amendment to the Constitution of 
the United States. We used to have Police Gazettes to 
handle such things, but they have been crowded out of 
sight and sound. And so it comes that one of the noblest 
institutions of a free country has been turned into a ridicu- 
lous, vulgar insult to civilization and good taste. Mr. 
Phelan has taken the bull by the horns, and his attitude 
is important, not so much for its originality as for his high 
position in public office and the organized newspaper fight 
that will now be made to down him. But evidently he 
feels that he can be indspendent of the papers. They 
have shouted so long at the top of their voices that the 
people really don't pause to listen any longer. 



TO BOOM CALIFORNIA'S COMMERCE AS NEVER BEFORE. 

WHATEVER else may be said about our occupation of 
the Philippine Islands, it is certain that it is the be- 
ginning of a great boom in the commerce of the Pacific. 
It has drawn the attention of the commercial world to the 
possibilities of the vast ocean that confronts us. If an 
"open door" is to be maintained in the Orient, it is seen 
that the States situated on the Pacific shores of America 
must be the largest beneficiaries of the new order of things. 
New and almost illimitable markets will be opened to our 
trade and commerce. China, Japan, the Philippines 
Australia, New Zealand, South and Central America' 



Hawaii, and Alaska lie within the sphere of our commer- 
cial activities. They would constitute markets enough for 
us, even though we were cut off from intercourse with our 
Eastern States and Europe. They contain about one half 
the population of the entire globe. In the relations that 
we may succeed in building up with these varied popula- 
tions, our future prosperity and greatness will depend. 
Do our business men, merchants and bankers adequately 
realize that fact? We trust they do, but would like to 
witness more active evidences all around us that tbey are 
awake to their opportunities. The placid waters of the 
mild Pacific have hitherto been too little disturbed. They 
need to be whitened by the sails of our merchantmen, and 
lashed into foam by our twenty-knots-an-hour steamers. 
It looks as if Congress is about to pass the ship subsidy 
bill, intended to revive our merchant marine. It is a bold 
measure. It calls for the payment of vast subsidies to 
ship owners. Its enemies call it a "job," and perhaps it 
is, but so have our tariffs been, but that did not prevent 
manufacturers taking advantage of them and prospering 
exceedingly. The passage of that bill will mean a great 
deal to the Commerce of the Pacific. But with or without 
government subventions, we must have newer and better 
vessels on this ocean. Fast steam lines are the commerce 
winners of the keen competitive days that are now upon 
us. We are now largely depending and for some time 
must continue to depend upon English tramp steamers. 
But that condition must not long be submitted to. We 
want steamers equal to the best, and we want them to be 
owned and operated from San Francisco. This should be 
the home port for most of the vessels that trade from it. 
There is money in supplies, repairs, wages, and charter 
money. Besides, ships are tools of trade that struld be in 
the hands of home workmen. The outlook is that the 
Nicaragua Canal bill will pass. We are not of those who 
believe that the construction of that waterway will bene- 
fit California. It will give to the East a short cut to all 
the South Pacific countries, to deprive California of her 
main advantage as a Central Pacific port. The measure 
should receive no support from this coast. Better, far 
better, so far as this State is concerned, to erect an im- 
passable barrier across the isthmus of Darien. But the 
Canal will take many years to build, anyhow. Meanwhile, 
California must get firmly intrenched in the countries 
around her. 

THE COCKTAIL ROUTE. 

IT was we believe, the famous historian, Froude, who, 
when asked what was the best thing he had discovered 
in California, answered "the cocktail." This seductive 
admixture of spirits, bitters, oil of lime and ice was in- 
vented and named in California. San Francisco was the 
first to have the cocktail, the first to name its line of 
popular saloons the cocktail route; and San Francisco has 
a lot to answer for. Out of a simple, fascinating drink we 
have made what may be termed without extravagance a 
national vice — the vice of drinking before, instead of with 
or after our meals; the pernicious habit of walking "the 
line" from saloon to saloon and with artificial sociability 
working up an artificial appetite. In its easy insinuating 
way the cocktail habit — by which term we mean the drink- 
ing of mixed and unmixed spirits before meals — bids fair 
to demoralize the backbone and stomach of the country. 
The cocktail route is a greater menace to San Francisco 
than is Chinatown. For it works its evil among the best 
classes in the community. Business men, professional 
men, gamblers and idlers are alike the victims of its spell. 
In a cafe or in a club men gather, and, incidentally, drink. 
But the drinking is incidental. In a club or in a cafe the 
members and patrons are seated, they talk, they smoke 
or drink as little or as much as they desire— but they are 
not there for the sole purpose of drinking, and the 
"reciprocity" crime of every bodys treating is not thought 
of. In a saloon men flock only to drink. The waistcoat 
of the average man about town is prematurely shiny from 
rubbing against the bar rail. You have uo business stand- 
ing up against a bar unless you keep the barkeeper and the 
cash register busy. Drinks are handed out as any other 
merchandise; a bar will accommodate only a limited number 
of persons, and lounging at it is not eucouraged. It is not 
barroom etiquette to lounge, any more than it is to order 
drinks without first depositing your money on the polished 



January ro, 1900. 






mahogany. Barroom etiquette is a strong in flue 1 

■ that none seems too poor to Ho it r. 
Is why when one of apart-. llanos the di 

other five make it a point of honor I 
spot. That is why men drink before dinner, di 
spirits that leave them with little or no palate (or the 
finer flavors of wine. That is why there is so much 
drunkennr- not refer to the occasional debauch, 
but to the regular afternoon jag of the genteel kind. 
Day in and day out it is the same old round of liquor along 
the cocktail route. Some meo stand it and pickle to a 
rosy old age; others get to love drink for drink's sake alone 
and flop by the wayside. We are not talking morality or 
temperance, but just plain common sense. The American, 
the San Franciscan especially, is the most foolisb, 
inartistic drinker on earth. He does not know how to 
use the liquid delights of life. He is a hog. Here we are 
living in a country of wine; year by year our vintages have 
improved until already California can take her place 
among the famous wine producing places of the world — 
and how manv Californians know the first thing about 
good wine? Too few, too few. We drink whisky, whisky, 
whisky, and at the wrong time. And all on account of the 
cocktail route. 

CAPTAIN LEARY GOVERNING GUAM. 

THAT sturdy old naval officer, Captain Leary, is mak- 
ing his mark in governing Guam. He appears to be 
a sort of Robinson Crusoe, or a Sancho Panza ruling his 
island. Some of his orders regulating agriculture and 
social life have a distinctly comic flavor. His decree 
abolishing slavery, even in the mild form of peonage, is no 
joke. He holds that it cannot exist where the American 
constitution is paramount. He has further decreed that 
the natives, instead of keeping twenty-nine feast and fast 
days every month, must work on their lands on every day 
of the week except Sunday, and that he will proclaim 
from time to time what holidays they are to keep. He 
began by declaring Thanksgiving Day a time on which 
they must cease from their labors, give thanks to Al- 
mighty God for the blessings of free government which he 
had given them, and, that duty done, they were to feast 
and make merry. He himself and his officers led the way. 
In the morning they attended church, and in the after- 
noon they had all the people out of doors, where presents 
were made to the children, and music, dancing, and games 
of various kinds indulged in. What is described as "the 
gayest time ever known in Guam" was had. The old sea 
dog is reported as enjoying his task amazingly, and never 
tiring of setting his people examples that he thinks they 
will do well to follow. It would be worth while to know 
what is thought of all this in Washington. After defend- 
ing the toleration of slavery in the Sulus, you cannot sud- 
denly rise up and bless an American Governor who breaks 
out in noble indignation at the spectacle of slavery under 
the United States flag, and boldly declares it in violation 
of the United States Constitution. If Governor Leary is 
right, General Otis and President McKinley are wrong; 
if they are correct in their view of the legal right of 
slavery to exist under our flag in the Sulus, then he is all 
at sea in maintaining that it has no such right in Guam. 
But the opinion of the American people on this subject is 
in no manner of doubt. They abhor the treaty made with 
the Sultan, recognizing slavery and polygamy. Any pub- 
lic man who supports it will be repudiated at the polls in 
November next. Governor Leary deserves to be applauded 
for his act. He would receive more credit for it, 
however, if it did not so sadly reflect upon what has been 
done elsewhere. 

KRUGER'S REBUFF TO THE UNITED STATES. 

THE old Boer leader has just been guilty of a very 
boorish act towards the United States. Mr. Hollis, 
our Consular representative at Pretoria, has been notified 
by the Transvaal authorities that he will not be allowed 
to act as an intermediary between them and the British. 
The only reason assigned for this restriction of his Con- 
sular privileges is that the Boers do not want any British 
representatives in their territory during the present con- 
flict. The Government at Washington has been notified 
to this effect, and upon its action will depend the status of 
our future relations with the Transvaal. Happily there 
is little likelihood that this ungracious act on the part of 



Kruger will be repaid in kind by the We 

;i, whose good faith, 
as well as that of IbJ Impugned. 

But that would l< 

uncaredfor, andnodm. uner- 

ican residents there. 1 tber likely, therefore, that 

> rnent will 1 (ha firm and dii/ni- 

fied protest, and trust to the returning sense of t h. 
authorities to make such amends hereafter as may be 
within their power. The attitude of the Boers in 'this 
matter is a broad violation of civilize.l custom and prece- 
dent. Neutral representation of an enemy's interests in 
time of war has, after long usage, become almost a prin- 
ciple of international law. It is invariably respected by 
great nations, and has been so generally recognized dur- 
ing modern wars that its virtual nullification by the action 
of the Transvaal cannot have been taken in ignorance but 
appears to be a studied defiance of the customs of civiliza- 
tion. It places us in an awkward position towards Great 
Britain. We called upon that power, during our war 
with Spain, to represent the United States in both Cuba and 
the Philippines, and it is one of the pleasurable memories 
of that period that we could not have been better repre- 
sented if our own Consuls had been on the spot. England 
will probablj' not remind us of our reciprocal obligations; 
but, if she did, it is hard to see what satisfactory answer 
could be made. Perhaps we owe it no less to ourselves 
than to her to cling fast to principle and precedent, up- 
holding with dignity our position as a progressive member 
of the family of nations. 



NO CHARTERS GIVEN AWAY IN CUBA. 

ftMERICAN speculators in Cuba are stirring up the 
natives to petition for the repeal of what is known as 
the "Foraker Amendment," which prohibits the granting 
of any charters, or franchises, in the island while it con- 
tinues under our military government. In one of the 
petitions Cnngress is reminded that every State in the 
American Union has upon its statute book a law permit- 
ting franchises to be taken by persons needing them, by 
simply filing a schedule with the names, purposes, and 
amount of capital stock of the incorporators. Yet, it is 
urged, that Cuba, just emerging from centuries of Spanish 
oppression, cannot get a charter for a mortgage bank to 
lend her farmers the capital to replant their cane fields. 
This, for the time being, may be a hardship, but it must 
be borne with for the present. If Cuba were thrown 
open to all the Trusts and Combines, there would be little 
of it left for its people. It is to be hoped that the Cubans 
will learn a lesson from Uncle Sam's protection of them in 
this respect. When they come into their own, they should 
guard it as a sacred possession, and not grant it away to 
foreign holders of mortgages, franchises and charters. 
The Congress of the United States never did a more con- 
siderate or honest thing than when it adopted the Amend- 
ment which has saved Cuba for the Cubans. The Native 
newspapers published on the island which favor an inde- 
pendent government, are strongly opposed to the repeal 
of the "Foraker Amendment." La Discusion, for instance, 
urgently insists that no charters should be granted in 
Cuba "except by a government or entity freely chosen by 
the Cuban people." It argues that "if franchises are 
granted by the military governor, there will be a rush of 
the capitalist and speculating class to the United States 
authorities, and gradually the feeling of independence, 
and the desire for it, will be sapped, and the resistancet _ 
it will be lessened in both countries." The argument of. 
our Cuban contemporary is eminently sound, but it is not 
a good one to address to the covetous minds of many of 
our countrymen. Anything that will tend to promote an- 
nexation will be likely to find favor in Washington, where 
the pledge to "leave the government to the free will of its 
people" is bitterly regretted. If that will can be bought, 
or cajoled into voting for annexation our policy of expan- 
sion will be complete. 

SENATOR Pettigrew has introduced a measure giv- 
ing the right of suffrage to women, but so framed as 
to include the women of Hawaii, Porto Rico and the Phil- 
ippines. While the Senator is himself more or less of a 
joke, it will be interesting to note whether the good 
ladies who induced him to champion their cause will ac- 
cept his dignified effort to make monkeys of them. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 20, 1900. 



POLICE MANAGEMENT. 

BELIEVING that the new Police Commission is made 
of good citizens intent upon carrying out their pledge 
to give the department "a thorough renovating," the 
News Lettee proceeds with its policy of suggesting where 
the renovating should begin. With all respect for the gen- 
tlemen who constitute the commission, they are men of 
active business life, who cannot be expected to know as 
much as trained journalists of the inner workings of a 
secret and corrupt department. We believe that we best 
serve the commission and promote the public weal when 
we mark the dangerous places with warning signals. If 
the commissioners are — as we have confidence that they 
will be — faithful to their trust, they will be thankful for 
light from all quarters. For our own part we thiDk it 
good journalism to labor to avert the making of mistakes, 
rather than to lie in wait for their occurrence, eager to 
pounce down upon them with that brilliancy of criticism 
of which our dailies are such masters. In previous num- 
bers we have pointed out the necessity of regulating the 
giving of the police news to all the newspapers alike. The 
police should be allowed no option in that matter. They 
are the real news gatherers of the city. What they 
gather is public property. They can so dispose of it as 
to make certain dailies their subservient tools, and the 
apologists of police rottenness and corruption of every 
kind. Hereafter, if it be seen that one newspaper has got 
an important "scoop" in an item of police news, let the 
commissioners seek until they find the officer who gave 
that item out, and then see that his dismissal is only a 
question of a few hours. Let us have a free press, to the 
end that there may be just criticism and a police force 
that shall be the servants of the public and not its mas- 
ters. What the city has suffered in the past from this 
cause may never be told. What wrongs individuals have 
endured are beyond telling. No such evils must be re- 
vived. They will not be submitted to a second time. 

The News Lettee esteems the plundering of Chinatown 
to be the second greatest evil practiced for many long 
years past by the police department, which has had many 
sources of illicit revenue, but none so fertile or so sure as 
that furnished by the Chinese. A race accustomed in their 
own country to pay for immunity from official harass- 
ments, they have been bled in this country at every pore, 
and at this very moment are subject to exactions that if 
imposed upon them in China would cause the most power- 
ful of mandarins to lose his head. Bad as it is, shocking 
as it is, when the example is set by peace officers, steal- 
ing from others is not in itself the worst of the evil. It 
is the mischievous uses to which the stolen money is often- 
times put. Some years ago it was proven to the satisfac- 
tion of a majority of a grand jury that a large sum of 
money was raised in Chinatown to affect a court decision 
which rendered the Police Commission perpetual. The 
white gamblers at the same time, and for the same 
purpose, were assessed ten per cent, on their month's 
winnings. The examples of this sort of thing might be 
multiplied almost indefinitely. But enough has been said 
to indicate what we mean. Give the police a weapon with 
which to control a daily or two, and permit them to rake 
in the shekels derivable from the vices and crimes of China- 
town, and then, as we have seen, you constitute a power 
that may prove a shelter to evil doing and a terror only 
to honest men. When the police commission "renovates" 
the head office and surrounds itself with men in whom it 
can have confidence, the first step will be taken towards 
curing the evils of Chinatown. 

The close contiguity and association of the police with 
the lewd women of the town, and the heavy assessments 
levied upon the poor fallen creatures, constitute a shame 
and a disgrace unspeakable. It is a delicate subject to 
handle, and we propose to touch it only lightly. The 
police commissioners, however, may not escape their obli- 
gations so easily. They knew when they accepted office 
what would be expected of them in that connection. That 
the department has battened and fattened upon the wages 
of sin for many years has been a matter of public noto- 
riety. The commissioners must have known that fact, 
and knowing it, must have taken office with the intention 
of dealing with it. It will not do to drive this evil from 
back streets to front ones, nor to make a second condition 
worse than the first. Let the commissioners know their 



own mind and follow it. Let them isolate the evil to such 
part of the city as may seem best, and outside of that 
area let it be rooted out as far as practicable. Above all 
things, prevent the police living upon its earnings, and 
from undue association with it. To isolate and tolerate 
an evil is not to approve it. To put it out of the sight 
and mind of those who do not go in search of it, is the best 
any great city has yet been able to accomplish. 

AUSTRALIA'S LOYALTY. 

ONE of the most striking personalities in Australia, 
J. F. Archibald, the founder, editor, and part pro- 
prietor of the Sydney Bulletin is now sojourning in San 
Francisco. And being here Archibald, who is not the 
man to hide his light under a bushel, has taken advantage 
of the opportunity to air his views on the Australian atti- 
tude towards England's little war in the Transvaal. With 
a unanimity which savored almost of pre-arrangement, the 
three morning papers, last Saturday, published an interview 
with this gentleman, in which he was made to say that 
the conflict with the Boers did not meet with Australian 
approval. We have no doubt that Mr. Archibald did say 
this thing, it is exactly what one would have expected of 
him, and he would unhesitatingly print the same statements 
in the columns of his own organ, the Sydney Bulletin. 
Where the local papers make the mistake is in assuming 
that the voice of Archibald is the voice of Australia. He 
has been described as the journalistic genius of Australia, 
and there is some truth in the assertion, for, almost un- 
aided, he has built up the Sydney Bulletin until it has be- 
come the most popular weekly in the Colonies. The wit of 
its paragraphs, the spicy humor of its social items, the 
brilliancy of its cartoons, have all combined to raise the 
paper to a unique position. Yet for all this it wields no 
political influence, as recent events have shown. Readers 
simply skip its long and somewhat heavy editorials, and 
devote themselves to the more interesting portions of the 
paper. On the subject of Imperialism Archibald is a 
crank of the most violent anti-British type. Year in and 
year out, ever since the Bulletin was started, he has 
never ceased in his abuse of the mother country, whose 
fostering care has rendered a United Australia possible. 
And as long as peace prevailed, the good natured, easy- 
going Australians were content to let him go his own way, 
satisfied with the amusement which the lighter columns of 
the journal afforded them. To-day we have changed all 
this, the war fever is in the air, and Australia, to a man, 
has volunteered to fight for the mother country. Already 
several thousand troops have been dispatched by the 
Colonies to the Cape, and thousands more are forthcoming 
should there be need for their services. The warlike 
enthusiasm in Sydney, in Melbourne, in Brisbane, has 
never been equalled since white man first set foot in this 
Southern land, and yet Archibald tells us that the great 
heart of Australia is not with the mother country in her 
hour of trial. Like Stead in England, he has got 
thoroughly out of touch with his public, and would have us 
believe that his own views, or the views which he expresses 
in his paper, are those of the Australian public. 
Fortunately actions speak more strongly than words, and 
the gallantry with which Australia has rushed to arms 
supplies whatever answer may be needed to Mr. Archi- 
bald's belittling criticism. 

TWO editors at Denver have been shot in a row grow- 
ing out of their efforts to secure the pardon of Alfred 
Packer, "the man-eater." They deserved all they got, 
and should promptly be fed to the gentleman in question. 
Packer killed six traveling companions years ago, and 
dined upon their persons, much to the displeasure of the 
community. The only reason he was not hanged was that 
while the diet padded his ribs, contemplation of it, or re- 
gret that he could not get more, unsettled his reason. 
Now he is supposed to be sane, but a similar supposition 
would hardly be applied to the case of the wounded 
editors. 

To Cure La Grippe in Two Days. 
Take Laxative Bromo Quinine Tablets. All druggists refund the 
money if it fails to cure. E. W. Grove's signature is on each box. 25c. 

Fob a good luncheon, dinner, or breakfast go to the Maison Richc, 
at the corner of Grant avenue and Geary street, where the chefs, 
waiters, wines, and napery are the finest to be had. Real French 
cooking at the Riche. 



January jo, 1900 



s \"«' 1 1.1 II IK 




THOSE of our pretty tfirls who have gone far afield 
this winter in search of pastures new, and fresh 
material for their fascinations must feel rather disgusted 
when their letters from home convey the intelligence of 
each newly announced engagement among their girl 
friends, for never in the history of our Swim has Hymen 
been so busy as this winter. \Vhen Walter Hobart and 
George Pope were respectively victims at matrimony's 
shrine they were the one match of their special season, 
but this year we have no less than five good matches to 
chronicle, with others of lesser note, and if rumor may be 
relied upon there are others to follow, notably one which 
cannot be more than hinted at just now, but which will 
be an eye opener to those who are not dreaming of such a 
capture. 

* • * 

What a close corporation the families of the Haggin- 
Tevis combine are, to be sure. This was the remark of 
an old-time Californian now domiciled in New York. Every 
one on this Coast knows how close the business relations 
of the financial magnate brothers-in-law — J. B. Haggin 
and Lloyd Tevis — were, but in the social world the families 
of each keep it up. Thus we hear of the introduction to 
Gotham's wealthy set of the Kentucky belle, Miss Armis- 
doo, under the wing of her beautiful sister, the niece-bride 
of J. B. Haggin; and of the coterie of cousins formed by 
the Lounsberry (nee Haggin), Pestetics, and Ben Ali Hag- 
gin's daughter, all clustered in New York and keeping well 
together, bearing in mind no doubt the favorite aphorism 
of Messrs. Haggin and Tavis in this city, "in union there 
is strength." 

* » # 

The complaint that the beaux of the dancing clubs are 
mostly boys does not seem to be confined to San Francisco, 
for recently arrived people from the East declare that 
New York women are growling over the fact that men — 
club-men — will not go to dances any more, and so women 
are compelled to accept the attentions of boys. It is 
pretty hard, surely, for the girl who has passed into the 
woman-of-experience stage to be obliged to smile and do 
the civil to the callow youth of the period, whose idea of 
mannishness is largely composed of swagger and familiar- 
ity. 

# # * 

It used to be that whenever the days hung heavily upon 
the hands of the women in the swim our genial friend, 
Greer Harrison, would resuscitate their drooping spirits 
with luncheons or dainty dinners in the Red Room of the 
Bohemian Club, so no wonder he speedily became "the 
dearest man"; but of late that gentleman's tastes have 
not inclined that way. Greenway has stepped in and taken 
up this line. Exactly forty gathered around his tables on 
Tuesday evening. 

* * # 

The chagrin of the young woman who aspires to be lit- 
erary and an adherent of woman's rights must have been 
great when old George left the name of her family out of 
his recently published will. People have for years com- 
mented upon the "expectations" of this daughter, mother 
and son, but alas, old bachelors are changeable and capri- 
cious as well as young maidens, and so in this case, as in 
others before it, the old chap did just what he was not ex- 
pected to do. Such is life. 

* * * 

Our young matrons are getting to have most unenviable 
reputations, if one may judge by bits of gossip that come 
floating backward across the Rockies. The Eastern tour- 
ist comes out here prepared to find the married women 
ready to take French dinners or moonlight Cliff suppers 
ad lib. Curiously enough, no one among the swagger set 
seems disposed to correct this silly notion. 

* * * 

One of the latest engagements was being discussed at a 
church social when a leading member thereof remarked it 
was not such a strange choice of Mamime, for she was 
always a GodVy-given girl. 



FREE TICKETS * ■» ORPHEUM 

BUY YOUR 

LENOX and IVORY SOAP 

Save Your Wrappers and Get 
Free Tickets to the Orpheum. 

THE 

JOHNSON-LOCKE MERCANTILE CO., 

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Will exchange for Lonai mul Ivory Soap Wrappers 
Free Tickets to the Orpheuh 

UNDER THE FOLLOWINQ CONDITIONS: 

If You Want a Send 25 Wrappers of LENOX SOAP 

25c Or 12 Wrappers of IVORY SOAP 

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and 6 Wrappers of IVORY SOAP 

If You Want a Send 50 Wrappers of LENOX SOAP 

50c Or 24 Wrappers of IVORY SOAP 

Reserved Seat Or else send 25 Wrappers of LENOX SOAP 

and 12 Wrappers of IVORY SOAP 

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(LDT. OF ABERDEEN.) 

V V o 

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Importers - HACONDRAY & CO. 



College San Rafael 



For Young Ladies 



Conducted by the Sisters of St. Dominlo, 

Full collegic course of studies. A boarding school of highest 
grade. Superb modern building:. Steam heated. Beautiful and 
commodious class rooms. Music and art rooms. 

Located in the lovely Magnolia Valley 
Unsurpassed for beauty and healthf ulness. Address, 



Mother Superior 

College San Rafael, San Rafael, Cal. 



FRENCH LIBRARY AND FRENCH CLASSES 

This library is the most important of its kind, containing; 20,000 books. 
Among: them are the best ancient and latest authors. Under the auspices 
of the library are French classes for adults only, afternoons and evenings. 
Graduate teacher^ from France give tuition. Terms for library, $1 admission. 
50 cents monthly. Terms for classes — $3 a month, 2 lessons a week, entitling 
pupils to literary membership. Apply— French Library, City of Paris Build- 
ing, 135 Geary street. 

The Solly Walter School of Illustration 

In Pen and Ink. 

26 O'Farrell street 

BROUGHAMS and COUPES (Rubber Tires) 
Tomkinson's Livery Stable 

57-59-61 Minna street, between First and 
Second. One block from Palace Hotel. 
Carriages and coupes at Pacific Union Club, 
corner Post and Stockton. Tel. Main 153 
Every vehicle requisite for weddings, par- 
ties, calling, shopping, business, or pleasure 
Special orders for four-in-hands. 
Tel. Main 153. Established 18fi2. 

J. Tomklnson, Proprietor 




SAN FRANCISCO MEWS LETTER. 



January 20, 1900. 




"We obey no wand but Pleasure's.'" — Tom Moore. 

LET us unite in praying that it is not a fluke, this pres- 
ent improvement in local theatricals. All told the 
week has been full of healthy entertainment for the play- 
goer: a practically new Shakespearean play at the Colum- 
bia, a delightful Oscar Wilde piece at the Alcazar, a Daly 
play at the California, in which a charming young actress 
made her first vital success in the Ada Rehan part, a first- 
rate comic opera production at the Tivoli, to say nothing 
of good vaudeville at the Orpheum and an operatic nov- 
elty at the Grand. Considering what we haven't had 
these last many months, I call this a pretty good week. 

First let us talk about The Winter's Tale. Not since a 
dozen or more years ago, when Mary Anderson visited us, 
had the piece been given in San Francisco. ODly the older 
generation remembered it in actual performances; only 
those funny persons who are pleased to call themselves 
"Shakespearean students" knew it well in the book, for 
The Winter's Tale is not the most exciting stuff to be met 
with in Elizabethian literature. It is perhaps the most 
aitificial and unhuman play that was ever written by a 
master dramatist. Had Shakespeare left us nothing else, 
not even the Home Education editor of the Call could give 
you his name and address to-day. But while not a gr°at 
play, as compared to others by the same hand, The Win- 
ter's Tale is still an enjoyable romance as compared to 
what the moderns tur:. out in a similar direction. And 
it has the lines; not as musical are they as the best of 
Shakespeare, but yet beautifully, wantonly musical. Such 
lines, when delivered by the players with anything like 
sane elocution, are in themselves a musical education for 
the jaded play-goer of the day. They celebrate "the beau- 
tiful phrase," they revive what little poetic instinct was 
ever in any of us. And in this day, when rough-shod Kip- 
lings and red-shirted Markhams make the music of the lan- 
guage, a little music is a blessed thing. 

As long as you don't wear long hair and take him too 
seriously, Shakespeare is still the most absorbing and 
skillful of playwriters. But it is a mistake to kneel when 
witnessing a performance of one of his dramas; it is un- 
comfortable, unnatural and dead against the real purpose 
of the theatre, which is to entertain us. William Shake- 
speare was a practical craftsman, who wrote plays for a 
practical theatre and a practical audience. That he had 
the genius and conscience to write real literature and 
permanent poetry at the same time is a fortunate thing 
for ourselves; for when his plays outlived their first vogue 
in the playhouse they were still to be found in the library. 
MSS. were preserved, and the managers and the public of 
posterity did the rest. But don't, I beg of you, don't go to 
the play with your head full of stiff traditions and cant rev- 
erence. There is nothing biblical about the Bard of Avon. 
He was a great dramatic artist, that is all, and his plays 
were written with the obvious desire to please the per- 
sons who spent their time and money on the performances. 
* it * 

The production of The Winter's Tale at the Columbia by 
the James-Kidder-Hanford combination, is remarkable for 
copious scenery built in good taste and art, and for a 
happy ensemble in the acting. Nobody in the cast is the 
bright particular, and everybody seems to have a gener- 
ous understanding of the play as a whole, and works for his 
neighbor as well as for himself. The result is an atmosphere 
of more charm than we get in most modern productions of 
the classics, and an absence of that painful effort at indi- 
vidual glorification on the part of the player. Individual 
errors, or what would appear to you and me to be errors 
there are in the acting — in what production is there 
none? — but the virtues of the performance triumph on the 
whole. Miss Kidder in the two roles of Hermoine and 
Perdita is to my mind convincing only in the latter. Her 
Hermoine is in too deep and tragic a key. It reflects 
none of the natural personality of the actress, and as a 
make-believe it fails because you are (or at least I am) 
ever conscious that it is that and nothing more. On the 
other hand, Perdita, a creature of higher spirits and 



bounding temperament, exacts from Miss Kidder those 
very qualities of grace, natural womanliness and easy wit 
that are her own. I have yet to be convinced that Miss 
Kidder has any real talent for the heavily serious. Every 
attempt of hers along this line only serves to emphasize 
her value as a comedy actress. Mr. Hanford is a heavy 
gentleman of the "good old school," who breathes hard in 
moments of excitement and works his face. Every day 
has its actor mannerisms. Our society comedians of the 
present wear out their trouser pockets and shoot their 
cuffs. Mr. Hauford remembers the time when pomposity 
and a bulging chest were the mode — indeed, he remembers 
a bit too well. However, in a perfunctory way his hand- 
ling of the jealousy-tainted Leontes is not without its 
good features. In the short but largely comic part of 
that classic "grafter," Autolycus, Mr. James is entirely 
admirable. At last he has learned to play comic parts. 
Very simple, too. He merely forgets all the large poses 
and struts of his heavy tragedy experience, and throws 
into his work all the easy, colloquial good nature and devil- 
ment that are his own in private life. 

Taken altogether, the production is highly credible; and 
it adds a new and desirable touch to the Shakespearean 
experience of the present generation of play-goers. 

* * * 

From the point of individual acting the success of the 
week has been made by Miss Mary Van Buren as the 
Countess Gucki in Augustin Daly's adaptation from the 
German play by the same name. Miss Van Buren 
had already revealed many symptoms of genuine artistry 
in more or less small or unimportant roles, but here in a 
part that was written for Ada Rehan by both the author 
and the adaptor; she had a complete chance, and her suc- 
cess was instantaneous. It is now an easy matter to pre- 
dict big things for this clever young woman. I am glad 
that I was among the few early birds that predicted them 
on the strength of lesser evidence. Still, anybody can say 
"I told you so," after the thing happens. My present 
pleasure is merely to record the first positive success of 
an actress who would appear to have all the qualifications 
for a brilliant professional career. Miss Van Buren has 
beauty, bearing, temperament, tact, and a comfortable 
sense of humor, and considering her few years of experi- 
ence, an amazing command of the technical details of her 
craft. Her voice is easy and companionable, and she knows 
how to put just enough and not too much color and empha- 
sis in the reading of the lines. In one of the earlier scenes 
of The Countess Gucki there is a speech of tremendous 
length that must be delivered without pause and without 
staginess. It requires a virtuoso in elocution to make it 
effective. I was delighted with the grace and spontaneity 
with which Miss Van Buren vanquished its difficulties. 
Another notable episode in her acting was the climax of 
the second act, which was worked up to with splendid 
cumulative effect. There is a warm, emotional strain in 
Miss Van Buren that only needs development. 

The rest of the cast was in happier accord than usual — 
the play seemed to fit. 

# * * 

As I told you in this same column several years ago, the 
Tivoli was (and still is) neglected in the matter of fair 
criticism. The policy of the papers seems to be some- 
thing like this : ' 'If the show is a good one, puff; if it is 
not so good, puff it anyway^there is always the money's 
worth at the Tivoli." An amiable scheme, this, but hardly 
just to management and patrons; for the sub-critics, 
knowing what they have to do, are not always persuaded 
that it is necessary to visit the performance prior to the 
puff. I am wondering if the people know just bow clever 
a production of The Idol's Eye is on at the Tivoli. Reading 
in the newspapers that it is hugely superior to the origi- 
nal by Frank Daniels, they are apt to be skeptical. That's 
where the injustice comes in. Without wild flattery, I 
may say that this performance is as lively and picturesque 
as any in the history of the bouse. Mr. Hartman cannot 
expect to be so happy in the Daniels part as was Mr. Dan- 
iels. A little man can do a great many foolish things that 
are funny, when in the hands of a bigger man they are 
merely foolish. But Hartman expresses himself admira- 
bly, and pitching the part in a new key makes it genu- 
inely comical. Mr. Wheelen, the original Jamie Mc- 



January »o, 1900. 



BAH i . - nil; 



r, duplicates his former s Meyers 

throws a lot of fun and pinper into the Naulch git 
fact there is not a real disaster In t] .1 the cho 

rus«s and stage management a< uouslv good If 

you are looking for an evening of melodloi nsihle 



Galifornia Theatre- 



l>>ili»r IfotUMI, 



fun. handsomely set, here is the loveliest sample of 
to WD 



it in 



Oscar Wilde's Lady Windermere's Fan is a strong, 
brilliant play — so strong, indeed, as to survive perform- 
ance at the hands of an entirely different class of players 
from that the author intended. The stock company at 
the Alcazar is not composed of what you would ca'l fash 
ionable people. These actors are with few exceptions 
plain people. The persouages in Lady Windermere.'* Fan 
are all fashionable, down to the servants. Despite its 
serious motive, the play is one of manners, but the serious 
interest seems to dominate, with or without the permission 
of the author. Denied the social atmosphere that is such 
a part of it, Lady Windermere 1 ! Fan is still an interesting 
performance as tbey give it at the Alcazar. The theatric 
situations are worked for their full value, and the men 
make a fairly decent showing in the famous third act. 
Of the new actress, Miss May Blaney, I can say nothing 
in praise. She is feeble and amateurish, and Lady 
Windermere would better have been played by any other 
woman in the company. Mr. Hastings has his good mo- 
ments in Lord Windermere, especially in the strenuous 
scene of the third act, and Miss Marie Howe is quite cred- 
ible as the Duchess. 

* * * 

A company of college-bred fox terriers, supported by 
Mile. Emmy and a young man with prominent front hair, 
is the banner attraction at the Orpheum. The canine 
actors are of the very best, and flowers and applause are 
theirs nightly. Prank Coffin sings well, but suffers for 
just the right kind of a popular song. Two ladies with 
Bne ropes of hair at full length sing and dance in rag-a- 
time. Their names are Hanson and Nelson, and they are 
clever. Colored comedians by the names of Hodges and 
Launchmere also do attractive stunts in song and dance, 
andRosner play his pneumatic piano to beat the band. 

* * * 

In the Haydn Symphony in D (No. 2) Mr. Holmes de- 
livered an easy, comprehensive reading at the first of a 
new series of symphony concerts that was given in the 
Grand Opera House on Thursday afternoon. His hand- 
ling of the Mendelssohn overture, "Ruy Bias," was also 
marked by good, musicianly feeling. But in Wagner's 
"Siegfried Idyl" and in the famous "Pathetique" sym- 
phony of Tscbaikowski he was considerably less impres- 
sive. Mr. Holmes, beyond doubt, is a fine musician and a 
staunch classicist, but he is an old man and lacking in that 
personal spell that enthuses his bandsmen and his au- 
ditors. Modern music, with its riot of color and rhythm, 
finds him cold and unsympathetic. I have the feeling thai 
Mr. Holmes does not approve of it. 

* * * 

Here are the bills tor the new week: The accommodat- 
ing Prawleys will rest on Monday night while Emma 
Nevada gives a farewell concert in the California. They 
open Tuesday with In, Paradise, a farcical comedy from 
the French that is said to be no nicer than it ought to be. 
Tlie School For Scandal is the Monday night bill for the 
James-Kidder-Hanford combination at the Columbia. ' The 
pieces for the rest of the week include Hamlet, Winter's 
Tale and Macbeth. Papinta, James O. Barrows, and Edna 
Bassett Marshall are the strengtheners for the new show 
at the Orpheum. The Tivoli's Idol's Eye has made a hit 
and will continue. Lord Cliumley, with Hastings in the 
name part, is the Monday production at the Alcazar. 

That Little Book 
" Babias," issued by Borden's Condensed Milk Co., New York, 
should be in the bands of ail young mothers. The hints it contains 
are invaluable to the inexperienced. Sent free upon application. 



After the play is over go where the fashionable crush goes, to the 
Cafe Zinkand, where the best beers, wines and suppers are to be had 
with a musical accompaniment by Stark's famous orchestra of 
strings. 

Fine Sanitary Plumbing at J. Ahlbach's, 136 Fourth street. 



SPFPI Al ir» B, ai 

I I — UlnU n^.i ,il Ihoso popular i 

50c , $1, $1 50, $2 
ITiaPMdaaDin. MME EMMA NEUADA 

A iiiiiiMiiti. imii n, „ iiriiirnmiiin . Mr. Loots' Itluinpiilicrtr, Vwllltt, 

Men Pratt, pianist. nowoDMll*. 

Gzill-F,-..-!-.!^ Tkon-l-rn THE POPULAB H008B. 
ailTOrnia 1 neai.re. Reservations i>y 'i'h>.nt>. Muln 1731 

Complete chance in programme, Oommenefna Rond , ay niirlit. 

January JNt. The Frowley pans in the. uproariously fanny 

Bane comedy from the French, 

IN PARADISE. 

Two yean In Paris; fourteen months In London; seven monthfl 

in Nov York city. 

In Preparation— The OUOROO, IVii cm *umc as ever. 



. Leasee. Mark Thall 
Manager. Phone, Main 25-1. 



G_ I . . __ L ' Tk«^l M Oottlob, Marx A Co., 

OlUmDia . heatre. Lessees and Managers. 

Magnificent success. LOUIS James, Katiiryn Kiddkb, Chahlkh 
B. Hanfohd, and a company of 37 people. 

To-night, to-morrow [Sunday] night. also Tuesday. Wednesday, 
Thursday, and Friday nights, 

THE WINTERS TALE. 

Monday night: The School for Scandal. Matineo Saturday, 
Hamlet. Saturday night, Macbeth. Suuday night, Othello 

Alcazar Theatre. Manager! L pho 

Week of January 29th, The New York Lyceum Theatre's most 
successful play, 

LORD CHUMLEY. 

By David Belasco and Henry C. DeMille, 
Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 
Alcazar Prices— 15c, 25c„ 35c., 50o. 

T!./^»l. i*^ — W_ -.-. Mrs. Ernestine Kreling, 
IVOll Vjpera rlOUSe. Proprietor and Manager. 

" Hoot Mon, Hang on Everybody ! " Commencing Monday, Jan. 
22d, second week of the enoimous success. Frank Daniel's comic 
opera, 

THE IDOL'S EYE 

Every evening and Saturday matinee. Secure seats early. Avoid 

the crowd. 

Popular Prices— 25c. and 50o. Telephone for seats. Bush 9, 

O r „L AI , __ San Francisco's Greatest Musio Hall. 
rpneUrn. O'Farrell St,, between Stockton and Powell streets. 



James O. Barrows & Co. 
Marshall & Co. 



PAPINTA 



Edna Bassett 
James Newman 



Hodges & Launchmere Hanson & Nelson 

Nelstone & Abbey Mile. Emmy'B Dogs 

Reserved^Seats 25o.: balcony 10o.; opera chairs and box seats BOo. 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday* and Sunday. 

Grand Opera House-Special. 

Thursday afternoons, January 18th, February 1st and 15th, and 
March 1st and 15th, at 3:15 o'clock, 

FIVE SYMPHONY CONCERTS 

Under the direction of Henry Holmes. Orchestra of 06 pieces. 

Subscription price for series: $5, 84, 83, 82, and 81. 

Sale opens at Sherman Clay Co.'s Thursday, Jan. 4th, at 9 a. m., 

and closes Thursday, Jan. llth, at 5 p. m. 

Seats for single concert, 81.50, $1, 75c,, 50c, and 25c. 

Western Turf Association, ber QO AmeZt:2 M Tars 

Congress. 

TANFORAN PARK, 

Third Meeting. dAN. 1st TO cJAN. 20th, 1900 INCLUSIVE 

Six high-class running races every weekday, rain or shine, beginning 
at 1:30 p. m. The ideal winter race track of America. Patrons step directly 
from the railroad cars into a superb grand stand, glass enclosed, where com- 
fortably housed in bad weather they can enjoy an unobstructed view of the 
races. 

Trains leave Third and Townsend streets at 9:00, 10:40, and 11:30 a. m.; and 
12:15. 12:35, 12:50, 1;25 p.m., returning immediately after last race and at 4:45 
p. m. Rear cars reserved for women and their escorts. No smoking. Valen- 
cia street ten minutes later. San Jose and Way Stations— Arrive at San 
Bruno at 12:15 p. m.; leave San Bruno at 4:00 and 4:45 p. m. Rates— San 
Francisco to Tanforan and return, including admission to track, 81.25. 
W. J. Martin, President. F. H. Green, Secretary and Manager. 



After the Theatre 



Go where the crowd goes — to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to Stark's matchless string band and enjoy the finest 

wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand is society's gathering place after the show is 

ove*. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 20, 1900. 




Briton and Books relating to South Africa and its affairs 
B er. * re many these days. Among the latest is 
"Briton and Boer," which contains a series 
of articles on both sides of the South African question by 
such well-known writers as the Right Hon. James Bryce, 
M. P., Sydney Brooks, Dr. F. V. Engelenburg, Karl 
Blind, Andrew Carnegie, Francis Charmes, Demetrius C. 
Boulger, and Max Nordau. They are reprinted by per- 
mission from The North American Review. The historical 
causes of the present war in South Africa are first con- 
sidered. This chapter is written by Mr. James Bryce, 
whose " Impressions of South Africa," a book of extreme 
impartiality, full of valuable data concerning that country, 
has been much read and widely quoted from of late. In a 
second chapter Mr. Brooks writes of "England and the 
Transvaal," from the English point of view, calling forth 
an answer — a vindication of the Boers — from a writer who 
signs himself "A Diplomat." Mr. F. V. Engelenburg, of 
Pretoria, contributes "A Transvaal View of the South 
African Question." "The Boers do not ask for mercy," 
he says, "they ask for justice. * * * In the past the Boers 
have been able to fight against immensely superior odds. 
They feel that the final victory will be theirs, for they 
know they have right on their side." Karl Blind adds a 
chapter on " The Transvaal War and European opinion," 
in which he does not hesitate to express his conviction that 
all Europe is united in condemning the attack made by the 
English Government upon the independence of the South 
African Republic, in violation of the clearest treaty rights 
solemnly guaranteed in London in 1884. "Who can doubt," 
he adds, "that this is a war as unrighteous as it is un- 
necessary and pregnant with grave perils for England's own 
future?" Andrew Carnegie gives his views in an article 
entitled "The South African Question." He believes that 
Mr. Gladstone was well advised years ago to adopt the 
policy of peaceful co-operation; that Lord Salisbury was 
equally well advised recently by able servants of the Crown 
in South Africa to continue Mr. Gladstone's wise course 
and avoid raising the dangerous racial issue. "Will the 
Powers Intervene ?" is the question discussed by. Francis 
Charmes, and the aoswer he reaches is that while public 
opinion will condemn the war, the Governments will not 
move. The possibility of a Continental alliance agaiost 
England is the theme of Demetrius C. Boulger's contribu- 
tion to "Briton and Boer." The closing chapter of the 
book, "Philosophy and Morals of War," is by Max Nordau. 
He comments freely upon the unanimity of hatred against 
England among the people of the European continent, and 
explains it in part thus: "The sentiment has a variety of 
roots. Some of these lie on the surface, others are more 
deeply concealed. Some originate from noble motives, 
others from fairly ignoble ones. When David and Goliath 
step into the ring, brutal realists will always bet on the 
giant; .but knightly enthusiasts will pray for the success of 
his diminutive opponent. The fact that a tiny people face 
death without hesitation to defend its independence against 
an enemy fabulously superior in number, or to die in the 
attempt, presents an aspect of moral beauty which no 
soul, attuned to higher things, will disregard. Even 
friends and admirers of England — yea, even the English 
themselves — strongly sense the pathos in the situation of 
the Dutch Boers, who feel convinced that they are fighting 
for their national existence, and agree that it equals the 
pathos of Leonidas, William Tell, and Kosciusko." The 
book has for frontispiece a portrait of President Kriiger. 
Many illustrations adds to its interest, and a map of the 
Boer Republics supplement it. It is full of warm meat 
for that gratuitous gentleman whom we have come to 
know as the " Boer sympathizer." 

Briton and Boer: Reprinted by permission from the North American Re- 
view, Harper & Brothers, Publishers, New York. Price, $1.25. 

Michael Rolf, A love story rather out of the usual line is 

Englishman. "Michael Rolf, Englishman," by Mary L. 

Pendered. Maia Lovel, upon learning that 

her father is insolvent, seeks a situation, much against 



the wishes of her sister, the Hon. Mrs. Waring. She 
goes as companion-governess to a girl of sixteen, who 
lives with her brother in a quiet market- town of Western 
England. It is something of a shock to the daughter of 
Colonel Lovel to find that Michael Rolf, the brother of her 
charge, is a grocer, and that the house from basement to 
garret is redolent of cheese and other condiments. After 
three hundred or more pages we find Maia not only re- 
signed to her fate, but offering to stay with Rolf always. 
To him she says: "I will not deny that a year ago I thought 
a man who kept a shop belonged to a peculiar species 
with which I could have nothing in common. I know now 
the class does not make the individual; trade cannot de- 
base a man, though a man may debase trade. And our 
conventional ideas are strangely inconsistent, because our 
generals, our admirals, our barristers, artists, clergy, all 
sell something and are paid. Barter is barter, whether 
the commodity be tea and sugar, beer or brains." But 
she is not called upon to endure the shop, for Michael Rolf 
comes into a fortune, they have a pretty home in the coun- 
try, and live happily ever after, in true fairy-tale fashion. 

Michael Rolf, Englishman : by Mary L. Pendered. Doubleday & McClure 
Co., Publishers, New York. Price, 81.25. 

The Four-Masted Forty funny fancies grouped under such 
Cat-Boat titles as "Instinct Supplied to Hens," 

"The Poor Was Mad," "The Missing 
Word Bore," make up. a small volume of nonsense by Mr. 
Charles Battell Loomis, which takes its Dame from the 
title-story, "The Four-Masted Cat-Boat." The author's 
work in the humorous department of The Century and in 
Puck is well-known, and many of the articles here put 
into book form, first met printer's ink in their columns. 
There are some very good things in it, but it must be taken 
in homeopathic doses. It is not a book to be read at one 
sitting. It is illustrated by Florence Scoville Shinn. 

The Pour-Masted Cat-Boat: by Charles Battell Txiomis. The Century 
Co., Publishers. New York. Prioe, 11.25. 

My Study A new and most beautiful edition of Mr. flam- 
Fire, ilton Wright Mabie's "My Study Fire," has 
just been brought out in a manner that reflects 
great credit on its publishers. It is now some ten years 
since these charming essays first made their appearance, 
but they have lost none of their fascination. They were 
and will remain for many years to come something to be 
thankful for — these reveries and meditations called forth 
by the potency of the study fire and its friendly flame. 
The book is sympathetically illustrated by Maude Alice 
and Genevieve Cowles. 



My Study Fire: by Hamilton Wriffht Mabie. 
ers, New York. Price. §2.5(). 



Dodd. Mead & Co., Publish- 



" Forget-Me-Nots," by Lillian Leslie Page, is a little 
booklet in verse, printed in green and brown, with dark 
green covers. The opening stanzas describe a day at 
Catalina, and further on the Sierras and the "Vale of Sac- 
ramento" are eulogized. It has numerous illustrations 
and vignettes, and a portrait of the author serves as 
frontispiece. Whitaker& Ray Co., Publishers, San Fran- 
cisco. Price, 50 cents. 

"The Story of Ronald Kestrel," by A. J. Davidson, au- 
thor of "God's Foundling"; "The Heiress of the Season," 
by Sir William Magnay, Bart., author of "The Pride of 
Life," etc., and "A Corner of the West," by Edith Hen- 
rietta Fowler, author of "The Young Pretenders," "The 
Professor's Children," etc., are the latest additions to 
Appleton's Town and Country Library. D. Appleton & 
Co., Publishers. Price, 50 cents. 

•> " The White Terror," by F61ix Gras, is a romance of the 
French Revolution and the first years that followed it and 
is a continuation of the "Reds of the Midi" and "The Ter- 
ror." It brings to an end the adventures of Adeline and 
Pascalet. It is translated from the Provencal by Cath- 
erine A. Janvier. D. Appleton & Co., Publishers, Price, 
$1.60. 

"The Last of the Mohicans," by James Fennimore 
Cooper, is now to be had in the "Pocket English Classics" 
series. The book is prefaced by a brief biography and 
various notes by Mr. W. K. Wickes, M. A. (Amherst). The 
Macmillan Co., Publishers, New York. Price, 50 cents. 



January 20. 1900. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS U-TTKR. 



•ature Pictures by American Poets," selected and 
edited by Annie Russel Marble, A. M , is a most a 1 
log book, not only because it is an aid to nature study, but 
because it must ~thetic observation and culture. 

The author's aim is to select from the works of represen- 
tative American poets certain pictures of nature, either 
vignettes or specific objects, or broad landscape effects. 

divided into five parts under the following headings. 
"Landscape Vistas." "Music of Winds and .Storms." 
" Sea, Stream and Tides," " Bird-notes and Crickets' 
Chirp," and " Flower Soups." The selections are ad- 
mirably chosen, and ranjte from Bryant, America's first 
nature-poet, to Lloyd Mifflin — "whose soul vibrates to the 
music of Nature's calm and storm," and whose nature- 
pictures in sonnet form have so greatly enriched American 
poetry. Macmillan Co., Publishers. Price, $1.25. 

"Great Pictures, as Seen and Described by Famous 
Writers" is a handsome book, edited and translated by 
Esther Singleton, author of "Turrets, Towers, and 
Temples" and translator of "The Music Dramas of Richard 
Wagner." It records the impressions of many great 
writers and literary tourists in their saunterings among 
galleries and museums. The object in view is not to make 
a selection of the greatest pictures in the world, but to 
bring together those that have made a powerful impres- 
sion on great minds. Of modern painters only Turner and 
Rossetti are included. There are translations from eminent 
French and German writers, and many extracts from the 
writings of Walter Pater, John Ruskin, Charles Lamb, 
Austin Dobson, Sheiley and others. The book is profusely 
illustrated. Dodd, Mead & Co., Publishers, New York. 
Price $2.00. 

Mrs. Frances Blundell's favorite musical story, "The 
Duenna of a Genius," is dedicated to Paderewski. She 
says: "And so I have bethought me of calling upon you. 
who, more than any living man, perhaps, have made music 
a reality to our generation; who have discovered to us 
beauties indescribable, subtleties unending, — that the mere 
sound of your name, evoking as it must a thousand ex- 
quisite memories, may give expression to this my fancy, 
and make my music live." 

"Browning's Shorter Poems," selected and edited by 
Franklin T. Baker, A. M. Professor of English in Teachers 
College, Columbia University, is the latest issue in Mac- 
millan's series of "Pocket English Classics." These books 
are artistic in make-up and reasonable in price. Intended 
primarily for use in secondary schools, each volume has a 
critical introduction and copious explanatory notes. The 
Macmillan Co., Publishers, New York. Price, 25 cents. 



BOOKS RECEIVED. 

Cassell&Co. : "King Richard II" and "The Tempest," of National 
Library Series, Price, 50 cents. 

The Macmillan Co. : "Prairie Folks," by Hamlin Garland, Price, 
$1.25; "Our Native Birds," by D. Lange, Price, $1. 

Little, Brown & Co. : "The Knights of the Cross," first half, by 
Henryk Sienkiewicz, Price, $1. 

M. E. B. 



A splehdid assortment of California's winter flowers is always to 
be found at Leopold's, the Post street flower house. Winter flowers 
are the glory of California and Leopold's are always fragrant and 
fresh. 



— Mat — Rather a morose sort of man, isn't he? Madge 
—Yes; but his heart's in the right place. Mat— How do 
you know that? Madge — He told me last night that I 
was in sole possession of it. 

To be sure that you are drinking champagne always order a bottle 
of Mnmm's. It is the wine of society. Have it served cold, and you 
are safe in doing the proper thing. 



Miss Pieeoe, formerly teacher of arts at Newman & Levinson's 
has opened a studio at 609 Polk St. Lessons given. Orders taken 

Maison Tobtoni, French Rotisserie, 111 O'Fanrell street. Private dinine 
rooms; banquet hall. S. Constantini. Proprietor. 

Cleveland L. Dam, Attomer-at-Law. 503 California St. Tel. Main 313. 



* C= *5^ t 




Ancestral 

Cleanliness. 



Proverbial for its thorough- 
ness. Pearline users admire 
the pluck that a woman iv 

to get such cleanliness in such 
laborious ways. No excuse tor 
lack of cleanliness now. Pearline has changed 
the situation. Thorough cleanliness, witn ease, 
comfort, safety, economy, and time to spare — 
by the use of Pearline. A modern woman does 
her work in a modern way, with Pearline. sra 



The Drummers' Inn 

105 Sansome street, San Francisco. 

Robi. D. Hagerty, proprietor 



Telephone Main 5611. 



The Manhattan Cafe 



25 Geary Street. 

Ladies' Cafe and Wine Rooms, 25 Brook Place, S. F. 



Worthington Ames 



riember Stock and Bond Exchange 

Broker in Stocks, Bonds, and Municipal Securities 

Safe Deposit Building, 324 Montgomery street. Telephone Main 1381 

School of Elocution 

Miss Elizabeth McDonald, 1927 California St. 
Delsarte ^Esthetic Physical Culture. Just formed, lessons in class to child- 
ren. Lessons private and in class. 

Dr. Charles W. Decker, Dentist 



Phelan Building: Rooms 6, 8, 10. 



Entrance 'WS Market street 



ANNUAL MEETING 

Sierra Nevada Silver Mining Company. 

The regular annual meeting of the stockholders of the Sierra Nevada Sil- 
ver Mining Company will be held at the office of the company, room No. 14, 
Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal., on 

WEDNESDAY, THE 17th DAY OF JANUARY, 1900, 
at the hour of 1 o'clock p. m„ for the purpose of electing a Board of Diiect- 
ors to serve for the ensuing year, and the transaction of such other business 
as may come before the meeting. Transfer books will close on Monday, Jan- 
uary 15th, at 3 o'clock p. m. E. L. PARKER, Seoretary. 
Office— Room 14, Nevada block, 309 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Paauhau Sugar Plantation company. 

Dividend No, 11, 35 cents per share, of the Paauhau Sugar Plantation Co., 
will be payable at the office of the company, 327 Market street, on and after 
Wednesday, J.anuary 10, 1900. Transfer books will close on Saturday, Janu- 
ary 6, 1900, at 12 o'clock m. E. H. SHELDON, Secretary. 

THE CALIFORNIA HOTEL. Dinner.-Sunday, Jan. 2i, 1900. 

Eastern Oysters, Half-Shell. 
Soup.— Cream of Cauliflower a la Dubary; Consomme Cocky Leeky. 
Hoes D'OZIuvres. — Celery en Branche; Olives; Salted Almonds; Pickles. 
Fish. — Boiled Salmon, Sauce Hollandaise ; Filet of Sole a la Joinville ; Pom- 

mes Nouvelles. 
Boiled. — Dupee Ham, Champagne Sauce. 
Entrees.— Stewed Terrapin a la Maryland en Caisse ; Mallard Duck Saute a 

la St. Hubert; Lamb Chops, Reform Club Style; Banana Fritters, Sauoe 

au Cognac. 
Roast.— Prime Ribs of Beef au Jus ; Suckling Pig, Apple Sauce; Stuffed 

Chicken au Cresson. Punch— Lalla Rookh. 
Vegetables. — Browned Sweet, Boiled and Mashed Potatoes; Boiled Rice: 

Cauliflower au Gratin; Succotash; Asparagus, Sauce Creme. 
Cold Meats— Roast Beef ; Boer's Head aux Pistaches; Smoked Beef 

Tongue; Ham. 
Salads.— Lettuce ; Romaine; Esearoll; Lobster Mayonnaise. 
Dessert. — Apple Charlotte. Lemon Sauce; Mince Pie; Orange Cream Pie; 

Chocolate Eclairs; Vanilla Ice Cream; Assorted Nuts; Cluster Raisins; 

Assorted Cakes ; American, Cream, Edam, and Roquefort Cheese; 

Fruit in Season; Smyrna Figs; Tea and Coffee. 
Dishes not on this menu can be ordered at restaurant prices. Dinner 6 to 8 pan 
R, H. Warpield & Co,, Proprietors. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 20, 1900. 




e1e0Ker=0n 



THE HIGHBINDBE'S 8IDE OF IT. 

Me name See Yup, 
Heap highbinder, 

A lie samee hatchetman ; 
Bye urn bye me kill em Sam Yup — 

Wassa nialla Mellican? 

Wassa malla? 
You no likee 

Hab me kill um Chinaman? 
Wha' fo' then, you all time talkee — 

Me no sabe Mellican. 

Wassa malla 
All time talkee 

" Heap too muchee Chinaman"? 
When me kill, you raise um hellee— 
Me no sabe Mellican. 

Too muchee Chinee 
Population, 

So I kill em when I can ; 
Then you take me County Jailee 

'Cause X kill um Chinaman! 



Accepting my advice of last week, Mr. John Stanton 
has secured a badge, and now every office-seeker in town 
knows that he is a really and truly Park Commissioner. 
But the life of this once Bohemian painter is not all joy 
and glory. Hide himself as he may in studio, home or the 
impenetrable jungles of Golden Gate Park, the job-chaser 
is hot on his trail. 

It seems that Mr. Stanton, like all good Celts, has an 
uncountable number of relations; and all of these relations 
have an uncountable number of needy friends; and most of 
these friends have a passionate ambition to work for the 
city at short hours and long pay. They visit him in the 
dawn, they visit him at dusk, they break in on him in the 
still watches of the night, shouting the glad cry of the 
clan and chorusing for jobs. 

Says one applicant: "Mr. Stanton, I worked for your 
beloved father for twenty-five years. He was a fine man, 
so he was. Now I want to work for his son. I've not 
been feeling well these last few years, and I think a nice 
situation as day watchman in the Park, seeing that no- 
body runs away with the peacocks and Douglas Tilden's 
statue, would do me a world of good. Ail I need is fresh 
air and plenty of rest." 

Stanton explains that the Park is not an open-air hos- 
pital that is paying salaries to its patients, and another 
man accosts him. He is about sixty-five years of age, 
and he wants a superintending gardenership in South 
Park. He is also Irish. "Me friend Carr, sir," he says, 
"he has had the bad luck to doy, sir; he was the boss gar- 
dener in South Park, sir, and the last words he said to me 
wuz: 'See Mr. Stanton, and tell him I wus an old friend of 
his cousin, Dr. Galway, and that me last words wuz to 
give you the job. Now I can rest easy.' " 

The Park Commissioner looks over a book a moment 
and asks: 

"What did you say his name was?" 

"Carr, sir." 

"Well, there is no Carr on the list. The nearest to it is 
a South Park gardener by the name of Kerr." 

"Shure, sir, that's the same, but it isn't for the loikes of 
me to call anny good man cur; not even wan he is alive." 

"When did you say he died?" 

"I said nothing about it. It was some small time ago." 

"You bet your life it was," says Stanton; "the man 
died four years ago. Besides, I don't believe he willed 
you the job, anyway; and you aren't husky enough to fill 
it, even if I gave it to you. Why, you would have to lean 
up against a fence to eat. Next!" 

And so it goes all day long and half the night, until 
Stanton wishes from the depths of his soul that he had 
never bought a badge and been found out. "How the 
deuce," he asks, "is a man going to get out in the Park 
and improve nature, with a mob like this at his heels?" 



The arrest in New Y"ork for shoplifting of Mrs. Lillian 
Scofield, who will be recognized by San Franciscans, when 
told that Libby Stowell, "Lady Lansmer and Mrs. Lillian 
Scofield are one, as a character of the seventies, is just an 
incident in a career as full of adventure as a Sunday news- 
paper is of rot. 

She appeared upon the scene in this city when mining 
stocks were on the boom, and a woman of her dash and 
wit was a treasure to promoters. She was taken up at 
once, was useful, and gathered of the crumbs which fell 
from the loaves which she brought to he<* employers' 
tables nearly a hundred thousand dollars. With this 
capital she went into theatricals and made sensations on 
each side the continent. The sensations were not of the 
kind that actor or manager seeks, however, they proved 
very costly to Libby Stowell, as she was then known, and 
when the fortune which she had made was about gone, she 
went into the lodging house business, that haven of refuge 
for ageing dames of the Libby Stowell type. One day a 
broker whom she had known in better days, Nat Hatch, 
was found dead in her back yard. She was arrested, and 
for the moment the noose swung in the direction of her 
even then white neck; but it was pulled back, she was re- 
leased, and the case is all but forgotten. 

Now she has been arrested and charged with shop- 
lifting. A tame erding. 



When Madge doth pass mine eyes before, 
With skirts that trail the pavement o'er, 
To praise in verse that queenly train 
I vainly try. 

But, woe! I think of all the dirt 
Up-gathered by that sweeping skirt, 
And I can but of microbes sing 
And bacilli. 

* * # 

If of a sunny afternoon you should see strolling along 
Market street a remarkably handsome man of noble phy- 
sique and faultless tailoring, who looks as though he hadn't 
a care in the world, make up your mind that he is Edward 
P. Moran, retired journalist and recently appointed chief 
examiner of the Civil Service Commission. No longer does 
the city editor rule it over Moran. He knows no blue 
pencil but his own, and his life is one soft dream of ease 
and arrogance. It was noised about by the know-it-alls 
that when Moran received this appointment he would get 
writer's cramp doing signed statements for the Examiner; 
but not a line of his has appeared in print since the day of 
his separation from Mr. Hearst's paper, and he positively 
refuses to be interviewed or photographed. In truth a 
wonderful change has come over this once industrious, ap- 
proachable man, but his wit is still with him. 

A fresh reporter called at the Moran chambers the 
other day, helped himself to a perfectp, tossed the wrap- 
per at Mayor Phelan's photograph, and said : 

"Say, Ed, you're the Commissioner and ought to know, 
what's the fattest job you've got left out here in the 
Hall ?" 

"Chief of Police," answered Moran. 

* * * 

Wherein does Mary 8cott offend?— 

For there are some who say 
It is not very nice of her 

To hire a male valet. 

If women must compete with men, 
And in man's realm raise Hades, 

It's just, it seems to me, that men 
Should do the work of ladies. 



Some ten years ago a woman by the name of Martin was 
left stranded in Santa Clara with a family of six or seven 
children. Kindly disposed residents of tine home city set 
her up in business in a fruit and vegetable stand. It be- 
came the fashion to patronize her. Her eldest boy, a 
sharp, wirery little fellow, delivered her goods and became 
a warm favorite with Santa Clara housekeepers. He 
showed a love for horses, and a number of horse owners 
got him to look after their favorites. In the course of a 
year or so, the lad disappeared from Santa Clara. Soon 
after his mother sold out her business and moved away 
also. Rumors began to drift down to Santa Clara that 



January 20, 1900. 



SAN fra: iter. 



Mrs Martin was roll in i» in wealth, that she had a home of 
her own, and that her younger children were attending 
the best of schools. For a time Santa Clara gossips failed 
to locate the oldest boy. They did so at last, however, 
and were amazed to learn that he was drawing a salary of 
ten thousand and more a year. He has been absent from 
California for a number of years, but has returned and is 
registered at the Palace Hotel, "Skeets" Martin, one of 
the most successful jockeys on the turf. 

• • * 

Why flout poor Mormon Roberts? Why, indeed? 

He has but four 
Wives to demand new frocks and hats, to plead 
Each day for more 
b and chiffons. Fray let the culprit slide, 
Sii might be his ere 1900 's died. 
So shall his crime due punishment provide. 
No public lash could score so deep his hide. 

• « * 

In one of Acting Chief Biggy's "new broom" raids on 
the tenderloin lately, a member of the Chief's tried and 
trusted retinue came upon a badly scared Chinaman who 
was biding in a cupboard. The knight of the star and but- 
tons dragged the refugee out into the daylight and pro- 
ceeded to enter his name in a book of handy reference 
which he carried. The yellow fellow seemed to have some- 
thing on his mind, for when the policeman bad made a 
note of his name, he said: 

"Say, paldnah, you let me see Missah Biggy, hey?" 

"Biggy!" exclaimed the constable, aghast. "What on 
earth do you want of Biggy?" 

The Chinaman lowered his voice significantly: 

"My name Hop Sing Gow. Biggy he know me. Me 
got heap big political pull — you sabe?" 

The peeler, imagining that he had nabbed the Chinese 
Consul, brought the culprit before the Chief, and an- 
nounced that he had bagged big game. 

"Who are you?" asked Chief Biggy of the little Oriental. 

"You no know me?" he asked, throwing out his breast- 
bone proudly. "Me Hop Sing Gow. Me Jim Dunne's 
cook. You sabe — Missa Dunne he expect dinnah five 
o'clock — he no catch um dinnah he raise um row." 

Mr. Dunne got his dinner. 

• * * 

A prominent young doctor recently called at the office 
of that excellent surgeon, Dr. Bazet. 

"I have a very important operation to perform in the 
morning, Doctor. I don't like tackling it by myself: I 
came to ask if you would assist me." 

"What! I assistl I, Dr. Bazet! No, sir; Dr. Bazet 
never assists. When I operate I require six assistants 
myself. Dr. Bazet never assists; nevaire." 

That is all. 

THIS is the time to buy dry goods, while the big sale is 
on at J. J. O'Brien's. Golf capes in all variety, 
woolen waists, all kinds of dress fabrics, towels, under- 
wear, hosiery, laces, gloves, trimmings — in fact, every- 
thing that is to be had at a first-class dry goods estab- 
lishment is on sale at J. J. O'Brien's at sensationally low 
prices. The honored name of this great store assures 
every visitor fair dealing and polite attention. There is 
one department devoted exclusively to the sale of men's 
haberdashery and underwear. Good, warm underwear is 
a safe thing to have next to one this kind of weather. 

A fihe assortment ol new art goods is being displayed for the holi- 
days in the art rooms of William Morris, 248 Sutter street. These 
include paintings in oils and water colors, pastels, engravings, 
etchings and fancy prints. Frames and the materials for making 
them are to be seen in great variety, and in the gallery there is a 
picture show that will appeal to all lovers of art. 

Exolusive chinaware, spotless napery, faultless attention and 
superb cooking are specialties of Swain's Bakery. There are to be 
found in this famous restaurant — a landmark in San Francisco for 
twenty years— the elegance, simplicity, and homelike quiet that are 
appreciated by well-bred people. Orders are taken for breads, pas- 
tries, chicken sandwiches, etc. 

No man glories in the fact that he is bald ; take warning in time if 
your scalp itches, it is just a reminder that you will sooner or later 
become bald. Use Smith's Dandruff Pomade, the only positive cure 
for itching scalp. 

Fink stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. Cooper & Co. 
746 Market street. San Francisco. 



The 



7 In ■ 



Osteopathic Institute 

Dr, K C. Moore. Dr. J. F. Haney, A. T. Moore. See retary. 
Chronic Diseases and Deformities SUG I SM t 1 1 Y treated 
204 Sutter St.. San Francisco. Phone, Main 100. 

AUTOMOBILES to the FRONT! 



The Sparks Machine 
the Best. : : : 

The lightest, strongest, cheapest and most durable. It climbs the steepes 
(Trades and is practicable on all kinds of roads. 

It is what everybody wants. 

There is an active demand lor the company's stook. 

There is more money to be made In Automobiles than In Oil or Mining. 

A limited amount of stook is offered at One Dollar per share. PaV, value $10 
Full information at the office of the 

Sparks Automobile Company 

325 Parrott Buildine, San Francisco, Cal. S. GU0DEN0UGH, Secretary. 

EQUITABLE (X COMPANY 

This Company owns United States patent to 
160 acres of land, located in the very center- of 
the oil belt of the ::::::;:;:: 

KERN COUNTY DISTRICT 

And surrounded by flowing wells. This dis- 
trict bids fair to become the richest oil region 
in the world :;:;:::: ; : : : : 

Stock Listed on California Oil Exchange. 

- ._ ' „ . 5000 SHARES TREASURY STOCK 

NOW EOr bale for Development Purposes at S 

£i ONE DOLLAR PER SHARE 

No further stock will be offered except at a 
large advance in price :::::;::: 

OFFICE--405 Montgomery St., Room 5, S. F. 



CITY STREET IMPROVEMENT CO. 

Proprietors • Fifth floor. Mills Buildine, San Franoisco 

Ri+i irrti^r. Min^c Santa Cruz and Kine: City, 
DIIUIIIOII 1 111100. Monterey county, Cal. 

Contractors for all kinds of street work, bridees and railway construction, 
wharves, jetties and seawalls. 



La Grande Laundry Telephone Bush ia 

Principal office, 23 Powell street, opposite Baldwin Hotel. 
Branch— 11 Taylor street, near Golden Gate avenue 
Laundry— Twelfth street, between Folsom and Howard 
streets. San Francisco. 

FINE IMPORTED 

$30 - Scotch Tweeds == $40 

Also a large line of High-Geade Serges, Worsteds; • 
Vestings, Golf Knickerbockers, and Hose ; : : : 

Cpi-a^jal Have just received from London shipment of novelties in 
0|JCv*ICll ladies' Costume Cloths. Inspection Invited. - 

CRAIG BROTHERS, Importing Tailors 

120 Sutter Street, bet, Kearny and Montgomery streets. Take elevator. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 20, 1900. 




" Hear the Crier 1" " What the devil art thou ? " 
"One that will play the devil, sir, with you." 



H 



! Christian Science people, 

Yon are ft funny folk ; 
The funniest things you tell us, 
And swear they are no joke. 

A discovery you've made 

Astounding all creation ; 
Diseases don't exist 

They are just imagination I 

Oh what good news you bring, 

How much it ought to please us, 

That neither ache nor pain 
Can any longer tease us I 

And yet it's very queer, 

And this in you I'm blaming 
That, when there is no disease 

To heal disease you're claiming. 

MR. JOHN T. KEATING, a School Trustee of Chicago, 
is dissatisfied. Mr. John T. Keating is an Irishman 
by birth, and apparently regards the land of his adoption, 
and its institutions, as being little more or less than a use- 
ful tail to the Irish kite. Mr. John T. Keating, while not, 
perhaps, directly connected with the Cronin murder, or 
the Molly Maguire assassinations, or any of the other con- 
spicuous illustrations of Irish-American patriotism, is ob- 
viously "forninst" the government of his native land, if not 
all other kinds of government. In proof of his hostility, 
Mr. John T. Keating wants a new history of England 
written — a history which will not contain any reference to 
England as "the mother country," and which "will show 
the rapaoity and tyranny of England in their true light." 
The task is not a hard one. Why not get "Judge" Cooney 
to write a history. He could be relied upon to show up 
England in great shape. 

THE Crier is filled with fear that the spasmodic efforts 
of the Police Department will cease in a convulsion 
caused by fright at its own temerity. It has startled a 
few flocks of soiled doves from their own cotes and sent 
them scattering over the entire city to settle and scandal- 
ize respectable neighborhoods. It has taken a few notes 
on the habits of the gentlemanly card sharp and confi- 
dence men, and incidentally viewed a few ground- 
floor dance halls with conservatories attached, and pre- 
sumably enjoyed the trip, but it does not take even a 
policeman's wisdom to discern on any of the principal 
thoroughfares of this city a greater nuisance than any 
that has so far received the attention of the "upper 
office." The San Francisco masher, that parody on man- 
hood, ogling, insulting women, deserves the same attention 
that has been forced upon his superior of the other sex. 

INSTEAD of imposing a tax on the nickel-in-the-slot 
telephone, why not impose it on the nickel-in-the-slot 
cigar and drink machine? When you drop your nickel in 
a telephone, it is with a reasonable certainty that you will 
get value received. When you drop it in one of those 
cheap-john gambling machines, it is a goner ten times out 
of eleven. Marked cards and loaded dice are the scales of 
justice compared to this wholesale scheme of larceny. 
The nickel-in-the-slot machine should be suppressed, or 
else regularly inspected, sealed, and guaranteed to be 
square by officers of the law. It is the gold brick game 
on the installment plan. 

SINCE her noble success as the stocking model in David 
Belasco's "Naughty Anthony," Blanche Bates has 
been taken under the wing of that famous play and actress 
maker for a term of five years. Home day it may be said 
of Miss Bates that she started in at the foot and worked 
up. 

SCTING Chief of Police Biggy declares himself in favor 
of closing up all the dives whose private boxes con- 
nect with bed rooms. But why walk down stairs when he 
can find the same thing above ground? At Marchands 
they supply an elevator. But perhaps there is a 
distinction between professional and amateur sinners. 



IT is much to be regretted that there is no method by 
which such creatures as the Rev. Dowie, who is a scoun- 
drel and a pretender, can be prevented from sending mis- 
sionaries abroad. This rank old fraud prospers by the 
credulity of dupes. Pretending to be a representative of 
the divine, he is in reality an avaricious bunko man, using 
prayer instead of the gilded brick, and rolling his eyes to 
heaven instead of carrying an ace up his sleeve. Jail 
would be the proper place for Dowie, and asylums for 
most of his followers. To term the latter fools is to treat 
them too mildly, but it is a reproach to intelligence that 
they are permitted to scatter their idiocy among heathen 
who are in every respect better and wiser than they. 

A FALLEN Woman met a Righteous Indignation from 
which she tried vainly to escape. At last, being 
cornered, she turned to the Indignation and said: "Why 
do you insist in pursuing me and making my life a burden?" 
"I am One Chosen," said the R. I., to chastise Shame 
and to cleanse the City of its Uncleanness. At present I 
have a Mission to perform." "I surmise from what you 
say," said the Fallen Woman, "that you must be the 
Wrath of God." "You are entitled to another Surmise," 
replied the Righteous Indignation. "I am the Acting Chief 
of Police." Moral: New Brooms sweep clean. 

HURROO for me good friend, Dr. Danziger, who 
swatted Attorney Wise on the seat of his unreason I 
Too long has the fresh attorney attempted to make mon- 
keys of the witnesses who come up for cross-examination. 
Wise is now in bed suffering a recovery and making up 
his mind to lead a better life. Danziger says that he is 
not in bed, but only faking. But this is merely modesty 
on the doctor's part. Danziger is a capital litterateur, but 
he knows that there are times when the upper-cut is 
mightier than the pen. Take warning, ye bullies of the 
bar, take warning! 

FAITH, arrah, Mr. Dooley, 
It's a thing that grieves us truly, 
When we see yer shtuff appearin' with 

Such regularity; 
And with all your genius burnin' 
It's a pity ye ain't learnin' 
That between enough and too much there's 
A great disparity. 

Rest awhile, or talk in Swedish, 
Chinee di'lect, Frinch or Yiddish ; 
Give the public moind a change unless 

Ye're talkin' just for fun. 
If ye don't, it's me that's thinkin' 
That ye're market will be sin kin'. 
And ye'll cease to be a gold mine for 

Yourself and Mr. Dunne. 

ACTIVITY among the rival Tongs promises a renascent 
boom in Chinatown stories and dramas. The only 
drawback is it takes a peculiarly brave white man to stay 
on the spot and gather his local color, which is a dark 
deep red just at present. 

LUCKY Baldwin will take a bunch of hula-hula girls to 
Cape Nome this spring. The weather is unromanti- 
cally cold at Nome, but somebody ought to chaperone the 
girls just the same. 

SCHOOL directors will hold no more sessions in secret.— Daily 
Paper. 
Now just what does this mean? 

EVEN the admirers of Caruegie's prejudice against dy- 
ing rich do not think that the desire to live up to it 
is best demonstrated by paying tolls on Hoar's speeches. 

EN have ceased to war and riot. 

Peace is in our broad domain, 
City Hall's serene and quiet, 

Politicians breathe again. 

Has the Dawfl of Peace arisen? 

Mocking Echo answers "Nit, oh I 
Harry Scott is out of office, 

Edward Sheehan's also ditto." 

ACTING Chief of Police Biggy has made another raid 
on Chinatown. How these laundrymen love one 
another. 

THE superlative ejaculation in Great Britain just 
at present is, "it beats the Dutch." 



M 



January ao, 1900. 



SAN I - T.FTTKR. 



'3 







ft CHERRY floor needs but two coats of shellac, the 
wood nut being as porous as oak, and it should be 
waxed once in three weeks, rubbed with the brush once a 
week and frequently washed with turpentine. In fact, a 
cherry floor demands twice as much labor to keep it look- 
ing well as oak. 

No hard-wood floor, except in a hall, bathroom or 
kitchen, need be swept more frequently than once a week, 
though the covered broom must be used, as the coarse 
broom straws wear away the wax, marring the lustre of 
the polished surface. 

For library, hall and reception room, cherry is really 
preferable over the other woods of moderate cost. 
Mahogany furniture harmonizes perfectly and the floor re- 
flects every object so beautifully. 

Stairways when uDcarpeted should be constructed as to 
the treads, of oak, maple, birdseye maple or birch; cherry 
wears off too quickly. Stairs should always be shellacked, 
as it is so easily renewed, sometimes one coat spring and 
fall sufficing. Anyone can do this with a small flat paint 
brush. Use white, but after the cherry grows dark the 
colored shellac is best. To brighten the stairs rub them 
with a mixture half of turpentine and half of boiled linseed 
oil. Any shellacked surface can be rubbed with this, 
though care must be taken to keep the proportions exact; 
too much oil leaves a sticky surface and the floor is nearly 
ruined. 

Birch floors are more and more extensively used. Many 
of us get strips of birch flooring in our cherry floors; few 
people know the difference, sometimes the builders them- 
selves. Birch never grows dark and rich looking, but 
remain? light. Nothing but white shellac can be used on 
birch, for it plainly shows when it wears off. Unless kiln- 
dried for weeks and then laid immediately it shrinks to an 
alarming extent. Birch floors must be varnished. 

Yellow is the reflecting color and keynote for all dark 
rooms. In a word, a north light requires a red; a north- 
east, orange yellow; east, yellow; southeast, greenish 
yellow; west, yellow, and northwest, orange yellow. This 
is a boxiDgof the compass from a color point of view. 

New floor finishes are constantly being put upon the 
market, such as gutta percha, etc., but have not been 
properly tested as yet by the effect of time; they all look 
well at first Varnished floors should never be mopped or 
washed with soap; water with a little ammonia is all that 
can ever be used. 

Maple is used for floors, but must be varnished. When 
oiled it is spotted by grease, being porous, and is rather 
too light-colored unless a color is added to the filler. A 
light color is objectionable, giving a room an unfurnished, 
unfinished, raw look. Maple does not take kindly to 
staining. For stained floors pine, spruce or other soft 
woods, is preferable. 

A varnish which will wear on any floor longer than six 
months is hard to find. All varnished or shellacked floors 
to be properly treated should be sand-papered previous to 
recoating with varnish, but few painters can be found 
willing to do this of their own accord unless specially 
directed to do so. The reason for the sand-papering is 
that all unevenness and inequalities of surface are readily 
perceptible after the fresh varnish is applied unless well 
sand-papered. 

Birch does not stain or mar, being an extremely hard- 
wood with even surface. 

PARKER'S COUGH CURE. 
A Sovereign Remedy. One dose will atop a cougb. It never fails. 
Try it. Price, 25 fients. George Dahlbendee & Co., 214 Kearny 
street. For sale by all druggists. 



Creme de Lis removes all traces of sallowness and other facial blemishes. 
Prevents tan, sunburn, and poison oak. Erases the lines that years of nee- 
jeot have made In the face by keeping the skin taut, smooth and white. 




14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



January 20, 1900. 




Prom all the leading fields in the south- 
Strikes of Oil Are era portion of the State oil strikes are 
Now Common, being reported, and the work of devel- 
opment is proceeding with more activ- 
ity than ever, even if business on the Exchanges is rather 
quiet for the time beiDg. The latest strike reported is at 
Caribou, where oil is now coming in as drilling proceeds, 
although so far the oil sand has not been reached. This, 
however, cannot be far away, judging from indications, 
and a flowing well is confidently expected within the next 
week or so. The Home declared another dividend during 
the week of ten cents per share, amounting to $10,000, 
besides carrying over a balance of $5,000 into the treasury. 
A number of other companies are also paying regular 
monthly dividends, the majority of which are at the rate 
of 25 per cent, per annum. This is an inducement for in- 
vestment, when it is recollected that the life of a good 
well is long, some in the southern portion of the State 
having already a record of twenty years active produc- 
tion. When people of means get better acquainted with 
the true merits of the oil industry, and the opportunities 
it affords for the lucrative investment of money, there 
will be an abundance of capital at the command of all well 
managed companies. Of course stocks will not likely be 
as cheap in the future as they are at present. It is not to be 
effected that shares in a producing company can be bought 
at the same prioe as they were quoted at when the ground 
was practically undeveloped. When wells are flowing the 
value will be based upon the annual profits, more or less, 
as the case may be. There has never been any lack of 
capital for investment in the fields of Pennsylvania or the 
other sources of the world's oil supply, and it is idle to 
dream that California will prove singular in this respect 
when the vast proportions of the future output of her 
wells is taken into consideration. Of course this is a slow 
place to draw capital for any legitimate venture in a 
business, although no end of money can be raised during 
the present epoch at a moment's notice to back a prize- 
fight or some other abomination, not to speak of the 
thousands of dollars which are squandered monthly in lot- 
teries. However, times are changing, fortunately, in this 
respect, and an improvement can be confidently looked 
forward to in the future with the introduction of better 
and more modern methods of business in the community. 

The management of the Florence Oil De- 

The Florence to velopment and Exploiting Company is 

Drill For Oil. about to begin active development work 

on its property, which adjoins that of 
the Esperanza Company. Drilling will be started uu as 
soon as possible, so as to put the company on a produc- 
tive basis. During the past week, Dawson Meyer, Vice- 
President, Simon Donau, Treasurer, and F. MacPherson, 
Secretary, accompanied by F. de Miranda, the oil expert', 
visited the ground to make preliminary arrangements for 
beginning work. The Esperanza, adjoining, has a well 
down some 600 feet, with good prospects for oil. Consid- 
erable development work is now going on in the Kettleman 
Hills, where these properties are located, and strikes are 
expected in the near future. 

A vigorous protest is made in London 
The White Pass against the manner in which the manage- 
RaHroad. ment of the White Pass and Yukon Rail- 
way is acting toward the smaller share- 
holders. This road according to all that can be learned, 
most of the information being based simply upon estimates! 
owing to the meagre details afforded by the chairman at 
the meeting recently held in London, pays exceedingly 
handsome returns. The gentleman was either unable or 
unwilling to throw any light upon the cost of operation 
except in a vague and general way, which left his audi- 
ence about as wise when he got through as they were be- 
fore he began. The complaint seems to be that although 
the road is accredited with clearing up a profit of $700,000 
in five months since it opened up for business, the directors 
could not see fit to pay out any portion of this in dividends 
carrying the total amount forward to construction ac- 



count. This was done, it is claimed, through the influence 
of contractors, who with their friends own eighty-six per 
cent, of the capital stock, and of course control the 
directors. The remaining fourteen per cent, of the stock- 
holders, who do not like this, naturally enough, contend 
that the directors should consider the stockholders first 
before the contractors, in view of such a flourishing con- 
dition of the treasury, and have allowed them a fair rate 
of interest on the money invested. These people are gen- 
erally of small means, who took stock in the concern origi- 
nally with the hope that it would pay better returns than 
they could get elsewhere. That their judgment was cor- 
rect is proven by the immense earnings of the road ever 
since it started, but as they happen to be in an apparently 
hopeless minority, all that remains for them is to grin and 
bear their disappointment. From the fact of these large 
earnings, and that the road has already contracted for 
hauling 12,000 tons of freight during January, February, 
March and April, at rates which clear over $736,000 to the 
Summit only, it certainly does seem that a dividend could 
have been paid without much difficulty. However, the 
minority must recognize that it is the under dog in this 
case, and be prepared to receive with becoming humility 
and gratitude any crumbs that may be thrown in their 
direction after the contractors are fattened up. 

It is interesting as well as instruct- 
A Case Where jye to review the different estimates 
the Doctors Differ, of "the annual gold production of Cal- 
ifornia. Interesting, as additional 
evidence to show how widely statisticians can differ, and 
instructive to the extent of showing that as a source of 
information the Mint authorities are about as reliable in the 
matter of this particular data as the Department of Ag- 
riculture usually is in its estimates of the wheat crop. Ac- 
cepting the report of Mr. J. J. Valentine, President of 
Wells Fargo & Company as a more correct basis of 
information, for the reason that the data is formulated 
from receipts of metals actually handled, we find that the 
yield of gold dust and bullion amounts to $15,364,498. In 
addition to this there is a return in this report of $3,246,- 
315 accredited to ores and base bullion by freight. Of 
this a large proportion Is undoubtedly gold. Allowing only 
a ratio of one-third, which can be accepted as a low esti- 
mate for California ores of this character, the Valentine 
estimate of the total gold yield would amount to in the 
neighborhood of $16,446,603. Even then this can be con- 
sidered below the mark, as a large amount of gold passes 
through private channels which never enters into account 
with either the Mint or the express company. The su- 
perintendent of the local branch of the Mint figures the 
gold yield of the State at $15,000,000 in round numbers, 
the same amount being reported by the United States 
Director of the Mint, Roberts. The local Federal author- 
ity says the silver yield of the State amounted to $636,- 
000; the Director of the Mint says it was $1,396,363, and 
Mr, Valentine says $315,304. So much for figures. In 
view of these different opinions, exception can safely be 
taken to the official statement that the Klondike annual 
gold yield, estimated at $16,110,129 for the year, eclipses 
that of California by about $1,000,000. It certainly does 
if the returns from this particular quarter are correct, in- 
stead of being viewed simply in the light of a calculation 
upon a highly conservative scale, by one who was desirous 
of keeping well within, rather than overshoot the mark 
The very differences apparent between these estimates, 
combined with the knowledge that even at the best a large 
proportion of the gold extracted escapes official notice, 
are, however, sufficient to warrant the belief that the 
annual yield of California is not much below $20,000,000 
while on the other hand it is safe to assume that the Klon- 
dike output has been stretched to the fullest possible 
limit. 

The Scottish Californian Mining Syndi- 
More Scotch Gold cate, Limited, was incorporated at 
Coming Here. Edinburgh last month with a capital of 
$50,000, to work a Tuolumne County 
mine, the vendors of which are Robert Milligan and John 
MacCullum. The directors named so far are J. H. Dal- 
ziel, M. P., W. Gillies and R. Mickel, of Glasgow. The 
name of the property is not mentioned, but it is possi- 
bly the Little Wonder mine at Big Oak Flat. 



January 20, 1900. 



s\N FRANi [SCO NEWS LETTER. 



«5 



Last month public record shows that tw< 
The Profits nine American mines paid dividends ftffgrv- 
Of Mining. K» lm « ♦">. l">-.7 In. segregated as to 
California, six mines, $70,800; Dtati 
' Colorado, seventeen mines. 1971,660; 
ma, three mines, $1,665,000: Idaho, two n 
181,000; Michigan, two mines, $2,639,000; Washington, 
■HO, and British Columbia, two mines, 
0. In Colorado, Stratton's Independence is accred- 
ited with a payment of $488,000, and the Gold Coin with 
*1'mp,i>00. The total of Montana is swelled by the distri- 
bution of $1,500,000 by the Amalgamated Copper Com- 
pany. In Michigan the Calumit and Hecla divided among 
its shareholders for the month $2,000,000, the Osceola paid 
■I'K), and the Tamarack $360,000. The largest pay- 
ments in California were made by the Argonaut and the 
Yellow Aster, each of which disbursed $20,000. In addi- 
tion, four California quicksilver mines can be credited 
with payments aggregating $65,000. 



FOLLOWING are the transactions on the Stock and 
Bond Exchange for the week beginning January ll'th 
and ending January Hth : 



. 

Mnrkrt St. I.l Com 
Mort'i 

N..r Rj 
N P • 
Oftklftli'l < r 



MIS! i IKINIpm 

I.nno <a wft 



9.<n><4 i»i , 

»j00O@ 117 US 

- ■•■> > n.t in 

7. '"I 4 lmi 
* II! 



Oceanic K 1- »< .-.'■■' I 



Watkr. Stmrcs. 

OvnUmOosta w.iior... in 

Spriin Valley Water. 711 

Oah and Electric. 

BqultabtaGas 50 

I'.i.iilc Llshtlne CO 

PftciHo Git* Imy'v'nL 5 

Oakland Gas.. GO 

Gob and Eleotric 856 

SFGas 2730 

Banks. 



.>i,,i,ii..,.i ,u,.nV. i.mi(i i 

I'Krk AOHTItyOV. 5.000 « 

8 K N P»\ 10.000 i n 

Sii-lra Hy 

-i PA *.l V l(> 

SI' ..I Ariz. .11110%. 1J.000 5 

S I" Urolith tS 0,0000 

s V W \\ 

S V \V \l 

mow) 3% III.UUOG 

BTOOX8, 

LPfll sroAR Stocks. Shares. 
110 



™# '• l Hans P Co 

«!4 «3>3 Hawaiian C & S Co... 111! 

Honakan 420 

5 5 Hutchinson IS5 

41 iOKKllauea 50 

46>4 <6H Mokaivell HE 

43)4 43 Onomea US 

52 50ii Panuhnu S PI Co 066 

4% 4 Powders. 

Giant 135 




— Stbanoeb — Doctor, I ache all over. Doctor — 
Malaria, probably. Stranger — And my head is all 
stuffed up, and I have a tearing cough. Doctor — A little 

cold along with it, I see. Take Stranger— And I 

just feel as if this blankety-blank world was a rip-roaring 
old fraud, and I'd like to throw that miserable old grinning 
moon at the sun and stuff all the stars down somebody's 
throat. Doctor — By Jovel You've got the grip. 



Bank of California 20 401% «1% „ 

Cal'f Safe Deposit 10 97 97 Mischllankoos. 

Street Railroads. Alaska Packers I". 

MnrketStreet 375 62 01% Oceanic S S Co 535 



119% 
9-1 



'$! 



The transactions for the week amount to 8,608 shares and 158,000 bonds as 
OKainst 11.085 shares and 193,350 bonds of the previous week. 

During: the week there has been little action in any of the stocks. Sprint? 
Valley was heavily traded in at rieures rangrinc between 9:iVa and 95J4. 
Oceanic went up to 04 to-day. The annual meeting: will take pliioe on Jan. 
22at. Gas and Electric stocks were little traded in with the P. T. V. 



— They were husband and wife. The house was being 
repaired, and they were staying, he at his club, she, be- 
ing up to date, at her club. What made the big porter 
at the Monico smile to himself was that when he had put 
her into her carriage, and before he got in himself, the 
husband loudly asked her: "Darling, where do you live?" 

The time is rife to have your carpets taken up and made clean and 
new. Nothing ao dangerous to health and appearances as unclean 
carpets. The 8panlding Carpet Cleaning Works, 353 Tehama street, 
employs expert artisans and uses special machinery. Quick work 
and easy prices. 



—A figure of a million: Smirk — Who is that girl? 
Quirk — That's Miss Oof; she's worth a cool million. 
Smirk — We-'l, her face is nothing out of the ordinary, but 
she's got a splendid figure. 

When the morning's work has given you a razor-edged appetite, a 
good place to lose it is the GTand Hotel Cafe, which is newly reno- 
vated, and whose proprietors, Fay & Foster, make a specialty of 
merchants' luncheon from. 11 to 2. 



Do you know that Smith's Dandruff Pomade has cured thousands 
of cases of dandruff, itchiug scalp, eczema. and falling hair when all 
other remedies have failed? Price 50c at all druggists. Sample Free. 
Address Smith Bros., Fresno. Cal. 



Jbe California 3tapdard Oil fompaqy 

ar;d . . . 

Jfye Qiapt Oil ^ompapy 



OFHCbS OF THE COMPANIES: 



After six months' work at McKittrick, are producing oil 
from their first well at the rate of 150 to 200 barrels per 
day, and shipping a carload per day to their consumers. 
1300 acres are controlled by these companies, and 3 
Standard Rigs are in operation night and day drilling 
other wells. Land U. S. Patent. 

Subscriptions for stock now being received at $1 per 
share. 

A DIVIDEND of 7 per cent, on this figure could be 
paid to-day were it not for the fact that the income from 
the sale of oil is being used for further development. 

What will this stock be worth wiien 20 such wells are 
producing ? 



0&*' 



ROOM 16, 2d FLOOR MILLS BUILDING. 
460 and 462 EIGHTH STREET, Oakland. 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEB. January 20, 1900. 

IN THE: WORLD OF INSURANCE . 



THE OLD AND NEW IN THE FIREMANS FUND. 

DJ. STAPLES, the retired President of the Kiremans 
, Fund, was born in Massachusetts in 1824. He came 
to California in 1849. In 1860 he was delegate to the con- 
vention which elected Lincoln. In 1866 he became Vice- 
President and Manager of the Firemans Fund, and in 
1867 its President. After 34 years of uninterrupted ser- 
vice in the behalf of the company he elected to retire upon 
his well-earned laurels. He has been, at all times, a fea- 
ture in underwriting circles upon the Coast, and the trib- 
ute paid to him on Wednesday, when the new officers of the 
corporation were elected, was filled with as much sincerity 
as sentiment. His fellow officers and the employees of the 
corporation presented him with a testimonial of their re- 
spect and regard which is valuable in itself as a' memento 
of the good wishes that accompanied it — a specially de- 
signed album bound in green morocco, with a handsomely 
engraved testimonial title page, containing the photo- 
graphs of all the employees of the company. It was a del- 
icate tribute, and gracefully received. 

Mr. W. J. Dutton, who has heretofore been the First 
Vice-President of the company, now succeeds Mr. Staples 
as the President, a well merited and earned promotion. 
Mr. Dutton was born in 1847, and his father was one of 
the pioneers of California and an incorporator of the Fire- 
mans Fund, and served as its Vice-President. Mr. But- 
ton's earlier education in insurance was in the office of 
the North British and Mercantile, and he entered the office 
of the company of which he is now President 33 years ago 
as marine clerk. In 1869 Mr. Dutton was appointed marine 
secretary. In 1890 he was elected Vice-President. Mr. 
Dutton is not alone a fire underwriter, but is equally well 
versed in the intricacies of marine insurance, and from his 
wide range of experience will unquestionably manage the 
affairs of the Firemans Fund successfully and ably. 

Mr. Bernard Faymonville was elected first vice-presi- 
dent and succeeds Mr. Dutton. Mr. Faymonville was 
born in Illinois, and came to California in 1877, living in 
Fresno, where he secured the agency of the Firemans 
Fund, by which company he was appointed local agent in 
1871, assistant agent in 1887, secretary in 1890, and sec- 
ond vice-president in 1893. Through his ability he has 
now climbed another round of the ladder. 

J. B. Levison has been promoted to the position of sec- 
ond vice-president and marine secretary, he having dis- 
charged the duties of the latter position for a number of 
years, and is now and has been long recognized as among 
the leading marine underwriters of the United States. 

The new secretary of the Firemans Fund, who has held 
the office of assistant secretary, is Louis Weinmann, than 
which there is no more popular or better known young 
man among the fire underwriters of the State. He was 
born at Benicia in 1853, was local agent of the Firemans 
Fund at that point from 1881 to 1888, was appointed spec- 
ial agent in July, 1888, and assistant secretary of the com- 
pany in January, 1892, since which time he has acquired 
the reputation of a skilled and able underwriter, and now 
has been elected to fill the chair of secretary. He is the 
author of several papers of value on fire underwriting 
topics, is a well-known club-man, and popular alike with 
his co-workers and competitors. A rather peculiar 
coincidence of this movement up along the line of the offi- 
cers of California's largest fire insurance company, is that 
each of the officers has won his way by continued services, 
and earned his promotion by merit, and it is safe to pre- 
sume that each of the new officers will accord to his fel- 
lows a due share of credit in having done his part to build 
the Firemans Fund to the proud position which the com- 
pany now occupies as one of the leading American Fire 
companies. F. W. Lougee was re-elected Treasurer and 
I. D. Ives General Agent. 

It closed the year with gross assets of $3,884,331.08, and 
with the grand surplus to policyholders of $2,312,720 64. 



dently going to outlive the rumor in spite, since it has just 
declared a three per cent dividend, as well as carrying a 
handsome sum to reserve. 

The figures that the Home Fire Insurance Company of 
New York are reported to have telegraphed to the Insur- 
ance Department of California, we learn were not ac- 
cepted by Commissioner Clunie. What is the matter? In 
this case the News Letter is willing to wager a dough- 
nut against a last year bird nest that Clunie for once is 
right. 

The California Insurance Company on the 15th re-elected 
its old board of directors and officers to serve for another 
year: L. L. Bromwell, President; J. R. Spring, Vice- 
President; Daniel Meyer, Treasurer; and J. H. Anderson, 
Secretary. 

H. W. Fores, adjuster for the Transatlantic leaves for 
an extended Southern trip this week. 

The American and the St. Paul Insurance Companies. 
Major Charles Christensen Manager, will remove from 317 
California street to more commodious offices at 220 San- 
some street prior to the 1st prox. 

T. D. Bbardman, who has been acting as special agent 
of the .(Etna Fire Insurance Company, has resigned to go 
into the real estate business. . 

Bernard Faymonville, First Vice-President of the Fire- 
man's Fund, leaves for the East next week. 

The thirty-seventh annual meeting of the stockholders 
of the Firemans Fund Insurance Company was held in the 
company's building on the 16th. The company's "Burgee" 
flew from the flag-pole, and the friends of the company 
gathered in the office of the President and enjoyed the 
champagne luncheon which it is the company's regular 
custom to offer at each anniversary of its incorporation. 

That ancient and honorable organization known as the 
United Workmen has raised a novel point in defense of 
its non-payment of a certificate of life insurance on the 
life of a deceased member who died without the services of 
a physician. The member was a Christian Scientist — 
whatever that may be — and died relying on his theory; 
and now his estate cannot give a physician's certificate as 
to the cause of his death, which is required by this dis- 
order. The body is to be exhumed and a certificate 
given by the physicians who are employed. Meanwhile 
one wonders what kind of insurance a man will take who 
is fool enough at one and the same time to trust the two 
combined chimeras of Christian Science and the United 
Workmen. 

The insurance men along the street — all good fellows 
and gentlemen, every one — feel that in the retirement 
from active underwriting circles of D. J. Staples, Presi- 
dent of the Firemans Fund, they have lost a man who has 
for over a quarter of a century represented all that is 
best in the correct practice of the profession, that some- 
thing more is due than mere good wishes, regrets or con- 
gratulations, and so have as a delicate tribute arranged 
for a dinner such as only fire insurance men can give. The 
date is next Wednesday. It is understood that it will be 
given at one of the leading clubs, and that it will be an 
underwriter affair — a feast of reason and a flow of 



^California's ratio of losses to premiums paid since 1875: 



For the year 1875 28.3 

For the year 1876 32.2 

For the year 1877 31.0 

For the year 1878 26.3 

For the year 1879 32.5 

For the year 1880 32 5 

For the year 1881 33.3 

For the year 1882 39.9 

For the year 1883 39.1 

For the year 1884 28.5 

For the year 1885 44.8 

For the year 1886 61.2 



THAT Wandering Jew of a rumor which has returned 
without fail to San Francisco every January for the 
last fifteen years, has again "rumored." "The Lion is going 
to reinsure in the Imperia land withdraw. " The Lion is evi- 



For the year 1887 37.6 

For the year 1888 50.1 

For the year 1889 41.7 

For the year 1890 43.7 

For the year 1891 . 36.1 

For the year 1892 38.9 

For the year 1893 394 

For the year 1894 44 4 

For the year 1895 60.6 

For the year 1896 69 3 

For the year 1897 56.3 

For the year 1898 63 8 

For the year 1899 52.1 

The year ending December 31st, 1899, was a fairly good 
year for fire insurance companies, according to the aver- 
age loss ratio to premiums, which for all practical pur- 
poses can be estimated at 50 per cent. The foreign com- 
panies as a class in contradistinction to the American com- 
panies apparently have established a slightly less loss 
ratio to premiums paid than have the American companies. 



January 10, 1900. 

First on the list in point of busi- 
ness done is the Firemans Fund, re- 
porting premiums of (204.142, with a 
loss ratio of 42 t>. Of this amount 
o»er $61,307 in premiums was se- 
cured from San Francisco alone. 

The Hartford of Hartford, H. K. 
Belden, manager, secured from Cali- 
fornia $118,571 in premiums, of which 
$48,158 was received from San Fran- 
cisco, loss ratio of 40.2. 

The German-American, George H. 
Tyson, manager, secured $155,141 in 
premiums and $35,365 from San 
Franoisco, with a loss ratio of 47 0. 

The Home Mutual wrote $133,975 
with $13,581 from San Francisco, with 
a loss ratio of 56.9. 

The .Etna, Boardman & Spencer, 
managers, wrote $130,898 in Cali- 
fornia, of which $32,338 was received 
from San Francisco, and established 
a loss ratio of 46.5. 

The Pennsylvania, T. Edward Pope, 
manager, wrote $104,059 in Cali- 
fornia, of which $15,722 was San 
Francisco business, and established a 
loss ratio of 59.2. 

The Phoenix of Hartford, Herbert 
Folger, manager, wrote $102,413, of 
which $23,762 was secured from San 
Francisco, and exceeded the average 
loss ratio of the State, establishing 
their figures at 63.4. 

The Girard of Philadelphia, W. O. 
Wayman, manager, had the lowest loss 
ratio, 15, of any company reporting 
to the Commissioner. While the 
highest loss ratio reported is that by 
the Phoenix of Brooklyn, 133, to 
which figures, however, there is an 
explanation in justice to the manager. 
The figures included a large amount 
of losses upon old business. 

The largest business written in the 
city was that of the Firemans Fund, 
and the smallest was the Merchants' 
of Rhode Island. 

The Insurance Company of North 
America, James D. Bailey, manager, 
secured $84,174, of which $14,281 was 
from San Francisco, with a loss ratio 
of 56.9. 

Amongst foreign companies, as 
usual, the London and Lancashire, 
Wm. MacDonald, manager, led 
the list with $187,823 in premiums, of 
which $94,293 was secured from San 
Francisco premium payers, with the 
magnifioent low loss ratio of 39.9, A 
close second is the Liverpool and 
London and Globe, Charles D. Haven, 
manager, $184,742 in premiums, of 
which $52,993 is San Francisco busi- 
ness, and the loss ratio is 61. 

The Thuringia, Voss, Conrad & Co., 
managers, secured $162,073 in prem- 
iums, of which $77,485 was from San 
Francisco, with a loss ratio of 47.9. 

The Royal, Rolla V. Watt, wrote 
$146,732, of which $50,015 was from 
San Francisco, with a loss ratio of 
61.5. 

The Norwich Union, W. H. Lowden, 
wrote $101,970, of which almost 
$34,000 was from San Francisco, with 
a loss ratio of 45. 

The Commercial Union, C. F. Mul- 
lins, manager, wrote $106,397, of 
which $40,118 was from San Fran- 
cisco, and a loss ratio of 35.1. 

The London and Northern, George 



BAN 1 i WCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

F. Grant, manager, secured $11: 
of premiums, of which almost $53,000 
was from San Francisco, with a loss 
ratio of 52.6, 

The Royal Exchange, Frank W. 
Dickson, manager, wrote $107,265 
and secured over $53,000 of the same 

CALIFORNIA ITRE BU8INF8S FOR 1899. 



«7 

from San Francisco, with a loss ratio 
of 48. 

The Palatine, Charles A. Laton, 
manager, wrote close to three figures, 
or over $06,000, of which one-third of 
it was secured from San Francisco, 
with a splendid loss ratio of 23.6. 



Company. 



Agent. 



CALIFORNIA COMI'WIl 



San 

Premium*. 



Amount 
Written. 



Losses 

Premium*. Paid. Ratio 



Firemans Fund Bcreanl Faymonvlll* 8 

Home Mutual Stephen I). Ives 

Totals S 

6 County Mutuals 



13.581 






8 291.112 .-■ il'-. 

188,874 76 



74,888 8 27,980.870 ? .128,116 8 301,6m «.8 
395,167 1.496 



FOREIGN COMPANIES. 



Aachen & Munich 

Alliance ... 

Atlas 

Baloisc 

British America 

Caledonian 

Commercial Union 

Hamburg-Bremen 

Helvetia Swiss 

Imperial ,. . . . 

I .ancash ire 

Lion ... 

Liverpool & London & GIbhc. 

London and Northern 

London & Lancashire 

Law Union S: Crown . 

Magdeburg 

Manchester 

New Zealand 

North British 

North German 

Norwich Union 

Palatine .... 

Phoenix .. . 

Prussian National 

Royal 

Royal Exchange 

Scottish Union & National 

State 

Sun Insurance Office 

Svea 

Transatlantic 

Thuringia 

Union 

Western 



Cesar Rertheau 8 

C K. Mullins 

F.J. Devlin 

Syz & Co 

Davis & Watson 

L. B. Edwards 

C. F. Mullins 

R. Herol.l, jr 

Syz ri Co 

W. J Landers 

Matin 8; Wilson 

W. J, Landers 

Chas. D. Haven 

Geo. F. Grant 

Wm. Macdonald 

Catton. Bell & Co .... 

Gutte & Frank 

L. B. Edwards 

W. P. Thomas 

Tom C. Grant 

Walter Speyer 

W. H. Lowden 

Chas. A. Laton 

ButlerlSt Haldan 

W. Loaiza & Co 

Rolla V. Watt 

Frank Dickson 

R. C. Medcraft 

Win. Macdonald 

I. B. F. Davis & Son. 
Edward Brown KcSoiis. 

V. C. Driffield 

Voss, Conrad & Co 
Catton, Bell & Co ... 
Davis & Watson 



:'.".7M; 
26.816 
7.21S 
is.:,::j 
14.180 
10,118 
57,085 
21.866 
2S.62S 

89,955 
15.198 

52.933 
52,985 
94,292 
11,054 

28,902 
23,787 
14,181 
30,147 
58,075 
88,961 
32,592 

34,309 
17,964 
50,01f> 
53,241 
22,861 
2,623 
211,011 
17,710 
60,009 
77,184 
23,154 
16,191 



5,569,801 
5,015,158 
6.883,6.54 

887.225 
2,255,615 
8,667,797 

7.i;::n.872 

6,173,288 
2.730,011 
4,960,708 
5,972,228 
2,013,468 

15,088,746 
8,207,948 

13.HW.S04 
2,301,840 
1,140,216 
5,106.015 
3.015,391 
6,258,841 
6,500.050 
6.489,103 
5,897,959 
6,392,693 
3,007,010 
9,899,685 
7,945,522 
5,188,340 
433,890 
4,475,598 
4,718.195 
6,898,321 

11,931,860 
4,620,368 
3,492,024 



85,429 
69.960 
90.527 
10,848 
87,548 
50,272 
106,397 
91,908 
84,682 
74.018 
85,521 
41.493 
184.842 
112.371 
187,828 
28,752 
57,258 
77,797 
41,564 
95.389 
91,523 
101,970 
96,180 
90,041 
40.217 
146,731 
107,264 
71,408 
4, 4 38 
67,171 
90,769 
98,329 
162,072 
58,781 
52,217 



61,197 71.0 

6,558 9.3 

62,858 69.1 

4,652 41.9 

16,669 41.7 

30,011 64.0 

37.1:;:; 35.1 

86,880 39.5 

10,894 80.0 

40.421'. 62.2 

17.250 55.2 

28.729 09.2 
1 12.839 01.0 

58.988 52.4 

74,98] 39.8 

13,228 40.0 

44,998 "s.5 

18,588 02.1 

82,448 78.1 

39.930 41.8 

18.730 20.4 
15,879 44.9 
22.090 23 
4S.841 54.2 
21,488 53.1 
90,233 61.4 
51,463 47.9 
27,054 37.8 



58,504 87.0 

58,737 64.7 

53,739 f.4.6" 

77,021 47.8 

42,384 "2.0 

14,977 28.6 



Totals 81,158,677 S199,78&,416 »2,849,375 81,461,477 60.9 

COMPANIES OF OTHER STATES. 

/Etna Boardman St Spencer 8 32,338 

Agricultural Edward Brown ccSuns. 10,209 

American, N. J L.B.Edward 6,065 

American, Boston Baggs & Stovel 7,879 

American Central Chas. Christensen 10,322 

American, Pa Edward Brown clcSons. 16,788 

American, N. Y L.B.Edwards 9,786 

Assurance Co. of America W.S.Davis 1,125 

Boston Marine... Geo. H. Tyson 3,092 

Caledonean American t. D. Maxwell Co 1,290 

Connecticut Benj.J. Smith 14,075 

Continental J. D. Maxwell Co 35,991 

Commercial Union C. F. Mullins 1,272 

Equitable Bernard Faymonwlle. 2,436 

Fire Association T. C. Shanklin 12,088 

Franklin E E. Potter 10,419 

Girard G. W. McNear 3,090 

German American Geo. H. Tyson 85,301 

Greenwich Tom C. Grant 11.392 

Hanover '• Cesar Bertheau 21,586 

Hartford H. K. Belden 18,158 

Home H. L. Roll 45.1-1 

Ins. Co. of North America las. D. Bailey 11,281 

Ins. Co. State of Penn Bernard Faymonville. 1,967 

Kings County F.J.Devlin 804 

Mercantile, Boston Baggs & Stovel 5,887 

Merchants, N. J G.W. McNear 14,361 

Milwaukee Mechanics L. L. Bromwell 25,056 

Merchants, R. 1 Bernard Faymonville. 672 

Magdeburg Gutte 8c Frank ,2,143 

National Geo. D. Dornin 17.840 

National Standard W.S.Davis 908 

Niagara. W. Loaiza & Co 15,459 

Northwestern National G. W. Turner 13,252 

Norwatk Wm. Macdonald . ... 4,448 

North German Walter Speyer 2,182 

North British Tom C. Grant 

Orient Frank Dickson 5,198 

Phcenix, Hartford Herbert Folger 23,761 

Pennsylvania T. Edw. Pope 15,722 

Providence Wellington Butler & Haldan .... 9,169 

Pelican Butler & Haldan 2,911 

Phenix of Brooklyn H. McD. Spencer 5,518 

Queen Rolla V. Watt 15,371 

Springfield Geo. D. Dornin 10.002 

St. Paul Chas. Christensen 8,367 

'Thuringia-American Voss. Conrad & Co ... . 10,080 

Traders Chas. A. Laton. ..:. .. 5,259 

Teutonia Manure Wilson 10,484 

Union T. Edw. Pope 3,733 

United States Geb. W. McNear ... 4,451 

Victoria Catton.Bell Sc Co .... 1,910 

Westchester ■ M.O.Brown 22,501 

Williamsburg City.. E.E.Potter 8,500 

Totals 8 628,503 8153,023,310 82,311,220 81,280,649 54.0 



9,070,567 ! 


i 130,898 8 


60,858 


46.4 


1,114,676 


23,391 


9,512 


40,6 


1,999.421 


33,758 


17,226 


.'.1.0 


897,723 


13,147 


3,006 


22.S 


2,321,644 


33,398 


14,080 


44.8 


3.574,049 


02,190 


20,10,8 


41.9 


1,752,358 


21,982 


8,348 


31.8 


170,100 


2,122 






814,533 


12,692 


7,613 


110. 1 


83,532 


1,290 






4,951,077 


75,113 


50,720 


67.1) 


9,008,031 


120>6 


47,260 


89.2 


310,205 


3,011 


4 




1,074,230 


18,797 


, 8,886 


47.2 


2,072,998 


39,271 


41,0113 104.4 


4,367,581 


63,101 


21,388 


33.8 


809,448 


10,190 


1,527 


14.9 


9,937,116 


155,140 


74,412 


47.9 


1,458,657 


24.685 


12 991 


52.6 


3,092,775 


47.332 


30,342 


7li.V 


13,471,669 


188.570 


92,854 


49 2 


9,785,858 


190,420 


162,811 


8b.b 


6,184,327 


90,750 


57,597 


03.5 


889,086 


10,386 


7,110 


43.1 


196,120 


1,658 






643,071 


9,100 


3,600 


39.5 


3,315,217 


48,038 


26,648 


:i.').l 


6,988,732 


90,937 


02,578 


68.8 


181,815 


8,755 


3,012 


81.0 


328,297 


4,122 


3,570 


HI,., 


4,214,408 


71,214 


30,840 


42.0 


116,925 


1,069 






1,843,012 


27,312 


9,158 


38.0 


6,195.619 


77,616 


41,585 


53.5 


513,964 


7,000 


1,413 


20.1 


328,472 


4,075 


1 




1,161,630 


19,258 


15,013 


77.9 


0,401,747 


102,413 


61,980 


63.4 


5,471,344 


104,059 


61,621 


59.2 


1,805,404 


27,431 


14,761 


53.8 


513,067 


7,020 


2.0S1 


38.1 


921,710 


15.521 


20,642 132.9 


1,021,017 


00.380 


42,708 


70.7 


3,1117,102 


50,860 


26,694 


52.0 


2,015,775 


31,528 


12,998 


41.2 


1,496,479 


20 332 


10,245 


50.4 



9011.781 
1,422,487 
1,020,956 
983,085 
338.428 
2,704.803 
0,572,^10 



21,755 
18,041 
13,430 
1,503 
50,702 
51,447 



2,858 22.3 

11,008 50.0: 

10,561 58.5 

4,032 30 



22,509 44.3 
12,801 23.5 



i8 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 20, 1900. 



SUMMARY OF FIFTY-FIFTH ANNUAL REPORT of the y 

New=York Life Insurance Company 



New Insurance paid for in 1899 $202,309,080 



JOHN A. McCALL, President 



TOTAL ASSETS 

$236,450,348 



NET GAIN IN INSURANCE IN FORCE 

$117,850,865 



•TOTAL PAID-FOR INSURANCE IN FORCE JAN. 1. 1900 



$1,061,871,985 



Total New Premiums including Dividends " 
applied by policyholders to purchase New 
Insurance, and deducting amount paid to \ 
other companies for re-insurance on NEW j 
policies in this Company J 

Annuities 



Renewal Premiums less amount paid to other } 
companies for re-insurance on policies in V 
this Company ) 

Interest, Rents, etc., plus Deposit on Reg- ) 
istered Bond Policy [$13,700] j 

TOTAL INCOME 



DEATH CLAIMS: 

Endowments and Annuities 

Dividends and other payments to policy-holders 
Loaned to Policy-holders during the year at ) 

5 per cent, interest j 

TOTAL TO POLICY-HOLDERS 



ASSETS 

Insurance in force January 1, 1900 
Total number of policies in force 



1898 



3,378,593 



1,322,313 



27,93 x ,742 



9,799,268 



$45,43i,9i6 



>t5, 39o,97 8 
6,128,887 

4,oi3,544 



$25,533,409 



Mi 5,944,8i 1 
944,021,120 

373,934 



1899 



$8,838,958 



1,517,929 



31,781,616 



10,232,760 



$52,371,263 



$16,022,767 
6,184,209 
4,i53,5 6 2 



$26,360,538 



$236,450,348 
1,061,871,985 

437,776 



INCREASE 



$2,460,365 



195,616 
3,849,874 



433,492 
$6,939,347 

$631,789 

55,322 

*i4o,oi8 



$827,129 



$20,505,537 

117,850,865 

63,842 



ADDITIONAL POLICY RESERVE VOLUNTARILY SET ASIDE BY THE COMPANY 

ACCUMULATED SURPLUS FUNDS, VOLUNTARILY RESERVED AND SET ASIDEBY THE " CO MP ANY,' TO 'pRbviDE'mvTDENbs'pAYABLE 
TO POLICY-HOLDERS DURING 1900, AND IN SUBSEQUENT YEARS- 
FIRST — (Payable to Policy-holders In 1900): 

To holders of Accumulation Policies, the periods of which mature in 1900 $2 178 107 

To holders of Annual Dividend Policies 694 194 

To holders of 6-Year Dividend Policies '"'""," 126384 

TOTAL IN 1900 $2 897 686 

SEC0ND.-(Payable to Policy-holders, subsequent to 1900. as the periods' mature)" 

To holders of 20-Year Period Policies 1 17 B83 264 

7,623,811 

677,637 



$3,607,699 



To holders of 15-Year Period Policies 
To holders of 10-Year Period Policies... 
To holders of 5-Year Dividend Policies.. 



279,966 



AGGREGATE. 



HOUntUHIt t?DflR9 le? 

Other Funds for all other contingencies $9066423 

THE TOTAL INCREASE In these various accounts during the year amounts to . . . $3,659,304 

PARTICULAR NOTICE. 

•1. No Policy or sum of Insurance is included in the Company's report for 18oo, as new issues or otherwise, ex- 
cept where the f.rst or renewal premium therefor, as provided in the contract, has been paid to the company in 

Cash. 

2. The rate of interest on the total amount of average invested assets was 4.64 per cent. 

3. The ratio of expenses to premium income decreased during the year. 

4. During the year the Company Placed over ssn nnn nun . _- :J ._. 



During the year the Company placed over $50,000,000 more paid-for new insurance than it did In 



898. 



TheN nwN°^ U / einSUranCeCOmPany iscom P° sed of over 400,000 policyholders who ARE the Company, who 
OWN the Company, and who ALONE receive the PROFITS of the Company. 

The Cash Dividends declared for 1900 amount to $2,897,685. The Company being a purely mutual one, every 
dollar of th.s large sum w.ll be drawn by policy-holders only during the year 1900. 
CHAS. A. McLANE, Agency Director, . . 2 d Floor Mills Building, San Francisco. 



January 20. 1900. SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 

THE GOLDEN BAIT. 



TWO Vultures sat in the snow sadly picking the last 
shreds from a human skeleton. 

" These gold-tields are not what they are cracked up to 
be," observed one. "Judging from the papers, the entire 
population of Dawson should hare starved this winter. 
Yet it strikes me that it is a long time between bites," 
and he spitefully broke the skull open with his beak to see 
if there was anything inside. 

"Yes. I admit that this country is a false alarm," ans- 
wered the other, "but it would not be so bad if it were 
not so fearfully overcrowded. Why, there are ten birds 
waiting for each job. Now, if we could eat gold " 

"Helloa ! " interrupted the other, tearing open a bag of 
nuggets, "here is a golden egg that will hatch a goose or 
two metbinks." And taking the bag in his beak he flew 
away. 

After sailing some distance through the air he observed 
two miners searching for gold, and let the bag fall be- 
tween them. As soon as they saw the shine of the con- 
tents both made a dash for it, and in the struggle that 
ensued it came to pass that they filled each other full of 
holes and died. 

Then the Wise Vulture settled down to enjoy the repast. 
But the other bird, which had followed at a distance and 
observed the success of the stratagem, came up to share 
the meal. 

And it also came to pass that when the meal was over, 
the birds fell to fighting over the possession of the golden 
bait and tore each other's gizzards out. 

M. IGNACE JAN PADEREWSKI. 

NIXE-AND -THIRTY years ago he became, in spite of 
himself, a Russia Pole inPodolia; and only three years 
later, though (or because) his circumstances were very 
unsympathetic, he played the piano. At twelve he went 
to Warsaw to learn harmony and counterpoint from 
Roguski; at eighteen he was a teacher, and a year or two 
later his talent urged him to virtue so strongly that he 
gave up everything to practice. After three hard years 
of study at Vienna he made his most successful debut; and 
though he never appeared in England until he was thirty, 
bis career was then assured as that of a great musician. 
His first appearance in Paris in 1889 encouraged him to 
come over to England; where he is now supposed to com- 
mand a thousand guineas for a piece or two. He is a Com- 
mander of the Order of the Crown of Italy; but, for the 
rest, Music is his mistress and his honors are those of 
Music. For he is now both the first of living pianists and 
a really fine composer; whose great success has been 
achieved by earnest study and incessant practice helped 
by natural ability. He has also earned nearly £40,000 by 
a single tour. 

In his own country he is the most popular of Poles; for 
his good, full heart has not been spoiled by success. He 
is also a patriotic enthusiast who spends money with un- 
failing ardor in the cause of charity: so much so that when 
he had once emptied his pockets he said: "I will go to 
America and fill them." Socially he is a charming person, 
despite his uncut hair; whom women adore: some for his 
music; some because he is the fashion, and others for 
their own foolishness. He is an indefatigable worker and 
a poet born: of whom it is scarce too much to say that he 
may be the reincarnation of Chopin. 

He must be heard before he is judged. — Jehu Junior in 
Vanity Pair. 

— Bettina — I needed a little money one day when I was 
downtown, and borrowed one dollar from Irene Foxby. I 
told her that if I forgot to return it she must ask me for 
it. Gwendolen — Yes? "Well, it escaped my mind for a 
few weeks, and the mean thing asked me for itl" 

— "Mahomet, great prophet," cried the miserable man, 
"I wish that I were dead." At that moment a brick fell 
upon him. "Oh, Mahomet," he howled, rubbing his head, 
"can't you take a measly joke?" 

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20 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 20, 1900. 



SHE KICKED IT. 

Would she do it? I wondered— she looked 

so demure. 
Would she know what I meant— If I only 

felt sure. 
The temptation was great, the occasion so 

"pat;" 
She could if she would, I was certain of that . 

1 held up my hat, it was dark in the street, 
There was no one to see her, she needn't 

retreat. 
'Twas a challenge— a challenge no girl could 

withstand, 
As I stood there before her, my hat in my 

hand. 

A moment of silence, then quickly she 
stepped 

A pace or two backward, and gracefully 
swept 

Her heavy full skirt into a handier guiae, 

With a blush and a glance from her mis- 
chievous eyes. 

Then, as I stood with my hat in the air, 
There came a quick shimmer of lingerie fair , 
From its flashing white folds a tiny shoe 

sped, 
And she kicked it — a foot or more over her 

headl 



DAUID AND 

dONATHAN. 



t^Oi? God's salce, come down to the 
\_ bank at once. David." 

Jonathan was white beneath his 
tan, but his voice was quite steady. 
"Pedro," he said, crushing the bit of 
paper in his fingers, "have you 
finished, downstairs?" 

The boy glanced up from his copy- 
ing — "Yes, sir." 

"Well, just stay about while I'm 
gone, will you?" 

His band shook as he reaohed for 
his hat. "David I" something ham- 
mered in his brain, "David I David" 
and he shivered a little as he hurried 
down the sunny street. 

A curious crowd had gathered 
around the building at the corner, and 
two rurales kept guard before the 
entrance, but they stepped aside 
promptly to let him pass. 

Jonathan halted upon the threshold 
of the inner door, and stood staring 
into the room. 

He was vaguely aware that Orimes, 
the Mexican Governor, was some- 
where in the background, with the 
manager of the Company, looking ex- 
ceedingly grave and troubled; but all 
he really saw was David, standing 
between two soldiers, with bis hands 
bound. 

He was quite calm; no trace of the 
sudden emotion which had prompted 
his message, remained. He smiled a 
little when he saw his friend, and his 
face brightened, but he did not 
speak. 

The Governor came forward. "Ah, 
SeSor,'' he said, and his eyes were 
very kind, "this is not a nice busi- 
ness." 

" What is it all about?" demanded 
Jonathan. 



" My dear young man," he replied, 
"the twelve thousand dollar brick, 
which came in yesterday from the 
mines, is gone." 

"Gonel" Jonathan echoed. "Gone?" 

"The safe has been opened," ex- 
plained the manager, "and the gold 
taken from it during the night." 

"And you think that David—?" 

"Not at all — not at all," said 
Orimes quickly, "but, unfortunately, 
Senor David happened to be in the 
room when Ramon placed the brick 
in the safe, and — ah — we are forced 
to put him under arrest until the 
truth is discovered." 

" Where is Ramon ? " asked Jona- 
than, quietly. 

"In the cuartel," answered the 
manager. 

" And White?" 

"He is also deprived of his liberty 
for the present," said the Governor. 
"It is really very unfortunate." 

The guards started toward the 
door with their prisoner. Jonathan 
followed. 

" May I speak to David?" he asked. 
Orimes shook his head; "I'm afraid 
not," he answered; "not yet." 

"No matter," said Jonathan, lay- 
ing his hands, for a moment, on 
David's shoulders. David smiled 
again. "To-morrow," said his friend, 
and then he held his head up proudly 
and stepped down into the street. 

Jonathan stood at a little distance, 
watching until the heavy prison gate 
swung back and hid them from his 
sight. 

"To-morrow," he told himself, but 
in his heart he was afraid. 

It is a dreary and hopeless thing, 
in Todos Santos, to feel the doors of 
the cuartel shut fast behind you, as 
Jonathan well knew. Mafiana, 
mafiana y siempre maftana, and justice 
moves slowly. 

But bad news flies. In an hour the 
town was throbbing with intense ex- 
citement over the robbery and the 
arrests which had followed. The six 
narrow streets which straggled, 
picturesquely, this way and that, 
were filled with men; men from every 
country under heaven; men who had 
been poor and were rich; who had 
been rich and were poor; men who 
laughed and men whose laughter lay 
far behind; men who came and went 
as they pleased, and men who came 
but did not go, because upon the 
farther side of that dividing line which 
cut them off from the United States, 
the law stood waiting, grim and re- 
lentless. 

And there was not one among them 
all who had an evil word to say of 
David. "There is some big mistake," 
was the general verdict, and Jonathan 
agreed with all his heart. He had 
seen so many of these mistakes in the 
five years which he and David had 
spent in this out-of-the-way corner of 
the earth. 

They were part of the vast army of 
younger sons, these two, bound by no 
ties of blood, but drifting together, 
hither and thither, and the offer 



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which had come to them from this 
small, insignificant Mexican town, had 
not been a thing to be despised, but 
rather to be seized upon as a special 
piece of good luck, and accepted out 
of hand. 

So they had journeyed to the new 
world because there was no room for 
tbem in the old. David and his 
Jonathan, who was not Jonathan at 
all, but just plain, everyday John. 
But, in the old days when they were 
two merry boys, roaming through 
English meadows, someone had called 
them David and Jonathan, and the 
name had clung, until after twenty 
years, with the green of those 
meadows a world's journey from them, 
they were David and Jonathan still. 

Through the long night, Jonathan 
sat at his window looking down into 
the quiet street and thinking of many 
things. But most of all, he thought 
of a girl, far away in England, who 
was sleeping peacefully while the man 
she loved lay in prison. And he re- 
membered how near the time had 
been for David to cross the sea and 
bring her back with him, this girl 
with the fair, soft hair and gentle 
eyes. Then he sighed a little, poor 
Jonathan, and buried his one secret a 
little deeper in his heart, and fell to 
wondering what the morrow would 
bring to light. But the morrow 
came and went, and there had been 
found not the slightest clue. No new 
arrests were made; the men in jail 
were examined and re-examined, tell- 



Tlir THEM FOB 



/<32E?i Coughs, Colds, 
Asthma, Bronchitis, 

Hoarseness 
and Sore Throat. 



Bronchial 



Fac-Simile *S / s9 • on ev 

Signature ot ^£«//g^„^t. *>*■ 



January 30, 1900. 



SAN ] ITF.lt. 



at 



ing, each one. the same story as at 
first, but the mystery was no nearer 
to being solved. It is as difficult, 
sometimes, to prove a man's innocence 
as it is to prove his guilt. 

"It must come all ri^ht,' - David 
would say, when his friend fretted at 
the slowness with which the investiga- 
tions were conducted. "The man who 
took the brick will be found out, de- 
pend upon it." But the man was not 
found; days passed, and weeks, and 
months; nothing was discovered, and 
nothing was done. Finally, at the 
end of six months, White, the English- 
man who kept the books of the bank, 
was released; there being no evidence 
against him. 

The Mexican, Ramon, in whose 
hands the stolen gold was last seen, 
was held a few weeks longer; his pro- 
perty was seized by the Government, 
but, although many believed him 
guilty, for lack of proof he was at 
length set free. 

Unfortunately for David, because 
of his responsible position, nothing 
would satisfy the judges but that he 
should be tried. Another weary in- 
terval elapsed, of hoping and despair- 
ing, until at last, after fourteen 
months, the end came. 

There was a long-drawn-out and 
solemn trial, and at its close, David 
walked out of the court-room — free. 

He was welcomed like a king, this 
quiet man, pale with the prison 
pallor; he was taken on the shoulders 
of the crowd and carried through the 
streets and up the winding steps to 
the great hotel, and feasted and 
toasted and cheered to the skies. 

At first, even to Jonathan, there 
had seemed no change in David, but 
when the flush of wonder at his re- 
lease, and the excitement which filled 
him, died away, it was evident to all 
that his health was broken; the damp 
prison air had done its work. After 
much persuasion, he was induced to 
go to the nearest American town for 
the treatment he needed. 

And Jonathan took up life again 
with a light heart; the Government 
gave up the missing brick as gone be- 
yond recall, and Todos Santos ceased 

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^"^ and " pearl glass " lamp- 
chimneys ; they are made of 
tough glass, tough against 
heat ; they do not break in 
use ; they do from accident. 

They are clear, transparent, 
not misty. Look at your 
chimney. How much of the 
light is lost in the fog ? 

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more. 

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Address 



Macbbth, Pittsburgh, Pa. 



to wonder, and forgot the whole 
affair. 

It was, perhaps, a month from the 
time of David's departure, when one 
day, late in the afternoon, the Gov- 
ernor entered the office where Jona- 
than was at work. He was quite 
alone, which in itself was an unusual 
thing, but when be closed and locked 
the door behind him, Jonathan was 
too astonished to speak. Orimes 
smiled at his bewildered face. 

"Jonathan, where is Ramoo?" he 
asked, still smiling. 

"Ramon?" Jonathan repeated, 
"why Ramon has not been in Todos 
Santos for months." 

"True," said the Governor, thought- 
fully; "very true." He gazed intently 
at the floor. "My boy, he began at 
length, "would you like very much to 
see Ramon?" 

"No," was the short answer. 

"No? But if Ramon held in his 
hands a certain gold brick, would you 
like to see him then?" 

Jonathan felt his hands grow cold. 

" What do you mean?" he asked in 
a low voice. 

It was not a long story which 
Orimes had to tell. 

A boy, hunting on the shore, had 
come upon a yacht, anchored in a 
small, sheltered cove, and he over- 
heard enough of the conversation of 
two men lying in the shadow of its 
sail, to send him flying over the hills 
to the town. 

"You will go with the rurales and 
the boy then?" asked the Governor. 
"I should like to have some responsi- 
ble person to be there at the arrest, 
to take charge of the brick, and as 
David is not here — " 

"Oh yes, I'll go," said Jonathan. 
He caught his breath fiercely. "Why, 
man, I'm mad to go." 

Orimes laughed a little. "You are 
a good friend, my boy," he said; then 
he unlocked the door. 

The night was intensely dark, and 
the men who picked their way through 
the undergrowth of sage and cactus, 
along the side of the hill, were breath- 
less with excitement. One careless 
step, one boulder loosened from its 
place, and the bird would fly. 

As they strode along, Jonathan was 
filled with a sudden sense of the pity 
of it. The man over there, bending 
above his digging, in the dim light, 
had lost everything he had called his 
own, for this; and now, in sight of the 
promised land, even this was to be 
taken from him. 

They crept closer and closer. The 
man flung away his spade, and stoop- 
ing, lifted a small, earth-covered ob- 
ject from its hiding place. 

Now was the time. With a bound, 
the guards were upon him; he was 
held in strong hands, and flung back- 
ward upon the ground. The brick 
fell from his grasp, and Jonathan saw 
his face. 

"David!" 

The judges shook their heads; there 
was nothing at all to be done. A man 
cannot be placed twice in jeopardy, 
not even if he is caught red-handed, 
as this one had been. He had been 
tried for a crime, and acquitted; he 



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could never be tried for the same 
crime again. The brick was safe, 
and there was an end of it, at least. 

And David, for the second time, 
walked out of his prison — free. 

Jonathan stood in the twilight, up- 
on the broad veranda of the hotel, 
looking out of the desolate coast road. 

Footsteps sounded behind him, he 
glanced up wearily. "Jonathan," 
said a voice he knew. He turned up- 
on him. "You!" he said, "you!" 
David's outstretched hand fell at his 
side. He took a step toward the 
door. 

"I'm going in," he muttered. 

A sudden pity wrenched Jonathan's 
heart. "I wouldn't," he said, very 
gently. 

For a moment they stood in silence, 
looking into each other's faces; then 
David turned and went down into the 
night. — Madge Mannix in Truth. 



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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



January 20, 1900. 




C. M. MANN 

Successor to I. DE TURK 

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DINNERS have been the chief form of entertainment 
the past two weeks, though theatre parties are also 
frequent and in the main very pleasant — to those compos- 
ing the party — and of these Dr. Harry Tevis was the host 
of the largest one which has taken place this week. 

The dinner which was given by Mrs. J. R. K. Nuttall in 
honor of the "Viscountess de Lalande was a particularly en- 
joyable one, so many old friends being among the guests. 
These, numbering twenty, were seated at a prettily dec- 
orated table, of which the dominating tints were pink, and 
the menu was delicious. 

Miss Flood's dinner was in honor of the Eastern friends 
who have been her guests for some time past. Ed Green- 
way gave the first of a series of dinners on Tuesday in the 
Red Room of the Bohemian Club; Miss Ethel Hager was 
the chief guest. 

Our young society had a busy time of it on Thursday, 
between Miss Edith Stubbs' luncheon and Miss Bernie 
Drown's dinner, and yet quite a number of their guests 
managed to take in the Symphony Concert at the Grand 
between the two functions, for only to show one's self there 
will satisfy the demands of fashion. Last evening the Fri- 
day Fortnightlies had their usual dance at Cotillion Hall. 
Next Friday evening there will be two gala gatherings. 
In Native Sons Hall La Jeunesse Club are to have their 
Army and Navy Cotillion, which will be led by Lieutenant 
Jack Haines, representing the Army, and Lieutenant 
Winship the Naval branch of the service; so the buds are 
all in a twitter of excited anticipation; and at Maple Hall 
the Entre Nous Club will give a Colonial bal poudre which 
promises to be a brilliant affair. Another "Colonial" 
evening will be given by the California Club on Tuesday, 
the 30th. Mrs. J. H. Jewett is arranging all the details 
of the reception, and those invited are requested, so far 
as possible, to appear in costume representing "some cel- 
ebrated character of the early days of our nation." That 
it will be a delightful entertainment there can be but little 
doubt. 

As foreshadowed in these columns a couple of weeks 
ago, "Baby" entertainments, for the introduction of 
which in San Francisco's Swim Miss Hager can claim the 
distinction, are the fad of the hour. The dinner given by 
the Hagers was such a success Mrs. Sam Buckbee was 
anxious to see if she could not go one better, and as that 
little lady never does anything by halves, it can easily be 
supposed that her dinner last night was a joy forever to 
all who took part in it; unluckily, it cannot be done justice 
to in this issue. There are others on the tapis for next 
week, and 'tis said that at the book store Mother Goose is 
having an immense sale. 

If Mme. Nevada had remained in San Francisco several 
weeks, it is doubtful if she could have found time to ac- 
cept all the invitations showered upon her by old friends 
and new. Still, amid the hurry of her brief visit, she has 
been able to give a few hours of her time to' some of them, 
and one of the most enjiyable of her entertainments was 
the dinner given by Mrs. W. E. Sharon of Piedmont last 
Saturday, at which Mme. Nevada was the chief guest. 
The party included Mme. Nevada and her husband, Dr. 
Palmer, Mrs. H. C. Mygatt, Miss Cora Young, Miss Elsa 
Van Manderscheld, Miss Pauline Love, Miss Mignon 
Palmer, Peter C. Allen, Walter Leimert, William Mien 
and Robert C. Newell. Later in the evening Mrs. Sharon 
had a reception. 

Though Miss Mamie McMullen and Jesse Godley have 
been engaged for many moons, it was only publicly an- 
nounced a few days ago, coupled with the date for the 
weddin,', which will be on Tuesday of next week. It will 
be a quiet, home ceremonial, owing to the recent death of 
the groom's father, but it is said the floral decorations of 
of the bride's maternal abode on Post street will be not 
only elaborate but novel. The honeymoon trip will be 
across the continent. 

The wedding of Miss Norma Bachman and Joseph M. 
Lowe was one of the events of Wednesday, and, as usual 



January jo, 1900. 



BAN FRA: EW8 LETTER. 



*3 



with like functions in Jewish circles, it was a brilliant 
affair. The ceremony was followed by a dinner, and that 
In turn by dancing for several hours, and then supper. 

The wedding of Miss Miriam Moore and E. J. Pringle 
took place at the home of the bride's father, Exeter, 
Tulare County, last Wednesday. The bride's sister 
Frances Moore, was maid-of-houor, and the groom's 
brother Sidney officiated as best man. 

Tuesday, February ~th, is the new date set for the wed- 
ding of Miss Martha Alexander and John Waterhouse of 
Honolulu, instead of January 30th. This is due to the de- 
tention in Honolulu of the groom-elect, owing to the quar- 
antine of the steamer Australia by which he is to come. 
The ceremony will take place at the Alexanders' resi- 
dence on Sixteenth street, Oakland, and will be on a very 
elaborate scale. 

Among the engagements of the week are those of Miss 
Florence Sharon to Peter C. Allen, in which Oakland 
society is especially interested; and of Miss Bessie Code to 
R. F. Nicholson, TJ. S. N.. at present in command of the 
torpedo boat Farragut, with the Eastertide as the date 
set for the wedding. 

The engagement has been announced of Dr. Harald 
Ohrwall to Miss Henrietta Zeile. 

Oq_ Monday Mrs. Leopold Weil was "at home" at the 
Hote: Richelieu, the first reception held by her and Miss 
Alice Weil since their return from Europe. 

The first and third Fridays in February are the dates 
set by Mrs. Isaac Hecht to be at home to her friends. 

Mrs. Bowie-Detrick is having a delightful visit with her 
brother, Dr. Bowie, in Japan. She is looked for on her 
return home during this month. 

An exhibition of bronzes will be held at the Mark Hop- 
kins Institute of Art for one week, beginning Friday, Jan- 
uary 26th. The exhibition opens Thursday evening with a 
reception to members only, on which occasion a fine pro- 
gramme of orchestral music will be rendered, under the 
direction of Mr. Henry Heyman. The display will consist 
of a great variety of bronzes, representing ancient and 
modern Japanese workmanship, modern French and Rus- 
sian bronzes, and some beautiful reproductions of the an- 
cient Greek and Roman bronzes; the collection also in- 
cludes a number of vases of various material. The exhibi- 
tion will be open for one week, closing Thursday evening, 
February 1st, with a concert. 

One of the chief society events of to-day is the tea 
which Mrs. McAffee gives for Mrs. A. C. Hunter, who is 
spending the winter with her sister, Mrs. Lloyd Tevis. A 
large number of cards have been issued and elaborate 
preparations made in the way of decorations. Mrs. Mon- 
roe Salisbury and her daughters, as well as Mrs. Hunter, 
will be among those who will assist the hostess in receiv- 
ing. 

Those best of friends and most important and welcome 
of visitors, the Letter Carriers, will give their twelfth an- 
niversary ball at the Native Sons' Hall to-night. There 
will be a big crowd ana a jolly time. The "hat check" 
money will be devoted to the fund of the Letter Carriers' 
Mutual Aid Association. 

Summer and winter alike things move along joyfully at 
the Hotel Rafael. There is really no such thing as winter 
in San Rafael, and what with the golf links and the beau- 
tiful drives and the splendid apartments and service at 
the great hotel, it is an idepl spot to live in at any season 
of the year. 

The most delicious coffee, rolls, and cake, moderate 

prices, at Roemer's Original Vienna Cafe, 205 Kearny, 
near Sutter. 

A delightful Saturday to Monday trip. Napa Soda Springs 
changed hands, open all the year. A. Dollmann proprietor, A. 
Gotard chef. ■ 



One application of Smith's Dandrutt' Fomade stops itching scalp; 
three to six applications removes all dandruff. Try it. Price SO 
cents, at all druggists. Sample free. Address Smith Brothers- 
Fresno, Oal. 

Cehtbal Cafe, coffee and luncheon parlor, 211 Grant avenue. The 
place to get a fine steak, tender chop, excellent coffee, tea and pure 
milk. Neat and prompt service. M. D. Christensen, proprietor. 



Mothers, be sure and use 
children while teething. 



Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup for your 




San FranciSCO ^ y™. Larse n, Manager 

Novelty Leather Co. 

Manufacturers of the California Brand Ladies' and Gents' 
Fine Belts and Pocket Books. All kinds of Leather 
Novelties. Leather and Canvas Sporting Goods. 
Our Specialty: Mexican Carved Leather Goods. 
Medical, Surgical and all kinds of Drummers' Cases. 



412 Market street, 



Telephone Bush 94 



San Francisco 



Oregon Short Line 

Only two days to Butte. 
Shortest line to Utah, 
Idaho and Montana Points. 

D. W. HITCHCOCK, General Agent, 
1 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

You cannot diminish drunkenness without diminishing crime, 
insanity, pauperism, and taxes. 

All this is done by 



The... K EELEY 
Institutes 



At 1170 Market Street, 
Donohoe Building, S. F. 



Or Carson City, Nevada. 



SUPERFLUOUS HAIR 

painlessly and effectually 
removed by the Electric Needle. One course of ray treatment, I 
positively guarantee, extirpates these unsightly imperfections with- 
out mark or injury to the most delicate skin. Consultation free and 
confidential. Instruction given in any branch of the business. 

MISS BARRETT, Dermatologist, 1207 Market St., Opp. City Hall, 



MUSIC 

MUSIC, ELOCUTION ~ 



Complete depart- 
ments in fill 
branches of 
DRAMATIC ART 



•OHOOl OF PIANO TUN'NO 

Pacific Coast Conservatory of Music 

The Leading' Conservatory of the West. t T n- 
equalled Free Advantages. Send for Beautifully 
Illustrated Catalogue. 

H. TOURJEE, DIRECTOR. 

536 Sutter Street, San Francisco Cal 




SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 20, 1900. 



5UNBCAMS 




STOLEN FROM THIEVES. 



BANKING 



— Mrs. Frillinqton— You heard, of course, that my 
daughter and I were to have gone to Miss Cashmore's 
wedding to-morrow. And now, I'm sorry to say, the 
ceremony is postponed for a month on account of the 
bridegroom's accident. Country Visitor — How very dis- 
tressing! Nothing serious, I hope? Mrs. Frillington — 
O, but indeed it is— most serious! We have had our gowns 
made specially in Paris — the very latest thing— and of 
course in a month's time they will be utterly out of date! 

— Her head rested on his shoulder, and her little hand 
lay confidingly in his. "Tell me now, Alfred," said the 
happy maiden, "how you ever came to pick me out as the 
girl you wanted to marry." "Well, Dora," replied the 
ecstatic young man, in a gush of confidence, "it was maw 
that put me up to it." 

— "Your friend didn't go home to Kentucky to vote." 
"No," answered Col. Stilwell, "and I dunno's I blame him. 
You see, he's rather near-sighted. If he wore his glasses 
his neighbors would think he was putting on style, and if 
he left 'em off he couldn't see where he was shooting.' 

— "Jean, did you go to the stationer's and get some 
sample visiting cards?" "Yes, madam, here are about 
100 sample cards of counts and princes, with crests and 
coats of arms." "Very well, you may put them in the 
card tray in the parlor!" 

— "Now, sir, can you explain why you ran away after 
being called on this jury?" asked the indignant judge. 
"I couldn't help it, judge," said the trembling juryman. 
"I heard some one say something about hanging the jury, 
and I am opposed to capital punishment." 

— Mr. Nagger (after the battle) — Bah! madam; to think 
there was ever a time when I deemed you an angel. Mrs. 
Nagger — -And don't you think so now, Mr. Nagger? Mr. 
Nagger — No, madam; I am fondly anticipating the time 
when you shall become one. 

— "I wonder why Fraulein Amalie always smiles so 
pleasantly at Schmerzfrel, the dentist?" "O, that's be- 
cause she has got a new set of teeth on credit, on condi- 
tion that she passes his office every day, and shows that 
she hasn't pawned them!" 

— It is related that when a salesman at $6 a week in a 
Fulton street store recently told a young woman who re- 
fused to marry him that "there is nothing left for me but 
wormwood and gall," she replied: "Where did you get 
the wormwood?" 

— Husband (off for a long journey) — Do you often think 
of me when 1 am gone? Wipe — Indeed, I do; it takes me 
a week to get the smell of smoke out of the house. 

— "Why don't you marry the girl if you love her so? She 
is a real pearl." "Yes, but look at the mother-of-pearl." 

CHICAGO IN THREE DAYS 

Via Chicago, Union Pacific and Northwestern Line every day in the 
year from San Francisco at 8:30 a. m. Buttet, smoking, library cars, 
with barber. Double drawing-room sleeping cars. Dining cars — 
meals a la carte. Breakfast in Diner on leaving Oakland Pier. 
Daily through tourist car to Chicago without change at 6:30 p. m. 
R. R. Ritchie, General agent Pacific Coast, 2 New Montgomery 
treet, (Palace Hotel) San Francisco. 

THE "OVERLAND LIMITED ■• l-A Solid Vestibuled Train 
Via the UNION PACIFIC leaves San Francisco daily at 8.00 a. m. 
Breakfast served in dining Car. 

Three days to Chicago without change. One day quicker than 
any other line. 

Finest modern Pullman equipment, including library and buffet 
cars and dining cars, a la carte. D. W. Hitchcock, No. 1 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco. 

ASK THE TICKET AGENT to send you from Chicago to New 
York, Boston, or other Eastern cities, over the Nickel Plate [N. 
Y. C. & St. L. R. R.] Quick time, satisfactory service and no 
extra fares charged passengers. Jay W. Adams, Pacific Coast 
Passenger Agent, 37 Crocker Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

The most comfortable way to travel to Portland and all points 
in the Northwest is by the steamers of The Oregon Railroad & 
Navigation Co., E. C. Ward, General Agent, 630 Market street, 8. P. 



London and San Francisco Bank, Limited 

Authorized Capital. K3.50O.00O. Capital Subscribed and Fully Paid. $2,450,000 

N D- Rldeout, Managing Director 

Gustav Friederlch, Cashier 

Arthur L. Black, Assistant Cashier 

HEAD OFFICE— 71 Lombard street, London. 
PORTLAND BRANCH— Chamber of Commerce Building. 
TACOMA BRANCH— 1156 Pacific Avenue. 

Bankers— Bank of England, London Joint Stock Bank, Limited. 

Agents in New York — J. P. Morgan & Co. 
This bank is prepared to grant letters of credit available in any part of the 
world and to transact every description of banking and exchange business 

Bank of British Columbia 

S. E. cor. Bush and Sansome StB. Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 

HEAD OFFICE: 60 Lombard St., London. 

Capital Paid Up. $3,000,000. Reserve Fund, $500,000. 

BRANCHES-Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster, Kamloops, Nani- 
amo. Nelson Rossland, Sandon, British Columbia: Portland, Oregon. 

This bank transacts a general banking business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to check, and special deposits received. Commercial credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved bills discounted and advances 
made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates upon its 
head office and branches, and upon its agents, as follows: 

New York — Merchants' Bank of Canada: Chicago— First National Bank: 
Liverpool — North and South Wales Bank; Scotland — British Linen Com- 
pany: Ireland— Bank of Ireland; Mexico — London Bank of Mexico: Sooth 
America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and Japan — 
Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and New Zea- 
land — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company of Sydney, 
Ld.; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

Also on Dawson City, Yukon district, arrangements having been made 
with the Canadian Bank of Commerce whereby it is prepared to issue drafts 
and letters of credit on that bank at above point, and transact other banking 
business. Terms upon application. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital $2,500,000 Paid-TJp Capital, $2,000,000 

Reserve Fund. 8850.000 

HEAD OFFICE— 40 Threadneedle street, London, E. C. 
AGENTS: New York— Agency of the London, Paris and American Bank, 
Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y.; Paris— Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 
Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM. C. ALTSCHUL. Managers. 
R. ALTSCHUL. Cashier. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Pine and Sansome Sts., San Francisco, 
Jas. K. Wilson, President Wm. Pierce Johnson. Vice-President 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL. 8500,000 

DLRECTORS-Janies K. Wilson, D. J. Staples, Wm. Pierce Johnson, Geo. 
A. Pope. H. E. Huntington, John Barton. C. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS ; New York-Hanover National Bank. Chase National Bank; 
Chemical National Bank, Boston—National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co.; Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis 
— The Mechanics' Bank. KanBas City— First National Bank. London- 
Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris—Morgan, Harjes & Co. 

Germania Trust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital, $1,000,000 Paid-Up Capital and Reserve. $375,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator. Guardian, or Trustee. 

Check Accounts of individuals, firnis, and corporations solicited. 

Legal Depository for money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
paid on trust deposits and savings. Investments carefully selected 
for our clients. 

Board of Directors— Ernst A. Denicke, F. Kronenberg, J. C. Rued, A. 
Sbarboro. F. C. Siebe, Albert G. Wieland, H. P. Sonntag. John Rapp, H. 
Brunner. 

Officers— Ernst A. Denicke, President; F. Kronenberg, vice-president; H. 
Brunner. C ashier 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C. 

Capital Authorized 86,000,000 Paid Up 81,500,000 

Subscribed 3.000,000 Reserve Fund... 700.000 

Agents at New York--J. & W. Seligman & Co., 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the world. 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion. 

IGN. STELNHART. P. N. LLLIENTHAL, Managers. 

Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St., Mills Building. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans made. 

DDtECTORS. 

William Alvord S. L. Abbot, Jr. H. H. Hewlett 

William Babcock O. D. Baldwin E. J. McCutchen 

Adam Grant W. S. Jones R. H. Pease 




SAN ) IHK. 



35 



BANKING 



THE CRICKET SONG JAPANESE.-*. h stood/mo. in scribneb's- 

Here in my lonely cottage, 

Now winter winds are cold. 
I hearken to the crickets. 

And sigh that I am old. 

I hear their small bells tinkle, 

Like beads of silver rain 
That break on the brooks in summer, 

And dream I am young again. 

I see my native rice-fields 

Flushed with streams in spring, 

And I hear the frogs, so many 
The waters seem to sing. 

Sweet are the waters of Settsn, 

The rice-streams sweetest of all, 

For there all day in the sunlight 
The cherry blossoms fall. 

Nothing falls here save snowflakes, 

Blown from the wintry sky; 
No light here save from embers 

That sullenly smoldering die : 

No sound save the bells of my crickets, 
Somewhere in the darkness rung, 

And the sigh of the poor old singer 
For something that still is yoong 1 



THE FOG.— IDA WHIPPLE BENHAM, IH YOUTH'S COMPANION- 



The fog went down to the sea, 

And what did the fog behold? 
A purple mystery 

And a dawn of dazzling gold : 
And over against the dawn 

A shallop rode the crest. 
And the soft slow fog stole on 

And gathered it to his breast. 

The fog went up to the land. 

Ana what did the fog behold? 
One weeping on the strand 

In the twilight drear and cold. 
A broken shallop lay 

Against the dull sands pressed- 
And the slow fog stole away 

With his secret in his breast. 



WHEN I AM DEAD.— theodosia garrison, in truth- 

" When I am dead," she said. "I.pray you, dear, 
Think of me not as far away, but here 

Beside you; ever in the sweet, old place, 
Where we sat hand in hand, and face to face: 
Not as a homesick soul in some far sphere. 

" Through all the days and nights shall 1 be near; 
In summer twilights, or when earth is sere; 
Lo I I shall beg of Death for this one grace, 
When I am dead. 

" Not as a sad-eyed ghost will I appear. 
I shall bring all of comfort, naught of fear. 
Only the woman that you love will come; 
No death is strong enough to hold me dumb 
Or helpless, summoned by your lightest tear, 
When I am dead." 



MY HERO.— ELLEN SEAWELL- 



A soul, strong, noble, made to lean upon ; 

A heart, warm, constant, true and loyal aye ; 

Eyes that look fearlessly into my own, 
With matchless bravery to do or die ; 

The color of the eyes I may not guess- 
Blue, brown, or gray, I care not what they be: 

I only care to see the tenderness 

And love-light in them when they turn to me. 



Bank of California, San Francisco 

Gferftat, ?.'. DO Surplus, 9i.noo.ooo 

PfnAtand Lon koooant, Ootobw 1. L8B9, ?.'. 
wlI.II\M ILVORD CHARLES K. BISHOP, Via 

U.I.KN M. CI \N Secretary THOMAS BROWN 

N MBS smith. A-'t Coablorl I. F. MOULTON. M 
OORRBSPONDENTB 
New York— Moasre. Laldlaw 4 Co.: the Bank ol (Taw Y,,rk. ,v. B. A. 
Baltimore— ITie National Exchange Bank, Be inal Shawmot 

Think. Cfataaso— Illinois Trusl nmi Saving! Bank: Union National Bank. 

■ iiiliin Philadelphia National Hunk. St. 1 la — Bootroan'a Bunk. 

Virginia City. Nov.— Aronoy of The Hunk ol California, London Messrs 
N.M, Rothschild ft Sons. Paris— Messrs. da Rothschild Pnres. Berlln- 

Direotlonder Dis to Qeseilsohaft, China, Japan, and East Indlei 

lered Bunk of India, Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand— The 
Union Bank of Australia, Ltd.. and Bank ,»f N'cv Zealand. 

Lot-tore of credit issued available in till pnrts of the world. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

532 CALIFORNIA STREET, S. F. 



Reserve Fund $205*215 

Contingent Fund 412.76.? 

W. C. B. DePREMERY, Vice-President 
R. M. WELCH. Assistant Cashier 



Deposits July 1. 1899. 824,920.395 
Paid-up Capital 1.000,000 

E. B. POND. President 
LOVELL WHITE. Cashier 

Directors— Georcre W. Beaver. Thomas Mairee, W. C. B. de Fremery, Al- 
bert Miller. Robert Watt, George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin. George 
Tasheira, E. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farmine 
lands in the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may he made in checks payable 
in San Francisco. Post Office, or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p. m., and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only, 6;30 to 8 o'clook. 

Wells Fargo X Go. Bank 

N. E. Cor. Sansome and Suttee Sts. 

JOHN J. VALENTINE, President H. WADSWORTH, Cashier 

HOMER S. KING, Manager F. L. LIPMAN. Assistant Cashier 

H. L. MILLER, Second Assistant Cashier. 

Cash Capital and Surplus $6,250,000 

Branches — New York City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier: Salt Lake City. J. E. 

Dooly, Cashier: Portland, Or., R. M. Dooly, Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— John J. Valentine, Andrew Christeson, Oliver Eldridge, 

Henry E. Huntington, Homer S. King:, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, 

John Bermingham, Dudley Evans. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital 81,000,000. Paid Dp Capital 8300,000 

James D. Phelan, President S. G. Murphy, Vice-President 

George A. Story, Cashier John A. Hooper, Vice-President 

C. B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier. 

"Rate of Interest on Loans secured by improved 
San Francisco Real Estate - - SIX PER CENT 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 
Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells, Fargo & Co., or Exchange on 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 

The Gernaan Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 82,213.116.59 

Capital actually paid up in Cash 1,000 000 00 

Deposits Deeember 30, 1899 28,563,655.41 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President, B. A. Becker; First Vice-President 
Daniel Meyer: Second Vice-President, H. Horstman: Cashier, A. H. R. 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann: Secretary, George Tourny 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller; General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Ign. Stoinhart, E. Rohte, H. B. Russ, D. N. Walter, N. Ohlandt, and John 
Lloyd 

Continental Building X Loan Association 

Established in 1889. OF CALIFORNIA. 
Subscribed Capital. .8 10,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund. ..8210,000 
Paid-in- Capital 1,500.000 Monthly Income, over 100.000 

lTd Purpose is to help its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on improved property, the members giving first liens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help its Stockholders to earn 10 to 12 per cent, interest on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing interest at the rate of 5 
per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits and 6 per cent, per annum on 
Terra Deposits. 

Home Ofhee— 222 Sansome St.. San Francisco, Cal. 

WM. Corbin, Seoretary and General Manager 

Crocker- Wool worth National Bank 

OP SAN FRANCISCO 
Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Sts. 

Paid-up-Capital 81,000.000 

Wm. H. Crocker, President Ceo. W. Kline, Cashier 

W. E. Brown, Vice-President W. Gregg, Jr., Assistant -Cashier 

Directors— W. H. Crocker, B. B. Pond. W. E. Brown. C. E. Green. G. W. 
Kline, Henry J. Crocker. G. W. Scott. 



26 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. January 20, 1900. 



BUSINESS 
TELEPHONES 



APPLY... 



5 c — 
perDay 



(216) 

Bush St. 

Redueed from lO^per Day 



January 20, 1900. 



BAN )'i:\- NEWS LETTKR. 



PERSONALIS 



If it be true, as reported, that the Queen pr<>\ 

to spend thp spring at San Remo instead of at Cimlet, 
Her Majesty's decision will certainly be very popular with 
her subjects. San Remo is a delightful spot, and its cli- 
mate is milder and more sheltered than either Cannes or 
Nice. The old town, with its streets of stairs and houses 
propped up by arched buttresses, is wonderfully pictur 
ej-que, and there are charming walks by the sea and 
through olive woods and by water-courses. But the 
drives are not so many as those about Cimiez, which sur- 
pass in beauty and number those of any other place on the 
Riviera. The leaders of English society at San Remo 
(among those who have residences there) are Lady Wal- 
rond and Lady Ogle. There is a theatre, a daily band, 
which plays in the Public Gardens and on the Promenade; 
and there are many mild amusements. Altogether, San 
Remo is a charming little place, though it cannot be de- 
scribed as very fashionable. Of course, if the Queen goes 
there, things will be changed in this respect. A delight- 
ful anecdote was going the rounds in San Remo at the 
time of the Dreyfus trial. The black gentleman who pre- 
sides over the Infernal Regions was reported to have 
taken down the sign which used to be above the entrance 
in Dante's time, and substituted for "Lasciate ogni 
speranza, voi ch' entrate," the more modern one of "Ici 
on parle Francois." 

The Queen's farewell to the Highlanders, ordered 

to the Cape from Balmoral, reminds one of how Her Maj- 
esty saw the Guards off forty-five years ago, when they 
left London for Malta, en route for the Russian war. They 
marched past in front of Buckingham Palace, the Queen 
and Prince Albert looking oh from the balcony. As the 
last company was going by the Queen — young, girlish, 
impulsive — stooped down, took off one of her shoes and 
threw it among them, with the old English idea of prong 
good luck. Even the discipline of the Guards broke down, 
and a dozen men scrambled for it. Who actually secured 
the royal token of good luck was never known. Probably 
the guardsman who carried it off with bim was among the 
killed or missing of some Crimean battlefield, and his 
knapsack was plundered by maurauders who had no idea 
where the little satin shoe had originally come from. 

Max O'Rell has lectured nineteen hundred times, 

and was never stopped but once, and that was a fortnight 
ago in Sunderland. There was an audience of two thou- 
sand people. One thousand nine hundred and seventy of 
these wanted to hear the lecture, but thirty occupants of 
the sixpenny gallery refused to listen. This is why: The 
Sunday evening entertainments in Sunderland usually con- 
sist of a little talk, perhaps a little music, and a profuse 
magic-lantern display. The committee offered the people 
a change, thinking that Max O'Rell was amusing enough 
without pictures. But the thirty in the sixpenny gallery 
differed with the committee, and they eventually carried 
the day, the more so as there were no police present. 
Max O'Rell says that he had been feeling a little languid, 
but the excitement stirred him up, and he has been in 
better health ever since. 

The German Emperor bestowed the Order of the 

Prussian Black Eagle on no fewer than eight persons dur- 
ing the year just past, namely, on Duke Albrecht of Wiir- 
temberg, Count von Osten-Sacken, the Russian Ambas- 
sador to the Prussian Court; Prioce Waldemar of Prussia 
(on His Royal Highness attaining his tenth year), Duke 
Nicholas of Wurtemberg, the Crown Prince of Japan, 
General von Biilow, Prince Gustave Adolph of Norway 
and Sweden, and the King of Spain. 

— "Marriage," said the proverb quoter, "is a lottery." 
"Yes," answered the sultan of Sulu as he sadly waved his 
hand toward the harem, "and there's a bunch of blanks." 



SweaboS with the New Year— that ia to say awear off drinking 
dubious whiskies. The J. F. Cutter and Argonaut brands are 
whiskies for the wise. E. Martin & Co., 411 Market street, are sole 
agents for the United States. 



Allen's Pbess Clipping Bureau, 510 Montgomery street. San Francisco, 
deals In all binds of newspaper information, business, personal, politioal, 
from press of State, ooast and country. Tel. Main 1042. 




tsa 



uwdtr DKi'AKrnnrr. 




LONDON ASSURANCE. 



OCEAN MARINE. 



Capital Subscribed . ... $4,482,700 

Capital Paid Dp 2,241,3TB 

Assets 19,186,148 

Capital Subscribed $6,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 600,000 

AsBets 2,602,060 



Strictly First-Class 

All Modern Improvements 
Electric Lights 



Hotel Lyndon 

Los Gatos, Cal. 



Liberal Rates 



LYMAN H. TOLFREE, 
Proprietor 



HOTEL BARTHOLDI, 



THE very center of the city, convenient to 
all the big stores and all places of amusement, 
European plan, $1 a day and upwards. 



23d street and Broadway, New York 

(Opposite Madison Square Park) 



Reed & Roblee, Mere 



HOTEL BELLA VISTA A "»"■— h°*°' 



The Bella Vista is the Pioneer First-class 
Family Hotel of San Francisco. All the 
comforts of a modern residence. 



iooi Pine street 



HRS. DENVER, Prop. 



OCCIDENTAL HOTEL 



Wm. B. Hooper, Manager 



A quiet home, centrally located, for 
those who appreciate comfort and 
attention. 

San Francisco 



GRAY BROTHERS 



(^oncrete and Artificial 
STONE WORK 



228 Montgomery Street, S. F. 
205 New High St., Los Angeles. 



Joseph Gillott's Steel Pens, THE AWAK t^l G0 , 1893 

Gold Medals Paris, 1878-18'J9. These pens are " the 
best in the world." Sole agent for the United States, 
Mb. Hbnky Hoe, 91 John street. New York. 
Sold by all stationers. 



Eye. Ear, Nose, and Throat. 



H. Isaac Jones, M. D. 

Office— 234 Post street, between Grant avenue and Stockton 

streets, S, F. Hours, 10 a. m. to 4. p. m. 

Sunday by appointment. Tel. Grant 10 

Samuel M. Shortridge, Atty-at-Law 

CROCKEn Building, San Francisco, Cal. 



ST. LAWRENCE Livery and 
Sales Stable 

423 Post street, between Powell and Mason, 
San Francisco. Telephone No. 1328 

W. E. Bridge, proprietor. 




Southern Pacific Co.—Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are due to arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 
[Main Line, Foot of Market Street] 

leave] From December 15, 1899 [arrive 

*7:00a Benicia.Suisun.Eliniia, ViRaville, Rumsey, and Sacramento.. *7:45 p 

*7:00a Shasta Express— Davie, Willows, Red Bluff, Portland *7:45 p 

*7:80a Martinez. Sun Ramon, Valleio. Napa, Calistoga, Santa Rosa *6:15 p 

•8:30 a The Overland Limited— Ogden, Denver, Omaha. Chicago **5:15 p 

*8:30 A San Jose, Livermore, Stockton, lone, Sacramento, Placerville. 

Marysville, Calico, Red Blurt*. *4:15 P 

*8:30a ^Milton.Oakdale.andSonora *4:15 P 

*9:00 A Hay wards. Niles. and way stations * 11:45 a 

*9:00 a Davis, Woodland, Knights Landing, Marysville, Oroville. ''7:45 r 

°9:00a Atlantic Express, Ogden and East *9:45 a 

*9:00 A Martinez, Tracy, Lathrop. Stockton, Merced and Fresno }'- :l5 p 

*9:00 a Port Costa, Fresno, Mojave and Los Angeles e^ 5 p 

*1O:O0a Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations *6 :45 p 

*11:0Oa Hay wards. Niles, and way stations *2:45 p 

°12:00 m Niles, Livermore, Stockton. Sacramento, Mendota, Hanford, 

Visalia.Porterville *4:15 p 

tl:00p Sacramento River Steamers f8:00 P 

*3:00p Haywards, Niles and way stations Z^'^ p 

*4:O0p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa. Calistoga, Santa Rosa *9:15 A 

*4:00p Benicia, Vacaville, Sacramento, Woodland, Knight's Landing 

Marysville. Oroville ■' *10:45 a 

*4:30p Niles, San Jose, and Stockton •7:15 p 

*5:00p The Owl Limited. Tracy, Fresno, Bakersfield, Saugus for 

Santa Barbara, Los Angeles *10:45 A 

^5:00 p Sunset Limited— El Paso. New Orleans and East '10:15 a 

•5:80 p Stockton, Merced, Fresno '''12:15 r 

•5:80 p Fresno. Bakersfield, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Deming, El 

Paso, New Orleans, and East *8:45 A 

*5:30p Santa Fe Route. Atlantic Express, for Mojave and East "6:45 P 

*6:00p Hay wards, Niles, and San Jose *7:45 a 

fr.;3(tp Vallejo *12:15 p 

*6:30p Oriental Mail— Ogden and East *8:50 p 

I7:00p Vallejo, Port Costa, and way stations 19:55 p 

*8:05p Oregon and California Express, Sacramento, Marysville, Red- 
ding, Portland Puget Sound and East *8:15 A 

Coast Division (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

*8:15A Newark, Centerville, San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek. Santa 

Cruz and way stations *5:50 p 

f2:15 p Newark, Centerville, San Jose, New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations 1 10:50 a 

*4:15p Newark, San Jose, Los Gatos *9:20 A 

611:45 p Hunters' Excursion, San Jose and waystations J7:20 p 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 
From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— *7:15, 9:00, and 11:00 
a. m., tl:00,*2:00, 13:00, o 4:00,t5:00and*6:00P.M. 

From Oaklakd- Foot of Broadway— *6:00, 8:00, 10:00 A. m.; Jl2:00, *1:00 
J2:00. °3:00, t4 :00, *5:00 P. M. 

Coast Division (Broad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets). 

t6:10A Ocean View, South San Francisco t6:30 P 

*7:00a San Jose and way stations (New Almaden Wednesday only) *1:30 P 

°9:00a San Jose, TresPinos. Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Paso Robles, 

San Luis Obispo, Surf, Lompoc, and principal waystations *4:10 p 

*10:40a San Jose and way stations **6:35 a 

*11:30 A San Jose and waystations *5;30 P 

t2:45 P San Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park. Palo Alto, Santa Clara, San 
Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, Salinas, Monterey, and Pacific 
Grove tl0:36 a 

!3:30p SanJoseand Way Stations *7;30 p 
4:15 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations *9i4S A 
5:00 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations t9:00 a 
5:30p San Jose and Principal Way Stations *8:35 a 

*6:30p San Jose and Way Stations + 8 -" 00 A 

Ml:45p SanJoseand Way Stations *7:30 p 

A for Morning. p for Afternoon. * Daily. t Sundays excepted. 

J Sundays only. b Saturdays only. 

fl Tuesdays and Fridays. c Thursdays and Sundays. 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and other 
information. 

Steamers leave Broadway 
Wharf, San Francisco. 

For Alaskan ports, 10 a. M.Jan. 1,6, 11, 16,21, 26,81: Feb. 5 

change to company's steamers at Seattle. 

For B.C. and Puget Sound Ports, 10 A. m.. Jan. 1, 6, 11, 16, 
21 , 26, 31 : Feb. 5, and every fifth day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay) 2 p. m., Jan. 4,0,11. 10 24 
2'.» ; Feb. 3. and every fifth day thereafter. 
For Newport (Los Angeles) and way ports, 9 a. m. Jan. 
3.7,11, 15. 19, 23. 27, 31 ; Feb. 4, and every fourth day thereafter. 

Fur San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, Santa Barbara, Port Los 
Angeles, Redondo, (Los Angeles) 11 a, m.. Jan. 1, 5,9, 13, 17, 21. 25, 29; Feb 2 
and every fourth day thereafter. 

For Mexican porta, 10 A m., 7th of each month. 
For further information obtain company's folder. 

The company reserves the right to change steamers, sailing dates, and 
hours of sailing without previous notice. 

TICKET OFFICE— No. 4 New Montgomery street. (Palace Hotel.) 
G00DALL, PERKINS & CO.. Gen.Agts.. 10 Market St., San Francisco 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 





SS" 

ss ■ 



Moana," Wednesday. Jan. 24, at 8 p, m . 
Australia/' Wednesday. Feb. 7, 1900, 2 p. m. 



California Northwestern R'y Co. 

LESSEE 

San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tibdkon Ferby— Foot of Market Street 

WEEK DAYS— 7:30,9:00, 11:00 A. m; 12:35, 3:30, 5:10, 6:30 p. M. Thursdays— 
Extra trip at 11:30 P.M. Saturdays— Extra trips at l:50and 11:30P. M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00. 9:30, 11:00 A. M. ; 1 :30. 3 :30, 5:00. 6:20 P. M. 
SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:10.7:50,9:20,11:10 A. m.: 12:45, 3:40, 5:10 P. m. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1 :55 and 6:35 p. m. 

SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40, 11:10 A.M.: 1:40, 3:40.5:05. 6:25 p. m. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Line to Cooleardie. Australia, and Capetown.South 
Airica. 

J. D. SPEECKELS & BROS CO 
Agents, 111 Montgomery St. Freight office 327 
Market St., San Francisco. 



Weak Men and Women ^t^rZT™ <!!%■■ 

it gives health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 323 Market 
street. San Francisco, Send for circular. 



Leave San Francisco 


In Effect Oct. 15, 1899 


Arrive in San Francisco 


Week days 


Sundays 


Destinations 


Sundays 


Week days 


7:30 am 
3:30 PM 
5:10 pm 


8:00 
9:30 
5:00 


AM 
AM 
PM 


Novato 
Petaluma 
Santa Rosa 


10:40 AM 
6;05 pm 
7:35 PM 


8:40 AM 
10:25 AM 
6:22 PM 


7:30 AM 
3:30 pm 


8:00 


AM 


Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdsburg, Lytton, 

Geyserville, CI over dale 


7:35 PM 


10:25 AM 
6:22 PM 


7:30 am 


8:00 


AM 


Hopland, Ukiah 


7:35 PM 


6:22 pm 


7:30 am 
3:30 PM 


8:00 


AM 


Guerneville 


7:35 PM 


10:25 AM 
6:22 pm 


7:30 am 
5:10 pm 


8:00 
5:00 


AH 
PM 


Sonoma 
Glen Ellen 


10:40 AM 
6 ;05 PM 


8:40 am 
6:22 pm 


7:30 am 
3:30 PM 


8:00 
5:00 


AM 

PM 


Sebastopol 


10:40 AM 
7:35 PM 


10:25 am 
6:22 pm 



Stages eonnect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs and White Sulphur 
Springs; at Lytton for Lytton Springs: at Geyserville for Skaggs' Springs; at 
Cliiverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for Duncan Springs, Highland Springs 
Kelseyville, Carlsbad Springs, Soda Bay, Lakeport, and Bartlett Springs; at 
Ukiah, for Vichy Springs, Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake, 
Witter Springs, Upper Lake. Porno, Potter Valley, John Day's, Riverside, 
Lierley's, Bucknell's, Sanhedrin Heights, Hullvilte, Booneville, Philo, 
Christine Soda Springs, Navarro, Whitesboro, Albion, Little River, Orr's 
Springs, Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, Westport, Usal Willits, Laytonville, 
Cummings, Bell's Springs, Harris, Olsen's, Dyer, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 
TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St.. Chronicle Building. 

H. C. WHITING, Gen. Manaeer. R. X. RYAN. Gen. Pass. Agent. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf, FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p. m., for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG, 

calling at Kobe (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hongkong 
with steamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Doeic (via Honolulu) Thursday, February 1, 1900 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Tuesday, February 27, 1900 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Friday, March 23,1900 

Doric (via Honolulu) Tuesday, April 17, 1900 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street 
corner First. D. D. STUBBS, General Manager. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Hibernla Savings and Loan Society. 

San Francisco. December 29, 1899. 
At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this society, held 
this day, a dividend has beendeclared at the rate of three and one-nuarter 
(3%) per cent per annum on all deposits for the six months ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1899, free from all taxes and payable on and after January 1, 1900. 

ROBERT J. TOBIN, Secretary. 
Ofliee: Corner Market, McAllister and Jones streets, San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Continental Building and Loan Association of California. 

The Continental Building and Loan Association of California has declared 
for the six months ending December 31, 1880, a dividend of 12 per cent per 
annum to class "A" stock, 10 per cent per annum to Class "P" stock, 6 per 
cent per annum on Term Deposits, and 5 per cent per annum on Ordinary 
Deposits. 

Capt. Oliver Eldridge. President. William Corbin, Secretary. 

Office: 222 Sansome street. San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 

For the half year ending December 31, 1899, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of three (3) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Tuesday, January 2. 1900. 

GEO. A. STORY. Cashier. 

Office: 33 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 
The Board of Directors declared n dividend for the term ending December 
31, 1899, at the rate of three and sixty one-hundredths (3 60) per cent per an- 
num on Term Deposits, and three (3) per cent per annum on Ordinary De- 
posits, free of taxes, and payable on and after January 2, 1900. Dividends 
not called for are added and to bear the same rate of dividend as the principal 
from and after January 1, 1900. 

CYRUS W. CARMANY, Cashier. 
Office: 101 Montgomery street. San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

For the half year ending with the 31st of December, 1899, a dividend ha 

been declared at the rate per annum of three and three-fourths (354) pe 

cent, on term deposits, and three and one-eighth (3%) per cent, on ordinary 

deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Tuesday. January 2, 1900. 

LOVELL WHITE. Cashier. 
Office: 532 California street, corner Webb, San Francisco, Cal. 



Priet ftw a>yy SS ante. 




Vol. LX 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20. 18S6 



Annual Suh*rri}<tior\. 1 




Nevm|§e-i|ter 




SAN FRANCISCO, JANUARY 27, 1900. 



Number 4. 



Printed »nd published every Saturday by the proprietor. FRED MARRIOTT 
street. Sun Francisco. Entered lit San Francisco Posl- 
ofllce as Sccond-olaas Matter. 
The oOlec of the NEWS LETTER in New York City is at 331 Park Row 
Blibr.. (Fred A. Marriott Eastern Representative), where information 
may be obtained regarding subscription and advertising rates. 
All social items, announcements, advertising, or other matter, intended for 
pttbtioation in the current number oi the NEWS LETTER, should bo 
'■■ thi« offloa not later than six o'clock Thursday afternoon. 

THE American missionary is being spnt to the Philip- 
pines to complete the work of the American soldier. 

IT is only natural that the British officer in South 
Africa who hasn't a title should be considered eccentric. 



SLIST of active participants at a pro-Boer meeting 
has much in common with the roster of a Hibernian 
picnic or Mulcahy's wake. 

THAT Rockefeller is to have a monopoly of lighting 
New York does not indicate that the metropolis is go- 
ing back to the oil lamp. 

PEOPLE who rant against the eating of meat have 
always the blessed consolation of knowing there is no 
ordinance forbidding a diet of baled hay. 

" / "pHIS man has a rubber tongue" is the head-line with 
1 which a local Sunday supplement baits the atten- 
tion of its rubber-necked readers. 



THE fact that France is buying American locomotives 
will go far towards controverting the theory of 
national degeneracy prevalent concerning that country. 

ftMERICA wants no "sphere of influence in China." 
China has a sphere of influence right here in San 
Francisco which is more than all the machinery of local, 
State and federal government can manage. 

GENERAL Mercier has received a decided rebuff from 
his countrymen, but he is still permitted to bear a 
sword, nor is his official residence on Devil's Island, so 
something in the process of justice is incomplete. 

S MICHIGAN church bounced its pastor for having put 
on the gloves with a pugilist. This course is hard to 
understand, for the preacher licked the pug, and was en- 
titled to the long end of the consequent emoluments. 



ft TEMPERANCE lecturer of Ohio has just died from 
the habitual use of morphine. His theories were 
beautiful but not comprehensive enough. The morphine 
route is even more deadly than that devoted to the 
cocktail. 



THE Americans lost a mule train of twenty animals and 
over a third of the guard attending in a recent brush 
with the Filipinos. The mule in modern warfare appears 
to have an unhappy faculty of getting over to the wrong 
side at the most inopportune moment. 

THE tailor who found four $100 bills in an unclaimed 
suit of clothes that had been sent to him to renovate, 
and turned the money over to the police, is something 
more than the ninth of an honest man. Had his name 
been anything more definite than Brown, we might have 
suspected a free ad. But this apparently is a case of un- 
complicated virtue, and the applause of the News Lettee 
will, we hope, compensate Honest Brown for all the names 
that will be hurled at him by the brothers of his pro- 
fession. 



BY killing her stage manager a young actress has found 
a cheap and picturesque way into the public prints and 
upon the lecture platform. Whither the manager found 
his way, and what be thinks about it, are collateral mat- 
ters, purely speculative, and perhaps of little consequence 
anyhow. 

MILLIONAIRE Plant of Florida willed a vast fortune 
to the child of his granddaughter, the grand- 
daughter being four years of age. If Plant was so green 
as to think such a will would escape contest aDd break- 
age, he should have been cremated. Placed in the ground, 
the certainty of his sprouting is obvious. 

HAWAII bids fair to become a second Transvaal. The 
Japanese Uitlanders are swarming by the thousands 
into this island paradise, and unless Uncle Sam adopts the 
Boerish attitute and refuses the franchise to the little 
brown men, they will speedily outvote the remainder of 
the community. 

SPOtTR line telegram, under a single head-line, an- 
nounced on Tuesday last that two banks had sus- 
pended in Connecticut. If that had occurred four years 
ago, during Cleveland's administration, it would have 
been given a seven-head display under circus poster type. 
Now, as of old, the ownership" of the gored ox makes a 
wonderful difference. 



REPRESENTATIVE White (colored) of. North Carolina 
has introduced a bill in the lower house of Congress 
making it treason to lynch, burn or torture a negro to 
death. A good companion bill to this measure would be 
one making certain unmentionable crimes practiced by 
negroes punishable by burning at the stake without bene- 
fit of clergy or the delay of jury. The two would balance 
nicely. 

CONAN DOYLE, the famous novelist, has added to his 
record one of the neatest bon mots which have been 
uttered during the present war. He is off to South 
Africa, armed, not with a rifle, but with a stethoscope. 
His admirers of the Authors' Club gave him a farewell 
dinner, at which he spoke warm but ironical words of 
praise in favor of Oom Paul. "Why should we punish 
Kruger 1 " he exclaimed. "That man has solved a trob- 
lem which every statesman has found unsolvable." True, 
and so Kruger is to go down to posterity famous as the 
man who saved the British Empire. Doyle would build a 
monument to him the size of St. Paul's, and carefully 
depositing the old Boer under it, would inscribe: "To the 
memory of the man who federated the British Empire." 

BY the terms of an ordinance submitted to the City 
Council of Chicago on the evening of January 16tb a 
reward of $200 is offered for the killing of any highwayman 
or housebreaker "detected in committing the crime or 
apprehended in an attempt to escape." Police officers and 
citizens alike are made the beneficiaries of this gentle 
plan for checking the growth of the long list of hold-ups 
and burglaries, and no incentive is offered for endeavors 
to capture the desperados alive. The spirit of the 
slaughter house is still strong in Chicago and if this ordin- 
ance is passed we can see hundreds of Armour's pig 
stickers will be quitting their jobs and devoting all their 
time to potting law breakers at $200 per. Give enter- 
prising Chicago a tong war like the present one in our 
own Chinatown and Mr. Armour would have highbinders 
to can. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 27, 11,00. 



SOCIETY, SYMPHONIES UNIONISM AND MUSIC TEACHERS. 

FOR several years now we have been having a more or 
less regular series of symphony concerts every sea- 
son. For these concerts we are indebted to what is com- 
monly called Society— with a large "S," if you please. 
The women of the social whirl took it into their heads that 
attending symphonies was the proper thing to do. Most 
of them didn't know a symphonic work from a coon song— 
but that didn't matter; tbey paid up their subscriptions 
and attended the concerts just the same. And the hangers- 
on and heelers of Society— those vague snobs that always 
read the lists of "among those present" at fashionable 
functions, and talk knowingly of the gilded swells, and 
attend every public pay-your-way entertainment at which 
Society is prone to gather — well, these cheap shadows of 
the Great trailed faithfully, and the symphony concerts 
were pecuniary successes, to say nothing about the artistic 
side of them. It so happened that music was the fashion- 
able attraction. Music is essentially an appeal to the 
emotions. The most beautiful, it is yet the most un- 
mental of all the arts. It does not require any more 
brains to listen knowingly to good music than it does to 
play it. The average musician is illiterate. So is the 
average actor. It takes exceptional brains and training 
to write good music, just as it takes them to write 
a good play. But it does not require exceptional gray 
matter on the part of the auditors to know these things 
when they see and hear them. It becomes a matter of 
taste and habit, just as one learns to know good dinners 
and good cigars. So, then, Society and its trailers took 
up the symphonies, and in the natural course of events 
learned how to applaud in the right place, learned how to 
be affected by the right combination of sound — received, 
as it were, a specialized education without pain; uncon- 
sciously, so gradual was its development. Until now the 
"best people" of San Francisco know almost as much 
about standard music as do the humblest peasants of 
Europe. We have even produced a performer and a 
singer or two worthy of serious consideration, and per- 
haps some day we will turn out a composer. Society has 
indeed done a handsome thing in the interests of music. 
But what have the musicians done for it? Nothing. Ab- 
solutely nothing. The bandsmen of the Musicians' Union 
have raised their prices every time there was an extra 
cent in sight. Knowing, as they must, that their very 
beer and cheese depend on the encouragement of the best 
in music, still these unioninnies would kill the goose that 
lays the golden egg to grasp the single coin in reach. 
Several times have they all but throttled the symphony 
enterprise by their greed. Now they are at its throat 
again with merciless fingers. The average cost of a 
symphony concert last year was $520. The cost of the 
concert given in the Grand Opera House a week ago 
Thursday afternoon was $1,060. That the orchestra is a 
little larger than it was last year does not excuse this ab- 
surd difference in cost. The average member of the 
Musicians' Union cares not a kettledrum's boom for music 
as music. There is no art in him. He plays as another 
man might saw wood, at so much per, carefully reckoned. 
These concerts take place in the afternoon, the rehearsals 
at hours arranged not to interfere with the regular work 
of the bandsmen, many of whom are employed at night in 
the various theatres and cafes. There is no reason why 
they should not go about their work with some token of 
devotion, especially when their personal future as well as 
that of music depends on it. But as it stands now the 
Musicians' Union is the most mutton-headed, grasping, 
noisy-throated labor organization in the city. If it were 
not for the generosity of some art-loving persons there 
would be no symphonies at all. And even angels tire of 
being good to the ungrateful. 

Another class of musicians who live by the public's appe- 
tite for sweet sound is composed of the music teachers. 
They, who pretend to love the art they teach, do abso- 
lutely nothing to further it. They, too, are mere money- 
making mechanics. Go to a symphony matinee and count 
the music teachers present. You can do it on your fingers, 
sometimes on your nose. The music teachers of San Fran- 
cisco know less about modern orchestral music than the 
scene shifters do about the modern drama. They retard 
civilization. Their influence is narrow and bad. They are 



with mighty few exceptions the plumbers and gas-fitters 
of art, unwilling to accept education in their own craft 
when it is right at their very door. 

That we have an occasional opportunity to hear real 
music in San Francisco is no fault of the bandsman, no 
fault of the teacher. Society is responsible. The News 
Letter is no snob, but on this occasion its hat is off to 
Society. 

THE EXTRA SESSION CALLED AT LAST. 

GOVERNOR GAGE has done what was generally ex- 
pected of him. He has called an extra session of the 
Legislature to meet at the State Capital on Monday next. 
As the constitution requires, the Governor's proclamation 
names the business to which Senators and Assemblymen 
are expected to confine their attention. It is a more 
formidable document than has heretofore been deemed 
necessary for the recalling of the Legislature to business. 
A notable exception to the ordinary rule is that Governor 
Gage gives the drafts of the measures which he calls upon 
members to pass verbatim et literatum. This certainly looks 
like an encroachment by the executive upon the legislative 
branch of the government, and surely cannot be binding 
upon anybody. If members are not inclined to settle 
down to work they may accept the bills drawn by the 
Governor, but if they are tenacious of their privileges, as 
Legislators usually are,they will insist upon framing their 
own bills. They will be exceedingly liable to resent the 
idea that they have been merely called together to enact 
not only the ideas, but the very words and language of 
one man. Still they might do worse. The great need of 
the Legislature is that it should have the permanent ser- 
vices of an expert draftsman who would keep the statute 
book homogeneous, workable and consistent. The Gov- 
ernor is a capable lawyer, and, in this case, may well be 
accepted as the Legislature's expert. If he is, the 
present Harbor Board will pass out of existenee, and a 
new commission will take its place that need not be con- 
firmed in office by the Legislature. A like change will take 
place in regard to the various boards of State charities. 
Of course, the principal purpose of the extra session is to 
elect a United States Senator. It is presumed that the 
Governor has reason to believe that it is now ready to 
accomplish that which it failed to do at the regular 
session. It is understood that the majority are ready 
to obey the party custom and go into caucus. It looks 
as if Colonel Dan M. Burns has the longest pole and will 
bring down the persimmon. 



THE WAR NEWS. 



THE news from the seat of war in the Transvaal dur- 
ing the week has not been of a satisfying character. 
But this condition of things cannot last long, and may 
even be changed by the time this meets the reader's eye. 
The parties in conflict confront each other too closely to 
permit of a clash being averted for any considerable per- 
iod of time. The several commands into which the British 
forces are divided are known to be on the move, and the 
relief of Ladysmith is liable to happen at any moment. 
The Tugela river has been crossed in two places, and Gen- 
eral Buller has moved up closer, and is now within strik- 
ing distance of the beleaguered city which General White 
has so gallantly defended. The Boers are strongly in- 
trenched around the city, and no doubt a bloody battle will 
have to be fought in order to dislodge them, but with their 
enemies at their front and rear, the issue ought not to 
be in doubt. It may even be that the Boers may retreat 
from their position after they find it has become unten- 
able. If it be true, as it seems to be, that the British 
are about to extricate themselves from their unfortunate 
position amidst the mountain ranges that separate Natal 
from the Transvaal veldt, there will be quick changes of 
base and perhaps a remodeling of the whole plan of cam- 
paign. It will not have escaped notice that Generals 
Roberts and Kitchener have not interfered with the Gen- 
erals at the front, but are still at the head of the forces 
in Cape Colony. What move they contemplate making is 
kept a profound secret, but with 50,000 men at their com- 
mand it is certain that they mean to strike a blow some- 
where. That they intend to relieve Kimberley and attack 
the Orange Free State is more than probable. The Boers 



January 27, 1900. 



s\n i Kwrisco raWS LETTER 



oow in the mountains of Natal would have to go to the 
rescue, and the scene of hostilities would at once be 
shifted. The question would then arise as to whsr 
!er, White. Warren. Gatacre and the other Generals 
would do. They wou'd certainly reach the open veldt, ami 
then the way would be open to them to Pretoria. Rob- 
ert* is now 1 1 the south of that place, whilst the other and 
better known British forces are to the north of it. It 
looks as if the British plan of campaign is Involving an at- 
tack upon the Transvaal on both sides. The Boers have 
no outlet either east or west. They have been estopped 
on their eastern boundary, and to go west they cannot, 
because they would encounter countless numbers of hostile 
blacks. Their fighting ground must be northwards am 
southwards. Roberts and Kitchener are on the one side 
of them, and Buller and White on the other. With these 
two superior forces to encounter, and no shelter on the 
open veldt, it would seem that the war cannot be greatly 
prolonged, and that the British must win. 



DEATH OF WAR CORRESPONDENT STEEVENS. 

"/"^ W. Steevens, correspondent of the London Daily 
\di Mail, has died in Ladysmith of enteric fever." A 
bald enough statement to be cabled round the world, of 
little seeming importance amid wars and rumors of wars. 
Yet to the general reader that brief cable brings a sense 
of personal loss, announcing as it does that the Macaulay 
of modern journalism has passed away in an everlasting 
"flash of silence." There is none left to do for us tbat 
which Steevens did. War correspondents we have indeed, 
of every shade, and among them some few who hold 
graphic, dashing, even poetic pens. But, so far, none has 
arisen, like Steevens, with the very wine of war stirring 
in his veins and thrilling his brain with inspired witchery. 
He could cast a glamor over the ghastly battlefield; he 
carried his readers breathlessly through the stubborn 
fight, the reckless charge, the heedless rout; he could 
bring you to stand side by side with the soldier amid the 
horrors of carnage, and so intoxicate you with the fumes 
of gunpowder, the magnetism of infuriated courage that 
your eyes were sealed to sickening surroundings. And he 
of all others brought you into personal contact with 
Tommy Atkins and his leaders, showed the strength of the 
bond that knits man toman on the field of war, taught 
you to understand the depths of the simple soldier heart, 
which, in the hour of pain and suffering only asks: "did we 
make a good fight, sir?" None who have accompanied 
Steevens "with Kitchener to Khartoum" can ever forget 
the thrills with which the British tramped the desert, 
broke through the mimosa of the zariba, shared the wild 
charge of the Lancers, gazed in the fierce faces of gasping 
dervishes— thanks to the magic of his pen. And this 
magic is probably to be explained by the writer's unselfish- 
ness. Self assertion, and self consciousness, the banes of 
so many journalists he entirely lacked; mind and heart 
were focussed on the doings of others till his very life was 
absorbed in theirs. And now he is dead. Dead, not on 
the battlefield, amid the valiant deeds his soul responded 
to, but dead ignominiously, of ordinary fever, in the gallant 
little besieged city to which all eyes are turning. The 
pity o't! 

THE GROWTH OF THE AUSTRALIAN STEAM SERVICE. 

THE Oceanic Steamship Company, better known as the 
Spreckels Company, has just made a very pleasing 
showing of the really wonderful increase in its Pacific 
Ocean trade during the past year. At a meeting of the 
stockholders held on Monday last the president of the com- 
pany, Mr. John D. Spreckels, reported that the total net 
earnings for 1899 were $374,745. In the net earnings on 
the through line between here, Hawaii, New Zealand and 
Australia the increase for the year amounts to $101,401, 
or about 63 per cent. There is now in the treasury 
$296,547, as against $222,901 in January of last year. The 
requirements of the trade have outgrown the present 
capacity of the company, but fortunately the stockholders 
anticipating the state of affairs at their last annual meet- 
ing, authorized the building of three new first-class steam- 
ers of enlarged capacity and great speed. It is promised 
that they will be the peers of any ships steaming on this 



ocean. The first of these will be launched in a fen 
and will be ready to take up Mm running on June 

It will be followed two months later by the second 
and four months later by the third. Since they were con- 
tracted for the prices of iron and steel have appro 
considerably, and the contracts could not now be dupli- 
cated for less than 25 per rent increase. When the new 
ships are all 00 the route it is intended that there shall be 
seventeen round trips during the year, instead of thirteen 
as at present, and the time is to be shortened so as to 
equal anything that can be done via the Suez Canal. The 
New Zealand government still stands by the San Fran- 
cisco service in preference to any other and the Parlia- 
ment of that colony is prepared to vote it a subsidy of 
1150.000 per annum. The Alameda and Mariposa, now 
engaged in this service, are to be fitted with new boilers 
and otherwise improved, and will take up the inter-island 
trade. All this is in line with the new era of Pacific Coast 
commerce that is now upon us. Our merchants and 
traders have obviously aroused themselves to the possi- 
bilities that confront them. We see what the beginning 
is, but no man to-day can set the bounds of the future. 
The new three-weekly service to Australia might easily be 
made to expand it to- a weekly one within the next three 
years. We have hardly yet tapped the trade of the An- 
tipodes. Its outflow will some day astonish the natives, and 
greatly enrich California. Already much of its gold is com- 
ing this way, and its surplus products will necessarily fol- 
low suit. 



HOW THE UAWTON FUND GROWS. 

IT is surprising how the Lawton fund grows. Two weeks 
ago Adjutant-General Corbin had already $80,000 in 
his hands, and from the way in which subscriptions were 
pouring in, it is probable that the fund will hardly fall 
short of $100,000. The quiet, unostentatious manner in 
which this fund has been raised does credit to the nation, 
and honor to the memory of General Lawton, who would 
have had money enough to have left his family in comfort 
had he not been a man of the most scrupulous sense of 
honor. Twenty years ago, or thereabouts, he invested 
money in a mining enterprise, and he persuaded many of 
his friends to join him in capitalizing the mine. The ven- 
ture did not succeed, and he lost all of his own money, and 
that of his friends went with it. He assumed their losses 
as personal debts, and he thenceforward devoted himself 
to liquidating them. The friends said that he was under 
no obligation to reimburse them, as they had taken the 
risk equally with himself. He said "No, they had acted 
on his information and judgment, and that as he had 
allowed himself to be imposed upon, he could not think of 
allowing his friends to suffer by his error." For years he 
lived simply and economically, saving at every possible 
point, and turning over every available dollar to pay his 
assumed debts. At the time of his death at the Philip- 
pines he had practically accomplished his task. His debts 
of honor were almost paid, but he was a poor man except 
in self-respect, and in the admiration of all those who 
knew the sacrifices he had made. His family were de- 
pendent on his life, and his wife knew it. But she did not 
begrudge his course. It was with her consent and assist- 
ance that he prevented his friends losing money on his 
account. The need of General Lawton's family is one of 
its glorious inheritances, and the quickness with which a 
large sum was raised to meet it indicates that honor is 
still appreciated and prized. The friends whom he paid have 
been contributors to the fund and men of wealth familiar 
with the facts have of their own accord shown respeot for 
a man who was loyal to his own high standard of moral 
obligation. But he was a simple, plain soldier, who, as he 
said of himself, "was not a hero, but a regular," who 
knew not the sophistries and subterfuges of more compli- 
cated natures, and he simply did that which he felt to be 
right. The records of the war have shown us no greater 
hero. 

THE ways of the law are many and slippery. Oscar 
Newhouse, the one-time employee of E. A. Wiltsee, 
the mining man, has been acquitted of the charge of 
forgery by Judge Dunne, because, forsooth, "he was 
guilty of some other offense." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 27, 1900. 



MUNICIPAL CONTROL OF PUBLIC UTILITIES. 

IF Mayor Phelan's policy goes through to the end with 
anything like the success that has attended it so far, it 
will not be long before all our public uti'ities are under the 
control of the municipality. Whether this will be a good 
thing or a bad one depends very largely upon the kind of 
civil service the city can command. At present the out- 
look is not as promising as it might be. The kind of men 
who are seeking examinations for deputyships are not of 
that high order of virtue that would inspire any great 
confidence in their integrity when in charge of great pub- 
lic properties. Besides, are we prepared to pay the 
prices that would induce men of great executive ability 
to enter the public service? If the city's water supply is 
ever to come under municipal control, the head of the de- 
partment, if the right man be secured, ought to be paid a 
salary equal to that which Spring Valley has been accus- 
tomed to pay its President. Corporations know the best 
talent when they see it, and are not afraid to pay for it. 
The same thing may not be said of municipalities. At the 
extra session called for the purpose an attempt is to be 
made to bring the city front within the jurisdiction of our 
Supervisors. This may prove better than the present 
plan, but experience elsewhere does not point to that con- 
clusion. The dock department of the city of New York is 
a municipal institution. It has been in existence twenty- 
eight years, during which period its revenues have 
amounted to $34,000,000; yet that large income has not 
sufficed. The New York Sun in a recent issue says: "The 
total loss to the city up to date on its ownership of the 
docks has been about $16,000,000. This is in spite of an 
unexampled city front and excellent terminal facilities and 
improvements effected bv the general Government. In 
no private business conducted on a free capital in start- 
ing of perhaps $25,000,000, exempted from all taxes and 
purchase of lands, would a resultant loss in twenty-eight 
years of $10,000,000 be considered a success, and this not- 
withstanding the city's commerce has broken all previous 
precedents. Contrast this showing of the dock depart- 
ment with the. advances made in the same period in trans- 
portation, illumination, and other semi-public industries 
controlled by private enterprise ! In point of fact, the 
business men of New York regard the dock department 
to be a wretched failure, and at the various conventions 
and gatherings of the commercial societies the view uni- 
formly taken is that the present condition of the depart- 
ment is the inevitable result of the principle of municipal 
ownership and control. All real incentive to progress 
and effort is removed by that system." 

That is certainly a showing that does not say much for 
municipal control. Philadelphia has had even a worse ex- 
perience with the ownership of her gas works. Jobbery, 
corruption, frightful pecuniary loss, and all manner of evil 
sprarig out of that ownership, and at last she has been 
compelled to lease her plant for a term of years to a com- 
pany. It may be said that New York and Philadelphia 
are frightfully corrupt, and that San Francisco is not like 
unto them. But of the latter statement there is no evi- 
dence. We know of no public work ever carried through 
in this city that was not to a greater or lesser extent the 
subject ot fraud and wrong. Even at this very moment 
our city has to pay for the food and medicine supplied to 
her hospital about twice as much as would be charged 
private individuals, and the supplies are bad in quality and 
short in weight and measure at that. Yet it is but fair to 
admit that municipal control works well in some places. 
The docks of Liverpool are right well managed by the 
city. Birmingham, Manchester, and Glasgow own most 
of their public utilities to their own great advantage and 
to the satisfaction of their people. The principle of munici- 
pal control is certainly spreading in Great Britain Here 
is an example, copied from the Brooklyn Eagle of January 
luth last: "In Huddersfield, England, each artisan lives 
; in a house owned by the city, comes home to his house from 
his place of work on a municipal car, gets his gas or elec- 
tricity, whether for light or heating or cooking, from the 
- municipal mains and wires, buys his meat from the munici- 
j. pal butcher, takes his bath in a municipal bath house en- 
joys his leisure in a municipal park; when ill goes to' the 
; municipal hospital, and when poor is taken to the munici- 
Ut pal lodging house." Huddersfield is the principal manu- 



facturing town in Yorkshire. Judging from the above ac- 
count it ought to be an interesting place for economic 
study. But Huddersfield is not San Francisco — no, not by 
a great deal ! 

OUR OLD FRIEND THE FENIAN RAID. 

THE eastern newspapers are making merry over the 
threatened Fenian raid into Canada. The majority 
of them seem to take it as an excellent specimen of Irish 
humor. One paper suggests that "the proposed Fenian 
army of 100,000 men could best be mobilized in the saloons 
of New York, Boston and Buffalo, and there drilled in 
mcdern tactics." Another says that "if the invaders es- 
caped both the United States and Canadian troops, they 
would have to occupy a Canadian city which is well 
supplied with saloons and restaurants and establish a base 
there, but an army of such great size would quickly con- 
sume everything in sight to eat and drink, and it would be 
necessary to capture another city. Then having taken 
all Canada the question would arise as to what to do with 
it. As soon as the invaders organized a government, and 
occupied the offices, disputes would arise, and the various 
factions would quarrel among themselves and try to sell 
out to the British, and the whole thing would end in a 
joke." That is all very well, but why should not the word 
of our good friend, the Fenian, be taken like that of any 
other gentleman? He appears to have given up plotting 
and secret ways, and assumes to be as frank and open as 
a penitent at the confessional. An officer of the Clan-n a- 
Gael has had himself interviewed by the New York Even- 
ing Post and had this to say: — "We did intend going out 
and sinking that first expedition from Canada to South 
Africa, but thought it better to wait awhile and attack 
Canada when the military were gone. We can mobilize 
our men quickly, and we are as well armed as the United 
States troops were in the Spanish war. We have lots of 
Springfields and are handy with the bayonet. We have 
regiments or companies all over the United States. The 
Ancient Order of Hibernians numbers about 250,000, and 
most of them belong to our organization. All its officers 
do, and they of course would act with us. We have lots of 
men in the regular army. We have camps or clubs in 
every post, and if they were sent to stop us on the border, 
they would either march across with us or give us blank 
cartridge. Our own countrymen in Canada and the 
French population would welcome us. We would have the 
Canadian loyalists on the run in a week." More power to 
his elbow, for he is a brave Fenian boy! But hold awhile I 
He talks too much for a good Fenian. It is more likely 
that he is a La Caron in disguise. 



"WHAT WOULD JESUS DO?" 

THE QUESTION: "What would Jesus do?" under 
different sets of prescribed conditions, has been 
bandied about by professionally good people in a manner 
shocking even to the unbeliever, who yet retains a feeling 
of reverence for a name representing at least a gracious 
and benign personality, a matchless teacher of morals, to 
an important share of humanity, the Son of God. What 
Jesus would do is important only as a theory, for those 
who determine to their own satisfaction, what it would be, 
make no attempt to follow the course themselves. Jesus 
evidently never had in mind the church as a social club or 
the prayer meeting as a function. The latest adaptation 
of this sacrilegious query is as to the running of a news- 
paper, and a Kansas minister will lake charge of a secular 
daily, directing it in all departments on the lines that he 
thinks Jesus would have done. There is something de- 
pressing in this folly. Anybody who is equipped to re- 
flect knows that Jesus would have had nothing more to do 
with modern journalism than with the running of a saloon. 
If he could be imagined in charge of a paper, he could 
follow his own counsel only by selling the outfit and giving 
the results to the poor. A modern paper may be 
governed by ethics of decency. It may be on a lofty moral 
plane. Intellectually, it may be fitted to instruct; but 
this is all. The effort to conduct it as "Jesus would" is 
insulting both to the world of thought and to a cause 
deemed holy. 



January 27, 1900. 



S\\ FRANCIS* NKWS LETT! B 




35? Automobiles 



TO THE FRONT 



NOT so very long ago it was predicted in this column that 
the following of fashions of "the Prince's set' ' in London 
by rapid New Yorkers was sure to eventuate sooner or 
later. This would seem to have become an accomplished fact, 
if all we hear from Gotham be true; married women go about 
without their husbands in one direction while the husbands 
6nd thpir pleasure in opposite directions. Wonder is ex- 
pressed will such a state of affairs reach San Francisco. 
Most assuredly it will, nay, already has. Apropos of New 
York gaieties, Items from that city declare that Mrs. 
Herman Oelrichs has in contemplation ere her departure 
for Europe a magnificent entertainment to be given in 
honor of her sister-in-law, Mrs. Charles L. Pair. 

* * * 

One of the most delightful things which has happened in 
ages was lately, when a noted advocate of women's rights 
openly advised women to seek to improve the conditions 
of their own homes before taking up the burden of the 
community. When girls learn that happiness lies at the 
domestic fireside rather than in matinees and office work, 
we may hope for a revival of the " happy home" period 
our progenitors tell of, but which, alas, seems to be fast 
dying out. 

* * * 

" Yes," said a sour man at the club the other day, "the 
South African war has not been an unmixed evil to us at 
any rate." "How do you make that out?" asked his friend. 
"Oh, don't you see the influx of British tourists has per- 
ceptibly lessened, and will soon cease, and I for one am 
not sorry these chaps with baggy pants and supercilious 
airs should be more noted for absence than presence." 

* * * 

Prank Coffin, the ladies' pet tenor, seems to have chosen 
wisely in entering upon a song recital career right here in 
his own city, for the number of would-be vocal artists who 
leave here for "study in Europe" annually, reminds one 
of the ten lepers of the Bible story where only one re- 
turned out of those that went forth. 

* * * 

Gossip has been very busy of late in matching couples 
for Hymen's chains; thus we hear of the capture in the 
East of an ex-Senator of this State; and another report 
is that a very distinguished member of our legal fraternity 
will bring a wife to the cozy nest he has so long dwelt in — 

presumably by his lonely. 

* * # 

A long-absent Californian was saying the other day, 
when discussing the vast changes he found in the city both 
socially and architecturally, that of all the things which 
gave him most pleasure it was reading over an old direc- 
tory he found in a friend's bookshelves. "Why, Darwin 
isn't in it with the evolution evidenced by Langley." 

* * * 

On dit, a certain unmarried woman, who has long been 
the object of a capitalist's devotion, has been studying 
Romeo and Juliet recently, because she finds the phrase 
"give you good morrow" in it, and that is what society 
says she will eventually get — whether it will be a good one 
is a debatable question. 

* # # 

A certain recently appointed official had better be 
extremely careful in his actions (this in a spirit of 
pure kindliness), for it is much easier to be risky with a 
wife in the country than when she is on the ground, so to 
speak. 

To Cure A Cold In One Day 
Take Laxative Bromo Quinine Tablets. All druggists refund the 
money if it fails to cure. E. W. Grove's signature is on each box. 
25 cents. 

Ah excellent commercial lunch is served daily by Fay & Foster at 
the Grand Hotel Cafe. The cooking is notably good and the service 
by trained colored waiters is careful and quiet. The quality of the 
beverages served from the Grand Hotel Bar needs no bush. 



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FRENCH LIBRARY AND FRENCH CLASSES 

This library is the most important of its kind, containing 20,000 books. 
Among them are the best ancient and latest authors. Under the auspices 
of the library are French classes for adults only, afternoons and evenings. 
Graduate teachers from France give tuition. Terms for library, 8l admission. 
50 cents monthly. Terms for classes— $3 a month, 2 lessons a week, entitling 
pupils to literary membership. Apply— French Library, City of Paris Build- 
ing, 135 Geary street. 

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SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 27, 1900. 




"We obey no wand but Pleasure's.'"— Tom Moore. 

OUR respectable friends, the Frawleys, have, after try- 
ing everything else, come down to naughty French 
farce, and scored the first positive pecuniary success of 
their season. The critics of the dailies mentioned the 
naughtiness with no soft pencil, but admitted the clever- 
ness of the piece, which is incontestable; and so In Para- 
dise has flocked the house and will be kept on for another 
week. "Everybody kicks because San Francisco doesn't 
get what New York gets," said Mr. Frawley, "so now 
I'll give them some of the regulation metropolitan hot- 
stuff." And he served it up in real tobasco style and the 
town turned out to be shocked. It so happens that In 
Paradise is clever as well as risky, else I fear there would 
be no wild throng clamoring for seats at the California's 
box office; for as I have frequently observed the people of 
San Francisco do not care a prune for dirt for dirt's sake. 
Neither do the police. The Turtle you will remember 
proved a lobster, but Mile. Fifi which was keen and witty 
was applauded on all sides. In Paradise is witty and 
wicked, but well within the law and a good night's fun for 
anybody but the very young. The sort of happy-go-lucky 
French morals that it pictures are soon enough found out 
anyway. The French farce writers have a trick of 
handling without gloves a situation that no serious 
dramatist would dare put on the stage. They do it in the 
comic spirit, there is no tragedy, no consequences; every- 
thing is funny. Lovers, cuckolds and ladies of pleasure 
flood the scenes [and make merry with the most sacred 
passions and ideas of life. They wear their night clothes 
with cheerful abandon, and discuss unbiushingly the 
secrets of the alcove. Old gentlemen with carnal fads are 
made out to be the funniest fellows in the world; and 
women whose pasts and presents are below reproach ply 
their blandishments and professions with little reserve. 
The naughty French farce leaves little to the imagination. 
It is intended to be verbally and physically suggestive. 
And In Paradise is a good sample of the best (or should I 
say the worst?) that is being made in Paris in the end of 
century. 

* * * 

In Paradise has been Englished without shame or fumi- 
gation. "This is a whiff of dear old Paris," said a 
Frenchman to me when the three principal male charac- 
ters put on pajamas and jumped into the model's bed. 
Everything is treated with entire frankness, and it is not 
necessary to ask questions. How the three suits of 
pajamas are so ready at band in this young woman's 
apartment is not explained. That she has two lovers and 
an obliging husband is also a fact that is presented with- 
out apology. The piece has its own code of immorals ana 
lives up to it in the most trustful spirit imaginable. You 
may blush a bit if you are given to that tell-tale habit 
but on the whole you are not shocKed. The farce makes 
fun of a world wholly different from our own— a world 
that really exists only on the Parisiaa stage It is 
naughty, wicked and fantastical. Presented in a straight- 
away, plausible manner it would be merely tough. 

# * * 

I was surprised at the lightness and excellence of the 
Frawley performance. FortUDately for this production 
Theodore Hamilton had been prominently associated with 
the original one in New York: and beside playino- his own 
part with unction and devilment, he has coached the com 
pany generally in the little tricks of stage business that 
count for so much. All in all, the acting is far beyond 
that of the usual stock company in a piece of this char 
acter. As the principal old roue, Mr. Hamilton is out- 
rageously good. As a rule these senile lechers of the stage 
are pathetic rather than amusing, but Mr. Hamilton— an 
artist at all times save when he fails to exact from him 
self the best of which he is capable— gives this one a tone 
of geniality that wins you in spite of your better nature 
Mr. Armory, too, contributes a taking personation in the 
oldster who has long yearned to snuggle with a real 



chorus girl. And as the artist's model, in whose rooms 
are found the famous bed and pajamas, Mary Van Buren 
shows another precious phase of her versatility. The 
more I see of this clever young woman the better I like 
her work. It improves week by week, and in the wide 
assortment of parts this season I have yet been spared 
the pain of chronicling a single failure. Of course many 
good people will say that Miss Van Buren is altogether 
too delicate and sensitive a player to be wasted on a flip- 
pant, risky part like this one; but with them I don't agree 
a little bit. It is all part of the experience. The greater 
the range of roles the better the player finds out his possi- 
bilities and limitations, and there is always technique to 
be learned. Miss Van Buren throws herself into the 
Frenchy fun of the model with an idea of bringing out of 
the part all that it is worth; and she does it. Her per- 
formance is daringly, delightfully live. 



Masterpiece, masterpiece, masterpiece I Oh that bogie 
word masterpiece 1 Pardon these exclamations, reader, 
dear, but I can't help them. I wish that such words as mas- 
terpieec and classic had no place in our language. I'll give 
real money to the man who will invent a way by which they 
may be lost. They are the bane of good art and good 
criticism. In the matter of theatricals they have boiled 
my bad blood oftener than anything else in my polka-dot- 
ted career. Out with them 1 

Because The School for Scandal is written by Richard 
Brindsley Sheridan, is a hundred years old, and is still a 
good, actable comedy, it is called a "classic" and actors are 
expected to play it reverently, religiously you might say. 
That good Irishman, Sheridan, must turn a flip-flop in bis 
grave every time one of his plays is put in performance — 
not on account of the acting, but the criticism that follows 
the acting. Because Mr. James has, after years of over- 
posed staginess, come down to earth and plays Charles 
Surface with the easy colloquial, daredevil humanness that 
the author indicates in every line, my friend Porter Gar- 
nett of the Call calls him a vandal. "Vandal James" is 
the indignant head line to his flood of protest in last Tues- 
day's C?ll. And I once thought Garnett a modern of the 
crispest kind I Was he not among those present in 
Gillette Burgess' purple cowyard ? Has he not a hun- 
dred times raised his tenor voice in objection to cant, 
convention, Phillistinism ? And now just as Louis James 
has made up his mind to unlearn all the stale stupid tricks 
of a convention-ridden stage and settle down to a fair, 
honest imitation of man as we find him at large, outcomes 
Mr. Garnett to turn the hose of his wrath upon him. 
How am I to teach the old actor how to act if my colleagues 
keep chipping in in this absurd fashion ? 

* # * 

Mr. James' Charles Surface is even better than it was 
last year. It is full of healthy, husky fun — just the kind of 
acting that tends to re-popularize the good comedians of 
the past. Even the rankest traditionalist would not, I 
hope, like to see the players masked and on stilts as in the 
heroic days of old. Mr. James' acting in this play is 
honest and straightforward. His Charles is neither an 
overposed lobster nor a Beau Brummel. Neither is the 
Charles in Sheridan's play. 

* * * 

Miss Kidder, as before, overrefines Lady Teazle and 
loses the contrast and a great deal of fun. But taken 
altogether the performance on Monday night in the 
Columbia was picturesque, intelligent and painstaking. 



The stock company at the Alcazar has put in a usual 
week with Lord Chumley a play that has almost if not 
quite exhausted its usefulness. In the eccentric title 
part Mr. Hastings was entertaining without being en- 
thralling, and the rest of the cast contributed a safe sup- 
port. Next week's bill promises to be more interesting. 
It is Peaceful Vidley, with Mr. Hastings in the Sol Smith 
Russell part. He did it a year or two ago in the same 
theatre with the best of results. I notice that the Alcazar 
has gradually built up a faithful clientele of its own. In 
its quiet little way it is one of the most successful theatres 
in the city. 



January »7, 1900. 



SAN FRANCIS • NEWS LETTER. 



Tntv-i- are tbe days of good attractions at the Or 
pheum, and next week's bill promises big things. Kverv 
act is a headliner, every performer a star. Bruet and 
Reviere, who head the new bill, are French duettists and 
mimics. The Holloways, who come direct from Berlin, 
will present one of the latest European acrobatic novel- 
ties. They perform on the wire and on revolving ladders, 
and their act is said to be the most sensational on the 
road. Maud and Augustus Sehlke will present a novelty 
in the shape of an act by five carefully trained pickanin- 
nies. Irene Franklin, the dashing little soubrette, who 
needs no introduction to San Francisco people, completes 
the list of newcomers. The holdovers are: Papinta, James 
O. Barrows & Co., Edna Bassett Marshall & Co., and 
J. Newman. 



The Louis James-Kathryn Kidder-Charles B. Hanford 
combination will enter upon the third and final week of its 
engagement at the Columbia Theatre on Monday night. A 
splendid repertory has been arranged for the week of no 
less than five different plays. On Monday and Friday 
evenings The Rivals will hold the boards, with James as 
Fighting Bob Acres, Miss Kidder as Lydia Languish, 
Hanford as Captain Absolute, and Mrs. Vandenhoff as 
Mrs. Malaprop. Othello is to be given on Tuesday night. 
A special Wednesday matinee of The Winter's Tale is an- 
nounced, and the same bill will be given on Thursday and 
Saturday nights. On Wednesday night and at the matinee 
on Saturday The School for Scandal will be presented. The 
farewell performance on Sunday night is to be Macbeth. 
* * * 

The Tivoli is noted for record-breaking runs, and The 
Idol's Eye is rapidly coming to the front in the list, as the 
third week of the opera is announced, commencing with 
next Monday evening. The most confirmed cynic, after 
witnessing the Tivoli's presentation of The Idol's Eye, is 
forced to admit that it is one of the funniest and best 
played comic operas ever produced in this city. Frank 
Daniels and his New York Company made a big hit in The 
Idol's Eye when it was given in this city last year. Many 
who saw Daniels and his company say that it would war- 
rant the Tivoh management to take its company some day 
to New York and boldly challenge that city of "produc- 
tions" for its verdict. With such a success as the Tivoli 
now has in The Idol's Eye. and the heavy advance sale of 
seats, the Tivoli is not likely to change its bill for many 
weeks to come. 



The second of the series of the Symphony concerts under 
the direction of Henry Holmes will take place at the 
Grand Opera House next Thursday afternoon at 3:15. The 
programme will include Tschaikowsky's "Romeo and 
Juliet" Fantasia; the Symphony "Eroica" of Beethoven; 
two movements from Schubert's Unfinished Symphony, 
and Cherubini's Overture — "Les Abencerrages. " The 
orchestra will be increased to the number of seventy. 

Madam Gadski, David Bispham, and Walter Damrosch, 
will be heard in a series of concerts at the California 
Theatre early in March. Paderewski comes the latter 
part of that month. 

Mrs. Adelaide Lloyd Smith, dramatic soprano, assisted 
by the Minetti String Quartet and Cantor E. J. Stark, 
baritone, will give a concert at the Sherman Clay Hall, 
Tuesday evening, February 6th. 



THIS is the time to buy dry goods, while the big sale is 
on at J. J. O'Brien's. Golf capes in all variety, 
woolen waists, all kinds of dress fabrics, towels, under- 
wear, hosiery, laces, gloves, trimmings — in fact, every- 
thing that is to be had at a first-class dry goods estab- 
lishment is on sale at J. J. O'Brien's at sensationally low 
prices. The honored name of this great store assures 
every visitor fair dealing and polite attention. There is 
one department devoted exclusively to the sale of men's 
haberdashery and underwear. Good, warm underwear is 
a safe thing to have next to one this kind of weather. 

The Queen of Beautifiers is a most appropriate title for Camelline. 
It improves any complexion, is harmless, and snch people as Ade- 
»ina Patti, Ellen Terry, and Mrs. Kendall recommend it. 



The . . . n..ur*: 

Osteopathic Institute 

Dr. A. C. Moore, Or, J. F. Hancy, A. T. Moore. Secretary. 
Chronic Diseases and Deformities SUCCESSFULLY treated. 
204 Sutter St., San Francisco. Phone, Main 100. 

G_| 1Im L' TU,!..^ Oottlob, Marx A Co.. 
OlUmDia I heatre. Lowe©* and Managers. 

Beginning Monday, January 80th, third and last week of 
LOUIS cJAMES 
KrtTHRYN KIDDER 
CHARLES B. HANFORD 
and n company "i thirty-seven people, Monday and Friday 
nielils, Thk Rivals; Tuesday night, Othbllo; Special mntinee 
Wednesday, also ThurHiin> and Saturday nik'htj*. Tub Wintkob 
Talk. Wednesday night and matinee Saturday, The Scnooi. 
pon s< am. \r,. Sunday night, Macbeth. 

February 5th— The famous original BosTONIANS. 

G-*ll-P~,-~!-, Tk«ni^ THE POPULAR HOUSE. 
allTOmia I neaXre. Reservations by 'Phone, Main 1731 

Received with roars of laughter! One week more ! 

The Frawley Company in the uproariously funny farce comedy 

from the French, 

IN PARADISE. 

Two years In Paris; fourteen months in London; seven months 

in New York city, 

Sunday night, Feb, 4th— The Cuckoo. Prices same as ever. 

nL,„„ T U « — 4- — « Bel asco & Th all, Managers. 

rAlcazar I neatre. phone,Mam2M 

Week of January 29th. " Just dropped in on mother." Sol. 
Smith Russell's successful comedy, 

PEACEFUL UALLEY 

With all brand new scenery. 
Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 
Alcazar Prices— 15e., 25o., 35c„ 60c. 

TI./-J' 0^«* . H~..«« Mbs. Ernebtine Krblinok 
I VOl I UDera riOUSe. Proprietor and Manager. 

" Hoot Mon, Ye Oanna Lose Me ! " Playing to crowded houses 
nightly. Third week of the enormous comic opera success, 

THE IDOL'S EYE 

Commencing Monday evening, January 29th. 

Every evening and Saturday matinee. 

Popular Prices— 25c. and 50c. Telephone for seats. Bush 9. 

Grand Opera house-Special. 

Thursday afternoon, February 1st, at 3:15. Second of the series of 

SYMPHONY C0NGERT8 

Under the direction of Henry Holmes. Augmented orchestra, 
Sevent y musicians. 

Reserved Seats: 25e., 50c., 75c, Si, and $1.50. Special prices for 
the season. Sale begins at . Sherman, Clay &. Co.'s music store 
this Saturday morning, at 9 o'clock. 

Ow U ^ *«. San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. 
I P n 6 U m . O'Farrell St.. between Stockton and Powell streets. 



The Holloways 
Irene Franklin 



Sehlke's Pickaninnies 
Papinta 

BRUET X REUIERE 

Edna Bassett Marshall & Co. 



James O. Barrows & Co. 

J. Newman 

Reserved Seats 25c.; balcony 10o.; opera chairs and box seats 50c. 

Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 

After the Theatre 

Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to Stark's matchless string band and enjoy the finest 

wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand is society's gathering place after the show is 

ovea. 

H. ISaaC JoneS, M. D. Eye. Ear, Nose, and Throat. 

Office — 234 Post street, between Grant avenue and Stockton 

streets, S. F. Hours, 10 a. m. to 4. p. m. 

Sunday by appointment. Tel. Grant 10 

School of Elocution 

Miss Elizabeth McDonald, 1927 California St. 
Delsarte .^Esthetic Physical Culture. Just formed, lessons in class to child- 
ren. Lessons private and in class. 

Dr. Charles W. Decker, Dentist 



Phelan Building Rooms 6, 8, 10. 



Entrance S06 Market street 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 27, 1900. 




Frederick "Frederick Douglass," by Mr. Charles W. 

Douglass. Chesnutt, is the latest contribution to "The 
Beacon Biographies" series, of which Mr. M. 
A. De Wolfe Howe is the editor. Douglass's fame as an 
orator has long been secure, and on the world's stage he 
played a conspicuous part. As the champion of an op- 
pressed race his life will serve for all time as an incentive 
to aspiring souls "who would fight the battles and win the 
love of mankind." Mr. Chesnutt prefaces his brief sketch 
with a chronological chapter full of interest. Prom it the 
reader learns that Frederick Douglass was born in 1817, 
that nineteen years later be made an unsuccessful attempt 
to escape from slavery, and was sent to Baltimore to learn 
the ship-calker's trade, that in 1838 he did escape from 
slavery and went to New York city, where he married 
Miss Anna Murray, and assumed the name of "Douglass." 
In the early forties he was employed as agent of the Mas- 
sachusetts Anti-Slavery Society and lectured extensively 
and published "Frederick Douglass's Narrative." In 
1845-4G he visited Great Britain and Ireland, when he 
was presented with sufficient money to purchase his free- 
dom, and returning to the United States he established a 
newspaper. In 1859 he visited Canada and sailed from 
Quebec for England. Returning to the United States the 
following year he supported Lincoln for the Presidency, 
and lectured and spoke in favor of the war and against 
slavery. He was appointed Secretary of the Santo Do- 
mingo Commission by General Grant, and later on coun- 
cillor of the District of Columbia. He was also elected 
Presidential elector of the State of New York, and chosen 
by the electoral college to take the vote to Washington. 
In 1886-87 he traveled through Great Britain, Prance, 
Italy, Greece, and Egypt, and two years later was ap- 
pointed United States Minister Resident and Consul-Gen- 
eral to the Republic of Hayti. In 1893 he acted as com- 
missioner for Hayti at the World's Columbian Exposition. 
The later years of his life were spent at his beautiful home 
known as Caesar Hill, Anacostia Heights, near Washing- 
ton, where death came to him suddenly in 1895. "If it be 
no small task," says the author, "for a man of the most 
favored antecedents and the most fortunate surroundings 
to rise above mediocrity in a great nation, it is surely a 
more remarkable achievement for a man of the humblest 
origin possible to humanity in any country in any age of 
the world, in the face of obstacles seemingly insurmount- 
able, to win high honors and rewards, to retain for more 
than a generation the respect of good men in many lands, 
and to be deemed worthy of enrollment among his coun- 
try's great men. Such a man was Frederick Douglass, 
and the example of one who thus rose to eminence by sheer 
force of character and talents that neither slavery nor 
caste proscription could crush must ever remain as a shin- 
ing illustration of the essential superiority of manhood to 
environment. Circumstances made Frederick Douglass a 
slave, but they could not prevent him from becoming a 
freeman and a leader among mankind." 

Frederick Douulass : by Charles W. Chesnutt. (The Beacon Biogra- 
phies). Small, Maynard & Co.. PuDlishers, Boston, Price, 75 cents. 

San Isfdro " Wbat D00ts il to dwe " u PO Q the sufferings 
of a breaking heart? Hearts must ache and 
break, just as souls must be born and die, for thus fate 
plans and the world goes on the same." So says Mrs. 
Schuyler Crowninshield in her latest novel, "San Isidro," 
a tale of the Antilles, and it is this very dwelling "upon 
the sufferings of a breaking heart" which makes the tale 
an unpleasant one. It is the ? tory of a blossom whose 
freshness has been tarnished. Plucked and worn and 
tossed down into the rut along the wayside, there must it 
lie forever limp and faded. San Isidro is a plantation on 
an island in the West Indies, where "storms are sudden and 
waters deep," where immorality prevails and planters give 
free rein to their licentious fancies. The writer is evidently 
familiar with the life portrayed, but is less happy in tbi's 
story and in the telling of it than she is in some former 
ones. 

San Isidro: by Mrs. Schuyler Crowninshield. Herbert S, Stone & Co 
Publishers, New York. " 



" The Human Boy," by Eden Phillpots, is a collection of 
amusing stories, concerning the adventures of a number 
of boys at an English school. Every public school man, 
be he young or old will appreciate each story and realize 
how truly the author has depicted school boy life and 
schoolboy slang. "Morrant's Half Sovereign" is a clever 
and amusing tale of a boy who never had had such a sum 
before in his life and grows thin, pondering on the best 
way of spending it. At last having given the problem up, 
he sews it into a secret part of his trousers, known only 
to himself and four other fellows and eventually has it 
stolen from him. "The Artfulness of Steggles" is another 
good one, showing how Steggles in order to cut out his 
youthful friends with the younger daughter of the "Head," 
gives them strong pipes to smoke which have a dire result 
on their young insides at an inopportune moment, when 
the fair charmer is passing on her bicycle. All the stories 
are good and full of fun and the slaog not so incomprehensi- 
ble as in Kipling's Stalky & Co. Harper & Bros., Pub- 
lishers, New York. Price $1.25. 

"The Favor of Princes," by Mark Lee Luther is a 
story of adventure in the reign of Louis the fifteenth, told 
by the hero himself, Henri Marquis de Veaux. Having 
lost nearly all his estates, he comes to Paris to seek his 
fortune and meets with his cousin who is sunning himself 
in the smiles of royalty. He is advised to make a 
manage de convenance, which be does. He falls 
desperately in love with his wife, the daughter of a rich 
banker. The King's eye falling upon her, our hero is sent 
to cool his heels in the Bastille. Thanks to the efforts of 
Madame de Pompadour, he is released in time to tear his 
beloved from the clutches of the king and is eventually 
pardoned by Louis for saving his life, and is permitted to 
return to court. The story, whilst weak in places main- 
tains its interest to the end. It will doubtless fiDd favor 
in the eyes of those who enjoy reading of the intrigues of 
the French court long ago. The Macmillan Co., Publishers, 
New York. Price $1.50. 

" Mexican Vistas, seen from Highways and Byways of 
Travel," by Harriett Wight Sherratt, is an entertaining 
book, giving an interesting account of journeyings and 
observations through many parts of Mexico. The book is 
written in a spirit of great kindness and liberality and is 
full of anecdotes and incidents illustrating the character- 
istics of the people. The author visited their state 
capitals, their public buildings and ancient ruins. Between 
fifty and sixty fine illustrations from photographs tend to 
make the book all the more interesting. Rand McNally 
&Co., Publishers, Chicago. 

"Judge Elbridge," by Opie Read, is a strong story de- 
picting the dread influences of gambling. The young hero 
falls under the baneful influence of a gambler, and finds 
himself for a time powerless to overcome the evil habit. 
He sacrifices honor and self respect, but ultimately suc- 
ceeds in emancipating himself and redeeming the past. 
His struggles are graphically depicted. Rand, McNally 
& Co., Publishers, Chicago. 

"Mistress Penwick," by Dutton Payne, anew author, 
is a tale of love and knightly deeds, of midnight adventure 
and daring escapade. The time is that of the Restora- 
tion, when the court of Charles was involved in intrigue 
and scandal. Among historical personages introduced are 
Buckingham, Monmouth, and John Bunyan. R. F. Fenno 
& Co., Publishers, New York. Price, $1.50. 

The Macmillan Company report that Crawford's "Via 
Crucis" ran through its forty-second thousand in the fifth 
week of its existence. Of "Richard Carvel" the same 
publishing firm report that the two hundred and eighty- 
fifth thousand is now ready. 

The latest additions to Appleton's "Town and Country 
Library" are "The Heiress of the Season," by Sir 
William Magnay. "The Story of Ronald Kestrel," by A. 
J. Dawson and "A Corner of the West," by Edith 
Henrietta Fowler. 

M. E. B. 



January 27. 1900. 



BAN ] NEWS LITTER. 




" n»« the Oricr T" " Wli.l the ilcvll art ihnu | ■ 
" Oi» that wUl pUr the derti. rir, with rou." 



B 



BHOLD twocoll- 
Kee presidents 
Wbo nice for pop- 
ularity. 

They travel and 
They banquet and 
They lecture for 
.Sweet charity. 

The ravished pub- 
Lio likes their talk; 
They cheer the more 
The worse it is, 
Because it ad- 
vertises both 
The rival u- 
Niversilies 

' "P WAS at Tlie Winter's Tale the other night. A cer- 
1 taia homespun, whisker-fringed wight had come the 
witching comedy to see. High-seated in the peanut gal- 
lery he viewed the sorrows of the great Leontes, and 
chewed tobacco, as the hayseed's wont is. He did not 
like the first or second act. He slept a little, seemed 
quite bored, in fact; and not until the third scene of the 
third was any comment from the rustic heard. Then, 
when amidst the noise of tempest shocks, Leontes' child 
was laid upon the rocks, he said: "I don't exactly see why 
they be rampagin' so about a durned rag baby." * * * 
He saw Miss Kidder in a later scene, as fair Perdita, 
dance upon the green. And saw her leading, with her 
chosen swain, the rustic gambols of the shepherd train. 
"Good land o' graciousl" cried the bland spectator, "this 
theatre 's a dandy incubator. In just one act they done 
it. Well, I swow! That dum rag doll 's a right peart 
lady now!" 

IT is said that an applicant for a civil service certificate, 
showing his fitness for the position of gardener in a 
public square, was refused because he could not tell how 
to make wild flowers tame. But this is probably a 
slander. It is not likely that the Commissioners them- 
selves know how to tame wild flowers. Besides, a gar- 
dener in a public square doesn't have anything to do with 
flowers, wild or tame. All he has to do is to water the 
grass one-third of the day, and sit around on the benches 
the other two-thirds. He is merely called a gardener for 
fear some one should designate him a loafer. 

WHEN adults chose to die without the aid of a physi- 
cian it is their own business, but when a child of 3 is 
permitted to die of pneumonia unattended merely because 
a parent believes in "faith cure" it is time that the good 
old barrel of tar and pillow of feathers came into vogue 
again. The parent in this case is Mrs. Lucy Crawley of 
St. Louis, en route to San Diego, and a poultice of the 
above mentioned components should be applied while hot. 
It can't cure the child now, but it may suppress the fond 
mother. 

THE Reverend James C. Maclnnes, the reformed 
minister of Oakland, who has been converted to danc- 
ing, slaps on the back and "lushers" is on his way to Chi- 
cago, preceded by his own 'press notices. The vaudeville 
managers there will attend to it that his back is properly 
slapped and bid for his confession at public auction. These 
parsons are great press agents and the yellow dailies are 
their slaves. But I don't believe that Maclnnes reformed 
at all, no more than did C. Overman Brown. Chicago 
papers please copy. 

MILLIONS of the inhabitants of drought-stricken Iodia 
are threatened with famine. The lack of rain in this 
unhappy land will no doubt betaken by the flannel-mouthed 
as another indication of England's lack of ability to govern 
wisely and well. 

THE Washington hen that laid an egg bearing "Col- 
onel" Bryan's monogram knew what she was ahout. 
She no doubt intended it for Bryan, but laid it in plenty 
of time to ripen before next election day. 



N- 



REALIZING that the only good highbinder is a dead 
highbinder, the respectable Chinese merchants 
in Francisco have come together in an effort 
to protect the next generation from him. They will use 
the best of all weapons— education. The young Chinese 
will be compelled to attend American schools, which will, 
no doubt, be conducted at the expense of the merchants; 
they will be taught the manners, language and morals of 
this country; they will be taught to value human life, and 
to respect the law that will in turn respect them. The 
highbinder knows no law but the bloody one of his own 
toug. He is a cancer in the scheme of civilization. It is 
a pity that we cannot have done with him by some 
quicker process. But slow as is this one proposed by the 
Chinese Merchants' Association, it is inevitably sure. 
These merchants are good men nearly all of them, and the 
chief sufferers from the highbinder wars, and it remains 
to be seen if their remedy is not just as quick to cure as 
any that shall be prescribed by the police. 

IP you will look on page 2 of the Call for January 20th 
you will be repaid for your trouble by seeing a row of 
top heads that read in this wondrous wise: "Captain 
Burnham May Be Insane," "Young Man Killed by a Crazy 
Logger," "Crushed by a Giant Redwood," "HisNose Cut 
Off With a Beer Glass," "Drunken Quarrel Ends in Mur- 
der," and "Struck with aDemijohn." No, gentle reader, 
this bunch of beauties was not culled from the Call's "Home 
Study Circ'e," but from the body of that journal which so 
nobly essays to bring sweetness and light into the circle of 
the home. 

A LADY has just shown up in Akron, Ohio, who says 
that she is Mrs. Lena Leutgert, who was supposed 
to have been chopped into sausage meat by her husband 
some time ago. Adolph Leutgert — poor man ! — is dead 
now, having already paid the penalty of his alleged crime. 
Although no proof of innocence, no matter how convincing, 
can help the unhappy butcher now, it is not, however, too 
late to hang the lady. 

[OW doth the period approach 
When every party gun unlimbers, 
When every party platform feelB 
The saving grace of planked timbers. 
Alfalfa prophets from afar 
A million wild-eyed scenes are cryin' 
And through the land resounds again 
The bray of William Jennings Bryan. 

IN the scrap books of that good old author-actor-man- 
ager, Denman Thompson, are some 1,400 letters of 
congratulation on the uplifting effects of The Old Home- 
stead, all written, with real tears in their eyes, by ministers 
of the gospel: Mr. Thompson, God bless him, won just 
$4,000 on a horse-race the other day at New Orleans, and, 
we will wager, hasn't received a single congratulation 
from the clergy. 

THE Call publishes a list of slang that may be found in 
the Old Testament — obviously in justification of the 
dialect employed in the Call's local columns. The only ob- 
jection we have to the Call's slang is that it is as old as 
that of the Book of Books. 

IN their eagerness to serve the community, applicants for 
positions in the pest house are trying to break into the 
institution, although it now harbors smallpox of the most 
taking variety. Nothing can check patriotism when a 
salary is in sight. 

yNE'S departed from the Frawleys. 

Jealousy's the cause of it. 
' Bid farewell to Mary Hampton, 
She has got a "nine-side bit." 

THERE were six fatalities in the American prize ring 
during the year 1899. What a pity. Only six. The 
one way to stop prize-fighting is to make it dangerous. 

TWO thousand Deweys are going to banquet the Ad- 
miral, we are told. Two thousand Deweysl Bah I 
The Spanish saw lots more than that at Manila Bay. 

THE uses of the telephone are many, but it has re- 
mained for a young Oakland couple to accomplish 
their honeymoon over the hello wire. 

WHY, my masters, why all this talk about a new broom 
sweeping clean in the case of Acting Chief Biggy? 
You mean a new laundryman washes clean. 



O: 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 27, 1900. 




EMte.Bo. 



Sir Percivale stared long and wilde 
And laughed fulle bitterlie. 
' Oh, sweete ruy knight," his ladye cryde, 
"Nowwhatte thingge aileth thee 
That thou shouldst stare so long and wilde 
When there is nought to see?" 

"Aye, there is naught to see," he cryde. 

And eke he tore his haire, 
1 Nought is there to be seene, because 

Forsooth, it is not there. 
Ah, love has made me do this thingge, 

And must I love forswear?" 

' For while I fondly pledged my love 

And pled for thy pittie, 
The naughtie moments have conspired 

To passe me aecretlie, 
And I have lost the midnight carre 

All for the love of thee!" 



John Oliver Hobbs once wrote a book entitled "The Sin- 
ner's Comedy." Some day there will be written a volume 
on "The Saint's Tragedy," and Oakland will be the scene 
of action. Our sister city has well been dubbed the clus- 
ter of schools, churches and homes. While there is no 
gainsaying the fact that the schools cut a great deal of 
ice, and that the homes are not classed with the "also 
ran," both of these so-called necessities are lobsters when 
the churches enter the race. If you want to be saved, 
physically, politically, financially or socially, you must go 
to church in Oakland. And as Oakland enjoys the great- 
est reputation in the State for crooked financial and polit- 
ical transactions and social fakes, I think it is up to every- 
one to take off their hats to the churches. 

* * * 

There is not a church in Oakland that does not take an 
active hand in the craft of graft from start to finish. 
Every minister, be he from the suburbs or from the pulpit 
of St. Paul's (Oakland), feels it is his imperative duty to 
tell his congregation how to vote. But to the Congrega- 
tional Church, the destinies of which are up to the Rev. 
Dr. Brown, must be awarded the political plum. You 
cannot be elected to an office unless you worship at the 
Brown shrine. Mayor Snow, Auditor Breed, and half the 
other public servants, active and retired, are all from 
this bunch. Postmaster Friend also hails from the Con- 
gregational set, and I suppose when occasion requires, 
Dr. Pardee and H. P. Dallon sing the hymns of that creed 
under the watchful and loving eye of Dr. Brown. 

* * * 

But when it comes to sensationalism, anything in the 
bakery, from the dough to the bun, goes to Dr. Dille and 
the First M. E. Church. Dr. Dille "never overlooks a 
trick that will get his name into the newspapers. Just 
before election he always tells how Jesus would vote on 
the matters under consideration, and the next Sunday he 
denounces the divines who do politics from the pulpit. 

* * * 

At the Unitarian Church the intellectual gag is the 
prime fake. The Rev. B. Fay Mills cooks the dope for 
this congregation. But come to think of it, the Unitarian 
Church dubs itself a Society. That sounds icey and more 
intellectual than congregation. As a matter of fact, the 
majority of Unitarian churches are nothing more than 
social clubs annexed to Woman's Alliances and things. 
John P. Irish is the main squeeze of the Unitarian Church 
over the bay. How a man of his caliber stands for the 
obvious bunches of bunco that B. Fay hands out to his 
hearers is a mystery. But then John P. is quite a prune 
himself, and I guess that makes a difference. The women 
at the Unitarian Church take off their hats when the 
pastor speaketh, and lend a theatrical air to the place 
which is accentuated by the mouthings of Mummer Mills. 

* * * 

If you want to shine as a member of the smart set, you 
must go to St. Paul's and become imbued with the preach- 



lets of the Rev. Robert Ritchie, who is of the ultra- 
Ritualistic. There they talk about everything save re- 
ligion, and some of the small talk that goes on while the 
pastor reads the lessons is diverting in the extreme. If 
you want to shine in Oakland you must bask in the shade 

of the churches. 

* * # 

Talking of St. Paul's and the smart set, reminds me of 
a remark I overheard a man-about-town drop on the Oak- 
land boat the other day. A young man employed in an 
Oakland bank passed, and as he went by the man-about- 
town said: "There is the King of the Free Lunch Brigade." 
As the young fellow has some musical talent, and is asked 
to many of the best houses on both sides of the bay, I in- 
quired how he happened to be dubbed the King of the 
Free Lunchers. "Easily enough," replied the man-about- 
town. "You see he trains with a bundle of young fellows 
who have good clothes and some talent. They are desir- 
able at dinner parties where the male members of the 
family are not particularly well groomed. They go wher- 
ever they are asked, and make it a poiDt to be asked out 
to dine every night in the week. It is the only meal they 
eat unless they happen to bump into some one who invites 
them to luncheon. There are five in his gang, and thty 
are all amateur musicians of talent. They have solved the 
problem of living on nothing a year. A few weeks ago I 
saw where one of them became engaged to a girl with 
money. He'll probably marry her and then manage the 
estate she expects to inherit. There is no one among the 
Oakland smart set who does not know the five free lunch 
fiends. To be vulgar, they are well groomed bums." 

* * * 

" You're invited to my party; 
Pray do not say me nay; 
Come dressed as little children 
Prepared to romp and play. 
The time is set for nine o'clock, 
January 31st. at night, 
80 don your coat or party frock 
For a frolic gay and bright." 

Thus runs the rhymes announcing the children's party 
which Mrs. Tucker is giving in honor of the coming of one 
of the Havemeyer girls who has been her guest at the 
Hotel Metropole at Oakland for the past month. This 
certainly appears to be the herald of the paretic dawn which 
the wise men have promised will one day develop Oakland. 
The women are requested to wear short skirts without 
regard to their physical fitness and the men will dress 
themselves in the costumes of sailor boys and soldier lads 
also in swaddling clothes. The women will carry dolls, 
and rattles and things and the men toy guns, drums and 
putty blowers to emphasize their return to childhood's 
realm. There will be a symphony rendered by a dozen of 
the guests on bazoos and a grand and impressive chorus 
beginning with "Green gravel, green gravel how green 
the grass grows," and coming to a full stop with "Button, 
button who's got my button." Mrs. Tucker wiil recite 
"Heavy heavy bangs over thy head" and if the punch is 
strong enough they will play postofBce. It will be a grand 
affair. The McNears are buried in the venture knee deep. 
The bout will be pulled off at the Oolf Club house. It 
is predicted that the "wasers" and "battle axes" will 
be there in full force in hopes of regaining a glimpse of 
their lost youth. 



Call out a squad of cops ! Look out I 

That girl has swooned away; 
Don't start a panic. Pray be calm I 

It's no mad dog, I say 1 

J ust close yonr ears against the noise, 

Stand still and keep your feet: 
It's only "Teddy" Hartman's clothes 

A coming down the street. 

* * * 

Mrs. F. M. Smith, wife of the Borax King, has announced 
that she is about to start a salon. At first her friends 
thought she meant saloon and some of them are mean 
enough to say that she does not know the difference be- 
tween the two. But there are others who say she does. 
So there you are. But come what may, she is going to 
have a series of "Talks" at Arbor Villa and everyone who 



January 37, 1900. 



BAN ] NEWS LETTER. 



is anyone on the other side of the bay will be invr 
make their little speeches. Just what will be 1 
of the first confab is still a mystery. Some of the wage 
say it will be borax. But they are probably jealous, how- 
ever, and want to disconcert the lady and her aspir.i 
From the prospectus and advertisement of the Bohl 
appears that art, literature and the sciences will have a 
whack at being subjects. Whether they will survive the 
shock is a matter of speculation. 

# # * 

L0CI9 James. 

It Is to laugh! 

He cotneth now. 
Who helmeted and stern of brow. 
With studied stride and tragic roar 
Startled the Roman streets of yore, 
He cometh now in wondrous wlsfl 
Outfitted in a jester's guise. 

It is to laugh ! 

For life grows cold 
And tragedy has made him old. 
His ageing figure now he bears 
More gaily than in former years 
And wise old lips have learned to chart" 
Where youth must weep— It is to laugh I 

* * * 

Attorney Redmond was examining jurors, in a case be- 
fore Judge Hunt, the other morning when he picked 
out a hatchet-faced Teuton named Blatzan who looked 
stupid enough to serve on any jury in the State. 

"'Mr. Blatzan," began the lawyer by way of preliminary, 
"do you know anything about this case?" 

" Aboud vat?" enquired the stolid German. 

"About this case," repeated Mr. Redmond a little more 
distinctly. 

" Vas iss dot you say aboudt?" again asked the juror. 

"About this case," cried the attorney warming to his 
subject. 

The juror looked worried. 

" Maybe I dondt hear vat you talkin' aboudt," he said 
apologetically. 

Attorney Redmond stood on his tiptoes and roared the 
question in a voice that shook the chandeliers. The 
Dutchman heard him this time for he answered. 

"You bet I dondt already yet.'' 

"You seem to have some trouble understanding my 
questions," persisted Mr. Redmond standing close to the 
talesman's ear and speaking in tones of thunder. "Are 
you deaf?" 

"Ami vot?" 

"Are you deaf?" screamed the counsel. 

" Deef ?" answered Blatzan in an aggrieved tone. 
"Deef ? veil I guess nit. I hear you all ridt ven you out 
loud speak." 

The juror was excused. 

# # # 

We hear that Joaquin Miller 
Is a-going for to speak 

Just to aid the poor, uneducated Boer; 
That an anti-English feeling 
Is the latest Miller freak, 

And to air his views Joaquin will take the floor. 

Yes, there ought to be much sympathy 
Between Oom Paul and Joaquin ; 

For are they not both nature-breathing souls? 
80 we'll list with toleration to 
The poet's whiskers talkin' 

As they whistle consolation to Oom Paul's. 

* * # 

It occurred in Judge Lawlor's court a few days ago. 
There was a murder trial on and a policeman named Riley 
was on the witness-stand rela ting the details of the 

Drink Mumm's Extra Dry and you are drinking the finest and 
most popular champagne in the market. 109.303 cases of this wine 
were imported in the year 1899— just 72,495 cases more than any other 
brand. The vintage of 1895, a splendid one, is now on sale. 



One application of Smith's Dandruff Pomade stops itching scalp; 
three to six applications removes all dandruff. Try it. Price 50 
cents, at all druggists. Sample free. Address Smith Brothers. 
Fresno, Cal. 



Maison Tortoni, French Rotteseiie. HI O'Fnrrell street, 
rooms; banquet hall. S. Constantini. Proprieto . 



Private dinine 



tragedy. Said Mr. Ferral, who was acting as defendant's 
counsel: 

" How many minutes after the shooting did the man die, 
Mr. l: 

"Two minutes, sir," answered the witness without the 
least hesitation. 

"You seem positive about the time," remarked Mr. 
Ferral with the air of one whohas the upper hand. "Now 
I'm going to test your ability to judge time I will hold 
my watch here for two minutes. When you think the time 
is up, say when." 

The defendant's counsel held the watch on the witness 
and stood examining the hand carefully. The policeman, 
however, did not seem to be worried at all at the tax upon 
his mental apparatus. He sat staring vacantly about the 
room, and at the exact second when the two minutes had 
expired remarked "Now!" and smiled like a tickled 
sphinx. 

Mr. Ferral was staggered at the uncanny accuracy of 
the witness, and General Solomon, who was prosecuting, 
was delighted proportionately at his opponent's discom- 
fiture. He chuckled, in a comfortable German way, dur- 
ing the rest of the session. At the noon recess he called 
Riley to him and, slapping him on the back said: 

" Officer Riley, you vass a vonderl How dit you do it, 
hein?" 

"Do HI" replied Riley pointing to a big redwood clock 
on the opposite wall, "why that was dead easy I" 

Riley will be promoted. 



When our Great Admiral comes West 
We may not rave as Gotham did, 

We may not rear a plaster arch 
With motto and caryatid. 



We may not meet him at the Pier 
And surge to left and right of him 

And howl insanely in our joy, 

Enraptured at the sight of him. 

Another thing we may not do — 

A thing we will not do I hope- 
Is hiss his picture when we see 
It flashed from the kinetoscope. 



A Bicycle, in passing over a Fragment of Glass, remarked jauntily : 

" You look all broke up; have I disturbed you?" 

" My grief does no* arise from the fact that you have disturbed 
me," replied the Fragment, '"It pains me to think how soon you will 
be on the re-tired list." 

Double Value 

in every 

Remington Typewriter 




"^--— ---- .. 

when equipped with the 

NEW BILLING AND 
TABULATING ATTACHMENT 

Because Invoices, Statements, and Tabular 

Work of every kind can be done quite £2 

JJ as easily and quickly as ordinary writing. 

WYCKOFF, SEAMANS & BENEDICT, 211 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Cal' 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 27, 1900. 




A couple of paltry little allotments of 

Schemers Working Scotch capital is about all the showing 

Eastern States. that can be made for the past year in the 

way of British investment in California 
mines. This, too, has been only scraped up by hard 
work upon the part of the promoters, who were compelled 
to face in this quarter a record of some of their prede- 
cessors who have been accredited with cleaning up more on 
commissions at times than could have been realized by the 
sale of brand new machinery erected upon properties which 
proved utterly worthless after the vendors had pocketed 
what was coming to them upon a basis of inflated valua- 
tions. With this field closed, and the British suckers 
milked dry, the smooth-tongued schemer must fain resort to 
pastures new. He has been driven for sustenance at last 
into the home paddock, and for some time forward the 
Eastern tenderfoot will be the victim, his cousin across the 
.\tlantic having been skinned alive. The Eastern papers 
uow teem with seductive tales at so much a line of money 
making chances in the mountains of California. Some of 
these artfully concocted tales do not even deign to give 
the amount of capital stock owned by the company. This 
is left open while investors are invited to come up and deal 
wholesale upon the installment plan, the inducement being 
the promise of large interest, payable from unearned 
dividends from mines upon which in many cases a pick has 
not yet been struck. If the State of California when dis- 
tributing money for the benefit of mining would divert a 
little of it into some channel which would purify the indus- 
try of parasitic frauds and thieves more good would obtain 
to the commonwealth generally than accrues from the 
system in vogue at present. There is ample room for re- 
form and innovation in this respect, and doubtless we will 
get there in time with the development of the higher 
stages of civilization now progressing by the slow but 
steady process of evolution. Bureaucracy with its con- 
comitant evils is to blame here as elsewhere for back- 
ward conditions, and the reformer has a hopeless as well 
as thankless task so long as this power is in the ascend- 
ancy and machine made politics are permitted to place 
individual interests higher than the public weal. In the 
mean time the mining charlatan should be avoided by in- 
vestors who do not wish to be robbed. No one with 
honest intentions who knows anything about mining will 
promise dividends from an undeveloped property, nor 
guarantee interest payments from the unearned profits 
upon an investment of the kind. This is a pretty safe 
guide in summing up propositions of this kind. The prop- 
erty taken up is likely to turn out as worthless in the long 
run as the promoter of this class, who is not likely to care 
much what he takes up, so long as it offers an excuse to 
carry out successfully the rascally ends in view. It takes 
time and a large expenditure of money as a rule to make 
a dividend paying mine, and where one is met with there 
are hundreds which practical men would abandon after 
a fair test of the ground. 

An increased movement in the market for 
The Comstock Comstock shares is the feature of the 
Mining Market, week. This shows that investors who 
have been dodging assessments for the 
past six months have concluded that it is about time to 
get on board, rather than take any chances of carrying 
their shrewd calculations too far, and losing thereby any 
ground they may have apparently gained in the specula- 
tive game. The heavy expenditures of the Comstock com- 
panies are nearing an end, and with the closing payments 
about to be made upon the cheap power plant their portion 
of the contract is concluded, and it remains for the con- 
struction company to do the rest. The last payment on 
this important change in the system of mining operation 
will be made next month, making $75,000 in all, leaving a 
balance of $25,000, which will not become due until the 
electric plant on the Comstock is in full and successful 
operation. In addition to this the total of $25,000 has 
just been made up on the drainage plant at the C. & C 
shaft by the payment of the fifth installment of $5,000 to 
the Risdon Iron Works, leaving the balance of $5,000 on 



the $30,000 open until the water in the shaft has been 
dropped to a depth of 2224 feet, reckoning from the sur- 
face, where it must be held, so that the liabilities upon the 
part of the Comstock Companies have been well and faith- 
fully cleaned up in all directions. The management of the 
Comstock Pumping Association can be congratulated upon 
this, as they have been working all along against heavy 
odds and in face of a most determined opposition, much of 
which was encountered in quarters from which it would 
only have been natural to expect material aid and support. 
That they have succeeded in carrying out the proposed in- 
novations entitles them to credit, and it will be hoped 
that the results will eventually be such as to repay them 
for all the troubles and annoyances of the past. The min- 
ing situation on the lode is also brightening up consider 
ably. The prospects in Con. -Cal.- Virginia are excellent 
for another important development of ore. It may take a 
little time before the ground is opened up sufficiently to 
make a showing, but the indications now on the 1800-level 
are such as to warrant the belief that before the end of 
the current year dividends will again be in order. Potosi 
is another stock from which much is expected by those who 
follow closely the trend of work in the mines. There is 
every reason to hope that the Geneva will prove a valu- 
able acquisition to this company, while demonstrating 
favorably on the proposition so stoutly maintained in the 
past by supporters of the west-ledge theory. Viewed 
from every standpoint, conditions on the Comstock show 
changes for the better, which must lead in due course to 
activity in the market and higher prices for the shares. 

Legitimate development work in the new oil 
The Oil fields of California is progressing satisfactorily 
Industry, in every respect, and a good quiet demand is 
reported on all sides for shares in companies 
which are carrying out their promises made to share- 
holders. Those which are not doing so lose public confi- 
dence by the delay, and every period which passes with- 
out the fulfillment of their announced intentions only 
places them in a worse light. Judging from the way some 
individuals are gobbling up land and making no effort to 
develop it, their sole aim is to corner the earth. Unable 
financially to develop a single tract, they are hoggish 
enough to act as a bar to people who have the means and 
ability to carry on work to a successful issue. Time alone 
is required to separate the wheat from the chaff in this 
new industry, and every day enlightens investors upon 
the merits of a company. New strikes of oil are being 
made in the different fields now open, affording every as- 
surance to adjoining companies in active operation of ulti- 
mate success. So far everything tends to encourage in- 
vestment in this new industry, and dividends by producing 
companies are now coming along with unfailing regularity. 
Shares of this class will eventually be in demand, and the 
investor who realizes this and takes advantage of the op- 
portunity to buy them upon favorable indications, as the 
work of development proceeds upon well located ground, 
will be the one to make money. Waiting until well after 
well is flowing means high-priced shares, and conse- 
quently lower returns upon the capital invested. 

The latest information from the 
The Peerless Company's Peerless Oil Company is to the 
Oil Indications. effect that well No. 2 is down 700 

feet and has passed through 210 
feet of oil sand, 180 feet of which is very rich in oil. 
Prom the depth of 611 feet to 700 feet the well passed 
through a continuous strata of very prolific oil sand, and 
the bottom of the stratum has not been reached. These 
facts are considered very significant by the manage- 
ment as indicating the great value of the property. It is 
considered likely that this well will be carried down fully 
800 feet before sinking is stopped. 

STATISTICS from a recognized authority show that the 
shipments of nitrate of soda in 1899 aggregated 
1,360,000 tons, or 95,000 tons more than in 1898, while the 
world's consumption only rose 40,000, from 1,195,000 to 
1,335,000 tons. The visible stock has consequently been 
enlarged. 

Ladies do not have to wear switches to cover up their defects if 
they use Smith's Dandruff Pomade in time, it cures dandruff, itch- 
ing scalp, stops falling hair and makes hair grow. Price 50c at all 
druggists. 



January 37, 1900. 



san 11. w 3 LETTER. 



»3 



FOLLOWING are the transactions on the Stock and 
Bond Exchange for the week beginning January 19 It 
and ending January 26th : 



Oonlrm *'•—• . 
Lo* Al 

- 

SUrk. - 
Nor liy 



Mist KM ANKOI'S BO.NIX 




. Muoeiu 



WATH. -h.ir.- 

Oontm Oo»U W«ter._ 3» 
Spring- Val ley Wm I I 

Gas asd BuBfna 
Equitable ri. 

Minimi Electric 1"'. 

Oakland G». 
PactllcCiaa Iniu'v'iil. ISO 

Oaa and Electric MS 

SFlta. Jiv. 

Street Railroads. 

Market Street 1311 

Powders. 

Giant. 60 

Vleoril TOO 






,7 . 
5 






■ 
■ 

s r <>f \i 
8 V \v u 
B v W « 

- VU \\ Sd lie I 

U P Oo I80C 

Milan A 9 I 

HooRkaa 

i Ruiohlnson 210 

ikawell in 

Ol...liu:i '."A'. 

Paauhau S PICo i 



8 





ir«t 






MIS' KLI.ASEOrs. 



n 



fUaaka I'nckers 8S 

Oceanic SS Co 73S 

Oal'f 9afe Deposit 10 

(H 1 * Miilu.il Savings GO 

2", 



ll'r, 

'.17 
15 



in'- 

VI 

15 



The trnnsncllutiH for the week amount to 7.72."> shares and sr.,000 bonds ns 
neninst S.0O8 shares and 15S.O00 bonds of the previous week. 

Dunne the week both the Oceanic S. S. Oo. nncl Giant Powder Co. have 

held their annual meetings, eneh company makins » aplendid showing for 

it* stoekhnldcrs. Mr. Itciuis was elected president o{ the Giant Powder Com- 
pany, and the new Board of Directors of this company have declared a divi- 
dend oi ... etui- per share, which the company will no doubt keep up here- 
after. Sugar stock- have shown very little action during the week, and the 
trading in bonds has been much lighter than during the two previous weeks. 



NEVER has there been such a year for calendars. 
Among the many attractive advertising designs of 
this useful character is the one issued by Walter Baker & 
Co., the chocolate manufacturers. It is handsomely 
colored and the numbers are printed in bold, clear type. 

If there is anything in this world that a man ought to be particular 
about it is the whiskey he drinks. Bad whiskey is the root of most 
crime. Drink the J. F. Cutter and Argonaut brands and be sure 
that you are right. All whiskey is good, but be sure that you are 
getting whiskey. Tbe J. F. Cutter and Argonaut brands are the real 
thing. E. Martin & Co., 411 Market street, sole agents. 



OBITUARY. 

IN the death of Julius Bandmann, who died Monday even- 
ing at his residence in Van Ness avenue, San Francisco 
loses a well-known and honored citizen. Mr. Bandmann 
was a native of Hamburg. He came to California in '49, 
and was always Identified with Hit' best interests of the 
city. He was prominent in mercantile and manufacturing 
cinles up to a few years ago, when he retired from active 
business. He leaves a widow and a son, Charles J. Band- 
mann. 
_ <. ... Another death of the week was 

Francs S. Wensmger. lhat Qf Francis g Wetsmge r, who 

passed away on Wednesday in his apartments at the Occi- 
dental Hotel. Mr. Wensinger had been identified with 
several of the most important enterprises in California. 
For a long time be was one of the principal stockholders 
in the Pacific Coast Steamship Company, and he was also 
one of the founders of the First National Bank. A man of 
sterling integrity, possessed of many friends, he died at 
the age of seventy-five, leaving a widow, and a fortune 
estimated at a million. 
„ , George Jennings, a prominent young 

George Jennings. Native g on aQd 01ympic Clubman, died 

on Monday. He was the last surviving partner of the 
wholesale grocery house of Hooper & Jennings, and a 
brother of Supervisor Jennings. He leaves a widow and 
two young children. 

Mrs. Mary Augusta Burdell, wife of Dr. 

Galen Burdell of Marin County, died on Wed- 
nesday in this city. Her husband and a son and daughter, 
James M. and Mabel, survive her. His estate is valued at 
a million. 

Do you know that Smith's Dandruff Pomade has cured thousands 
of cases of dandruff, itching scalp, eczema and falling hair when all 
other remedies have failed? Price 50c at all druggists. Sample Free. 
Address Smith Bros., Fresno, Cal. 



Mrs. Burdell. 



Fire Sanitary Plumbing at J. Ahlbach's, 136 Fourth street. 



PARKER'S COUGH CURE. 
A Sovereign Remedy. One dose will stop a congh. it never fails. 
Try it. Price, 25 cents. Oeoroe Dahlbender & Co., 214 Kearny 
street. For sale bv all druggists. 



Another Oil Well 



and the 



Has been struck on the GIANT OIL COMPANY'S property at McKittrick. 
After six months' work at McKittrick, 

The California Standard Oil Co. 
The Giant Oil Company 

are producing oil from their first well at the rate of 150 to 200 carrels per day, 
and shipping a Carload per day to their consumers. 1300 acres are con- 
trolled by these companies, and 3 Standard Rigs are in operation night and 
day drilling other wells. Land U. S. Patent. 

Purchase stock in a PRODUCING COMPANY. Subscriptions for the first 
issue are now being received at $1 per share. 

A DIVIDEND of 7 per cent, on this figure could be paid to-day were it not 
for the fact that the income from the sale of oil is being used for further develop- 
ment. What will this stock be worth when 20 such wells are producing ? 

OFFICbS OF THE COMPANIES: 

ROOM 16, 2d FLOOR MILLS BUILDING. 
460 and 462 EIGHTH STREET, Oakland. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 27, 1900. 



INSURANCE. 



THE tables of the life insurance business of California 
for the year 1899 are interesting both to the laymen 
and the profession. 

The Pacific Mutual Life took in, in premiums, $60,292 in 
new business, and on renewals, $266,043, and closed the 
year with 3,870 policies in force, and paid losses and en- 
dowments of $150,194. This is the ordinary life, exclusive 
of the industrial and accident business. In the industrial 
business the number of policies written was 43,659, the 
amount $8,381,629, and the first week's premiums 
amounted to $5,712, while the renewal premiums for the 
year were $247,180. In this department the Pacific 
Mutual has 44,203 policies in force, and paid for losses for 
the same department almost $50,000. 

The largest amount of losses and endowments paid by 
any company in this State during the year was paid by 
the Mutual Life of New York, A. B. Forbes & Son, mana- 
gers, $567,521; the same company also wrote the largest 
number of policies, 1,953, and its premium income there- 
from was $223,068; and the premium income from policies 
renewed, which were in number 6,626, was $877,120. 

The New York Life, Chas. A. McLane, manager, paid 
out in California $391,901, it wrote 1,642 new policies, the 
premiums upon which were $152,493, and it closed the 
year with policies in force to the number of 7,554, the 
premium upon which was $604,737. 

The Equitable, A. M. Shields, manager, paid out in Cali- 
fornia $324,157; it wrote 1,280 policies, the premiums on 
same were $142,610; it had 6.504 policies in force at the 
close of business, the premiums upon which were $555,710. 

The Phoenix Mutual, Osborn & Hicks, managers, wrote 
151 new policies in California, from which they derived 
a premium of $12,489, renewed 172 policies, and derived 
therefrom for premiums $11,797, and paid out for losses 
in California $19,327. 

The Union Mutual, W. C. Leavitt, manager, wrote 533 
new policies, premiums upon which were $32,212, renewed 
1,287 policies, premiums upon which were $73,813. It had 
almost 2,000 policies in force at the end of the year, and 
paid $62,605 for endowments and losses. 

The Northwestern Mutual, Clarence M. Smith, manager, 
wrote 669 new policies, collected in premiums therefor 
$69,775, renewed 3,477 policies and collected $255,687 in 
premiums, and paid for losses and endowments $129,665. 

The New England Mutual, Henry K. Field, manager, 
wrote 629 new policies with premiums of $40,418, renewed 
2,271 policies with premiums of $204,911, and paid for 
losses and endowments $138,165. 

The Fidelity Mutual of Philadelphia, Geo. A. Rathbun, 
manager, wrote 1024 new policies, with a premium income 
of $26,540. It renewed 712 policies, with a premium in- 
come therefrom of $47,268. It had 1,642 policies in force 
in California at the end of the year, and paid during the 
year to California policyholders and beneficiaries $18,000. 

The Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York col- 
lected the largest amount of premiums in this State, and 
paid the largest amount to its policy holders and bene- 
ficiaries during last year. 

The company that had the smallest business was the 
Security Life and Trust Company, Milton J. Green, man- 
ager, who by mistake wrote three policies, for which the 
company received $195, and did not have to pay any 
losses. 

The gross number of new policies written in the State 
by all companies was 54,549; the amount covered by these 
policies is $32,915,340; the premiums on the same were 
$1,017,344. The number of policies renewed by all com- 
panies in the State were 56,517; the amouot covered, 
$107,366,326. The total premiums paid were $4,101,409, 
and the total amount of policies in legal reserve com- 
panies in force at the close of business, December 31st, in 
the State of California was 96,346; the amount insured 
$145,899,309, and the total amount paid by all the com- 
panies for losses and endowments was $2,472,694. 

Clarence M. Smith, manager of the Northwestern 
Mutual, has taken a trip to Los Angeles on business and 
pleasure. 

Caesar Bertheau, Pacific Coast manager of the Aachen 
and Munich, is on a business trip to the North. 



E. W. Carpenter, the only man who ever retired from 
a fire insurance general agency with a fortune, has been 
heard of. He is in Florida, where he is entertaining him- 
self and friends in his usual happy style. 

The Union Central Life Insurance Company failed to file 
its preliminary statement with the Insurance Commis- 
sioner prior to the fifteenth. The penalty for such failure 
is $100 for the first month and $200 for each succeeding 
month. The Union Mutual is still without a general 
agent, and in spite of President Patterson's statement to 
the contrary, it looks as if the company would abandon 
this field. 

Col. Hawes of the New York Life will return from the 
Islands as soon as the quarantine permits. His vacation 
has benefited his health and he is himself again. 

The Bankers' Life Association of Des Moines, Iowa, of 
which E. F. Delger of San Francisco is State Agent, only 
wrote $1,649 in new premiums during 1899. Enough said. 

What has become of the California Mutual Benefit 
Society, the International Indemnity Company, the Mu- 
tual Indemnity Company, and the Decimal Mutual Life 
Insurance Company? Have they folded their tents, like 
the Arabs, and silently stolen away? Echo answers in 
dying tones, "Yea — yea." 

A conundrum: If Wolfsohn did not die in Los Angeles, 
who was buried in his name, and who pays the expenses 
of finding out? 

''No, no; we do not supply clubs and libraries with 
copies of this journal gratuitously. That sort of enter- 
prise is left to contemporaries which can in no other way 
hope to have any circulation." Nobody asked you, un- 
kind sir, she said. 

The News Letter does not object to any of the other in- 
surance papers using the items it publishes, but in a 
spirit of fair play it asks that due credit be given for the 
news stolen. 

The combined efforts of all the county mutual fire insur- 
ance companies in the State for the entire year of 1899 
produced, amount at risk, less than $450,000; premiums, 
$1,500; and losses, $742. 

The regular monthly recrimination meeting of the San 
Francisco Life Underwriters' Association happened on 
Friday last. The regular dinner followed at the Califor- 
nia Hotel and for thirty days peace reigns — without rebate. 

Onorous taxation by States on life insurance companies 
is another argument in favor of Federal supervision, as 
evidenced by the rumor that the Travelers' of Hartford 
is about to remove to New York, the Northwestern Mu- 
tual from Milwaukee to Chicago, and the Bankers' Life of 
Des Moines to Indianapolis. What is the matter with the 
companies in question coming to California? The general 
agent of the Connecticut Fire Insurance Company will, on 
application, tell enquirers how liberal California's Insur- 
ance Commissioner can be when he wants to. 

Chas. A. McLane, agency director of the New York Life 
Insurance Co. for California, is back after a trip to the 
East, and says he prefers California weather and California 
business to Eastern weather and Eastern business. 

The dinner which the underwriters gave to D. J. Staples, 
ex-president of the Firemans Fund, was a very happy 
affair, at which there were between fifty and sixty guests. 
Felicitous remarks were made by C. D. Haven, Wm. Greer 
Harrison, C. F. Mullins, George F. Dornin, George C. 
Boardman, and others, and as a token of esteem and 
memento of the occasion, Mr. George F. Grant, in his 
usual happy style, presented Mr. Staples, on behalf of him- 
self and friends, with a very handsomely chased and en- 
graved solid silver loving cup. It need not be added that 
the lips of the cup were ruthlessly ravished of their fresh- 
ness in the vigorous manner so common to insurance men. 

Before the New York charter went into force, Carl Jus- 
sen was the secretary of the Fire Department of New 
York and at the same time was a veteran. He was dis- 
charged January 1, 1898, to make room for a more favored 
politician. He brought suit in the Supreme Court of that 
State, and claimed that being a veteran he could not 
be removed except for cause, and that if removed from his 
position prior to the new charter coming into existence, 
he was entitled to a similar position and salary. He has 
secured judgment against J. J. Scannell, Fire Commis- 
sioner of New York City, in the sum of $9,666.66, being 
the arrears of salary due him since his dismissal. 



January ay, 1900. 



SAN 1 - 1.1 1TI1. 



is 



The Fire Underwriters' Inspection Bureau has Issued 
its annual repor' .i> comprebcntWe as it cbh be 

made. It inspc - and made 3,435 elec- 

s, and it was mainiv through the efforts 
of the Bureau that the new charter provided for a depart- 
ment of electricity, which will maintain a force of in- 
spectors who will Mipervise all electrical work while in 
course of installation and construction. The percentage 
of tires from preventable causes was 6 4 percent., again a 
reduction from the low percentage of former years. The 1 
total changes secured during the year were 11,876, hy 
this means reducing the fire hazaid to the extent of the j 
improvements secured. It removed over 2000 wo den ash 
barrels, protected 11S5 open flue holes, made 1802 electri- I 
cal changes, and instructed a lot of property owners on 
the dangers to their property by their own carelessness . 
and showed them the remedy. Inspection, selection and | 
protection is equally beneficial to insurer and insured. 

Taking the figures of the twenty-fifth annual report of 
the Underwriters Fire Patrol, the losses paid on buildings 
not insured during last year were $39,925.9"; the losses 
on contents uninsured, $55,151.29; the total. $95,077 26. 
While the losses on buildings that were insured were $243,- 
546 59, and the losses paid were $203,620.67, on insured 
contents the losses were $496,510.90, and the losses paid 
$441,359.61. There were three fires that involved a loss 
of over $30,000 each, as follows: Miller, Sloss & Scott, 
$299,218: Hapiist Church, $48,973.26; Bush-street Thea- 
tre, $37,909.81; four that involved a loss 1 f $20,000 to $30,- 
000, and five that ran from $10,000 to $20,000. Among 
the principal causes of fire were: Burning chimney, 33; 
children with matches, 13; defective chimneys, 12; sparks 
from chimney, 37; upsetting coal oil lamp, 13; while the 
grand total of cigar, pipe and cigarette smoking as the 
cause of fires amounts to 34; and patriotism in the shape 
of fireworks was responsible for 27 alarms. 

There is no question about the News Letter publishing 
the insurance news of the street fifty-two times a year, 
and that its items are re-written and re-published by some, 
or at least one, of the so-called insurance reviews, is well- 
known to its readers. 

Thomas S. Chard, who resigned his position as general 
agent of the Firemans Fund, has been favored by not hav- 
ing his resignation accepted, and will continue in the usual 
discharge of his duties until April. 

If any fire underwriter is in need of a coat of arms, Col. 
Wm. Macdonald, manager of the London and Lancashire 
and — and — and — etc.— etc. — can supply him. 



THE progress of the printer's art is fittingly marked 
in this closing year by the artistic calendar just re- 
ceived from N. W. Ayer & Son, newspaper and magazine 
advertising agents, Philadelphia. There are helpful sug- 
gestions accompanying each month's figures, and there is 
a rich ensemble of color and design. This edition will not 
last long; while it does, those who send 25 cents to the 
publishers will receive a copy postpaid. 

CHICAGO IN THREE DAYS 

Via Chicago, Union Pacific and Northwestern Line every day in the 
year from San Francisco at 8:30 a. m. BuSet, smoking, library cars, 
with barber. Double drawing-room sleeping cars. Dining cars- 
meals a la carte. Breakfast in Diner on leaving Oakland Pier. 
Daily through tourist car to Chicago without change at 6:30 p. m. 
R. E. Ritchie, General agent Pacific Coast, 2 New Montgomery 
treet, (Palace Hotel) San Francisco. 

for your 



.Mothers, be sure and use " Mrs. Winslow's Soothing Syrup 
children while teething. __^ 



tfiSfelU SAUSOMt SI 





LONDON ASSURANCE. 



OCEAN MARINE. 



Capital SubBorlbed $4,482,760 

Capital Paid Dp 2,241,376 

Assets 1 9,1 95,146 

Capital Subscribed $5,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 600,000 

Assets 2,502,050 



INSURANCE 



FIRE. MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE 



FIREMANS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000 Assets, $3,500,000 
PALATINE 

DfSVRANOE COMPANY (limited) OF MANCHESTER ENGLAND 

SOLID SECURITY OVER $9,000,000 RESOURCES 

CHA9. A. LATON. Manager. 439 California street. & F. 
FIRE INSURANCE 



Pounded A. D. 1702 

Oompany of / lorth A 



nsurance Company 



menca 



OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital £1.000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders 15022,01a 

JAMES D. BAJLEY. General Agent. 412 California street, S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter, A. D. 1720 

Capital Paid Up, 83,446.100 • Assets, (24,034,110.35 

Surplus to Policy Holders. (9.612,455.% 

FRANK W. DICKSON, Manager 

501-503 Montgomery street, corner Sacramento 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

New Zealand Insurance Company 

op New Zealand 
Capital. $6,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office iu company's building, 312 California street 

W. P. THOMAS, Manager 
Hooker & Lent, City Agents, 14 Post street 

Phoenix Assurance Co., of London 

Established 1782 

Providence-Washington Insurance Company 

Incorporated 1799 



BUTLER & HALDAN. General Agents 



413 California street, S. F. 



Connecticut Fire Insurance Co 

OF HARTFORD 

Caah Capital $1,000,000.00 

Cosh Assets 3,869,451.75 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,068,839.71 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH. Manager 
COLIN M. BOYD, San Francisco agent, 411 California street. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co 

(Limited) OF LIVERPOOL 

Capital 86,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents 316 California street . S. F . 

The Thuringia Insurance Company 

of ERFURT, GERMANY 

Capital, $2,250,000 Assets. $10,984,248 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome street. S. F. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of Hamburg, Germany 
N. SOHLESLNGER, City Agent 304 Montgomery street San Francisco 

Western Mutual Investment Co. ™- M <"» ^ 

$2 Per Month 
415-416 Safe Deposit Building, Montgomery and California streets, San 
Francisco. Agents Wanted. 



16 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



January 27, 1900. 



THE DIARY OF A THIEF. 



April 8.— I have stolen a purse and have just counted 
the contents. There are one hundred and seventeen thou- 
sand and twenty-eight francs. 

Besides this there are nine bank-notes of one thousand 
francs each and two bills of one hundred francs each. 

I am rich I 

But I do not know what to do — I am so nervous. 

This evening, in counting the money, I have been in the 
most horrible agony. 

Once, when I had the money spread out before me on 
the table, I distinctly beard a knock at the door. 

Three knocks, which affected me as three blows would 
have done. 

Quickly I extinguished the candle and remained immov- 
able, not daring to breathe, during which time the blood 
coursed madly through my brain. 

I thought I heard pome one breathing outside the door. 

A long while after, I slowly arose, taking infinite pre- 
caution not to make a noise in moving my chair. 

I dropped my pen. 

The noise petrified me. 

Again I remained bent double, not daring to stand up- 
right. 

At last, after suffering what my pen cannot attempt 
to portray, I stealthily, with a cat-like movement, drew 
back the bolt of the door. 

Softly, softly I opened it, and peered out, like a hunted 
animal. 

Nobody there ! 

I relighted my candle and commenced counting again, 
always interrupted by false alarms. 

I have taken precautions; what have I to fear? 

A month ago I went to see an uncle who lives on the 
outskirts of Paris. 

For two years I have been without work, only having 
had occasional plays to copy at the theatre, when they 
had no one else to do it. 

My uncle gave me a five-franc piece and kept me over- 
night. 

From the bedroom, just as I was going to bed, I saw a 
light shining in an opposite window. 

A man was counting bank-notes, bonds, and stocks, the 
very ones I have here now. His work ended I saw him 
place them in a pocket-book and disappear with the lamp. 

A moment afterwards I descried a light in the stable. 

Without realizing why I was doing it, 1 arranged to 
remain another night at my uncle's. 

The tiger in my destiny was showing me its velvet claw, 
the hideous sweetness of the monster. 

As soon as my uncle was asleep that night I climbed 
over the hedge which separated his garden from bis neigh- 
bor's and crouched near the stable door. 

I waited what seemed to me an eternity. The scene of 
the evening before was repeated. I placed my eye to the 
crack in the door; I saw the man enter with his pocket- 
book and his lamp, place the latter upon a plank, kneel 
down and lift, with a great egort, a large stone; then he 
slipped the pocket-book in a hole expressly made, placed 
the stone over it tenderly, and disappeared. 

I went back to my bed. 

In the morning I found that it would be very easy to un- 
screw the lock, and in leaving, without knowing what I 
was doing, I took one of the two keys belonging to my 
uncle's gate. 

My evil genius was at work, and destiny was about to 
offer me a glass of Folly to drink. 

I knew that the neighbor was an old miser, and that 
he lived alone, quite alone. 

I had nearly forgotten this when yesterday — yes, it was 
yesterday — I was hungry. I had nothing more to bring 
to the "Mont-de-Piete." I was in sad misery. 

I left home as the shades of eight were falling; I used 
my uncle's key to unlock the gate, and, unscrewing the 
lock from the stable door I lifted the stone and found the 
bidden treasure. 

Great Heaven ! was there no one to stay my hand? 

I took the pocket-book, screwed the lock on again, shut 
the gate, and returned home. 



A golden phantom throws threatening phantoms over 
my humble life. Oh! to be anywhere — anywhere out of 
this trouble. 

But I shall be brave. 

April 9. — I slept well — had no dreadful visions. 

This morning on awakening it was a long time before I 
could convince myself that it was true. Yes; it is true, 
and now the question is to avoid being caught. 

Oh I away with remorse. I'll get out of this scrape. 

I was huDgry. I took the two bank-notes, and after 
having hidden the pocket book in the bottom of my trunk, 
I double-locked my door and went out. 

While going downstairs I said to myself: "I shall buy 
a safe." 

Then I laughed outright; as if a rich man could continue 
to live in this humble abode ! On the way to the coffee- 
house I reflected upon the quarter I should select for my 
new home. My hand upon the door-knob, I was on the 
point of entering, when my guilty conscience troubled me 
by suggesting that the proprietor of the cafe would ask 
me for the month's rent, and that if I paid I should awaken 
suspicion. I passed on. 

I entered a large restaurant and had a good repast. I 
felt that I should like to help the poor, but I dared not. 

I paid with one of the hundred-franc bank-notes; the 
waiter was a long time in returning me my change, and I 
was filled with uneasiness. 

In my imagination I saw a coliceman; my fear became 
frenzy; I took my hat and walked out, resolved to lose the 
balance of the money rather than be caught. 

Behind me I heard : 

"Sir! Sir!" 

I had already opened the door. Should I run or turn 
back? 

I hesitated. Then I committed an act of admirable 
courage — I turned half-round. 

" Your change, sir I" 

I insolently scolded the waiter for keeping me waiting so 
long. 

April 25. — I have not committed a single mistake for a 
fortnight. 

Out of two hundred francs there remain but three. 

I should have bought a new suit before spending the 
small notes; my clothes are a thing of the past, and the 
smallest money I possess is one thousand francs! 

I cannot possibly change it, wearing this sorry garb. 

It would be just as logical to give myself up. Perhaps 
I shall have an idea by to morrow. 

April 26. — I cannot devise any means. 

The trouble is I am poor, in this beautiful, pitiless, devil- 
ish Paris, with one hundred and twenty-six thousand francs 
in my pocket. I have only thirteen centimes left. 

Later, the same day. — I have just returned from the 
National Library. This morning I went out with my bank- 
notes, hoping that an inspiration would come to me. 

All at once an idea passed through my head. I have 
one hundred and twenty-two thousand francs; I repeat this 
unceasingly. But am I sure of this? Have the bonds and 
stocks any value? or has the old miser taken steps to 
prevent their being negotiated? 

I asked in the reading room for a book containing infor- 
mation about stocks and bonds. An idiot of an employee 
laughed outright. 

I said so myself: 

"You may laugh, but one is often deceived by appear- 
ances." 

I found what I sought. 

There is a journal which publishes a list of stolen or lost 
securities. It is sold near the Exchange. 

I bought it for ten centimes. Then I bought three cen- 
times' worth of bread. 

What shall I do for bread to-morrow? I have only nine 
thousand francs in bank-notes and one hundred and seven- 
teen thousand in bonds and stocks. 

The old man has not made his loss known. 

My head aches. I am going to bed. 

April 27.— -I am hungry. 

I must really get change today. 

Midnight. — I returned home, exhausted. 

I have not succeeded. 

I asked myself this question: 



January 17, 1900. 



S \ N 1 



«7 



■ ier what circumstances can a poor man chm 
bill of one thousand f ram- 
"In only one case, when the bill does not belong to him." 
Upon reflection I found another case. 
I have resolved to present myself at the railw.i 
tion and take a ticket for a far-off country— Constanti- 
nople, Moscow, no matter where. 

The man who sells the tickets will only see my hands, 
which I shall carefully wash. 

I shall walk out of the waiting-room, throw away the 
ticket, buj at first cheap clothes, then better ones, and 
still netter ones, so that at the end I shall have the ap- 
pearance of a man worth a thousand francs without hav- 
ing drawn the attention of my tailors by too sudden a 
transformation. 

I am very much delighted with and proud of my idea. 

But at what station does one take a ticket for Moscow? 

I went to the nearest railway station. 

Oh I horror. At every p'.ace where tickets were being 
sold an employee examined the travelers. Policemen 
walked hither and thither. 

I saw my mistake. 

I looked like a murderer trying to reach the frontier. 

I must abandon this plan. 

Half-an-hour afterwards hope smiled on me again. 

A poor man can only have a bill of one thousand francs 
to change when this bill is not his own. 

How can he have a bill of one thousand francs? 

Easily enough I He may be employed. 

Exactly. The same thing had happened to me once be- 
fore. 

Then I was accountant in a paper mill, and the proprie- 
tor had sent me for change to a neighboring bank. 
* * * * 

I returned home, took some ebalk and began whitening 
the collar and cuffs of my shirt. 

I took my pen and went out without a hat. 

Before reaching the place I placed the pen behind my 
ear, and resolutely entered the banking-house. 

I looked like an employee with my bare head and pen. 

I opened the bill and presented it to a boy in livery. 

"Change for a thousand francs, if you please." 

Behind the cashier's desk I saw gold, silver, and bills. 

I felt now that my efforts were to be crowned with suc- 
cess. 

The cashier had already commenced to count out the 
golden coins. 

Suddenly he stopped. 

" For what house ? " said he. 

"What?" 

"What house do you come from?" 

"Brevel & Co." 

"I don't know it." 

"Rue Le Peletier.'' 

"We only give gold in exchange for notes to our clients." 

I took my note and went out without saying a word. 

April 28, 5 p. m. — I can't sleep; I am hungry. 

This fortune and nothing are synonymous. 

I had rather die than live on like this. 

Apkil 30.— Saved I I am saved I 

I am happy, I am free 1 

I have nothing. 

Last night, exhausted, driven to madness, I arose, took 
the pocketbook and went to throw it and myself into the 
Seine. 

Some one — I don't remember who — has said: 

"No circumstance, no matter how terrible it be, au- 
thorizes one of Heaven's creatures to take his life." 

But when one's brain is on fire and the nerves strung to 
bursting a plunge in the cold Seine would end it all. 

"The undiscovered country" cannot reserve tortures 
for me worse than those I have suffered. 

It is done. But I am still on earth. 

I thought to drown myself in the river; a policeman 
dragged me out. 

Upon recovering consciousness I asked for the pocket- 
book. 

I heard a voice saying: 

" I told you I saw a pocket-book under his arm. He 
has lost it in the water. What was in it?" 

I appeared not to understand, in order to gain time to 
reply: 



nothing: only papers of no val 
'■ntleman, touched with pity at my misery, has given 
me a start in life. 



As for the miser, I learned Ions 
grief upon discovering his loss.— E 



after that he died of 
Brieux in Illustrated 



A 1 .irkrm. education in art may be bad by visiting the art rooms 
of William Morria, 3i8 Batter atrrnt. On lale and , ihibitlon are to 
be found paintings in nils, water color", pastels, engravings, etchings 
and fancy prints. Tin- very best qoalltj of frames and frame 
materials are to be bail at Morris'. There is always apieturesbow 
ol interest in the gallery that is being added to day by day with the 
best work of native and foreign artists. 



San FranCiSCO < Wm. Larse n, Manager 



Novelty Leather Co. 



Manufacturers of the California Brand Ladies' and Gents' 
Fine Belts and Pocket Books. All kinds of Leather 
Novelties. Leather and Canvas Sportine Goods. 
Our Specialty: Mexican Carved Leather Goods. 
Medical, Surgical and all kinds of Drummers' Cases. 



412 Market street, 



Telephone Bush 94 



San Francisco 



Oregon Short Line 

Only two days to Butte. 
Shortest line to Utah, 
Idaho and Montana Points. 

D. W. HITCHCOCK, General Agent, 
1 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 



McMENOMY Established 1866. 



Telephone Main 1481. 



Is the leading Retail Butcher 
of San Francisco : : : : 



Supplying of families a specialty. 

Stalls 7, 8, and 9 California Market. 



Blake, Moffit & Towne Telephone m^m 

Dealers in PAPER 



Bloke, Moffit & Towne. Los Antreles. 
Blake. MoFall & Co.. Portland, Or. 



55-57-59-61 First street, S. F. 



CITY STREET IMPROVEMENT CO. 

Proprietors Fifth floor, Mills Building, San Franoisco 

D!iniv.rt« K A \ v* .«-«. m Santa Cruz and Kine City, 
DltUmeri MineS Monterey county, Cal. 

Contractors for all kinds of street work, bridges and railway construction, 
wharves, jetties and seawalls. 

FINE IMPORTED 

$30 == Scotch Tweeds == $40 

Also a large line of High-Gkade Serges, Worsteds. 
Veatings, Golf Knickerbockers, and Hose : : : : 

C|-vf»pjja| Have just received from London shipment of novelties in 
JpCCIui Ladies' Costume Cloths. Inspection Invited. 

CRAIQ BROTHERS, Importing Tailors 

120 Sutter Street, bet, Kearny and Montgomery streets. Take elevator. 



18 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEK. 



January 27, 1900. 




WHILE the season is uot, after all, proving so bewild- 
eringly gay as was hoped at its opening, owing to 
the number of buds who were to debut, there is still 
enough going on to prevent its being called dull. This 
week, for instance, has had something on the tapis for 
every day and evening, though in the main they were 
small affairs. First on the list comes Mrs. Rudolph 
Spreckels' luncheon on Monday to twelve of her lady 
friends, when the decoratioas, which were both elaborate 
and beautiful, and the dainty favors as well, were Japan- 
ese in character, the menu being the only Caucasian thing 
about the affair. Among those present were Mrs. Bowie- 
Detrick, Mrs. Oxnard, Mrs. J. K. R. Nultall, Mrs. 
Schwerin, Mrs. Wm. Irwin, Mrs. Garceau, Mrs. Hyde- 
Smith, Miss Laura McKinstry, Miss Hattie Jolliffe. 

On Monday afternoon, also, the California Chapter of 
the Daughters of the American Revolution met at the 
residence of Mrs. Ira Pierce, when she and her sister, 
Mrs. Cyrus Walker, were the joint hostesses. Miss Maud 
Newton Woods' tea, dinner and dance on Monday after- 
noon was a delightful pleasure long drawn out; many 
friends crowded the prettily decorated rooms during the 
afternoon, and those at dinner and the dance which 
followed afterwards were the Misses Alice Chipman, 
Grace Sanborn, Alma McClung, Prances Baldwin, Grace 
and Lillie Spreckels, Bernie Drown, Jennette Hooper, 
Coleman, Maud and Lotty Woods, Harold Smith, E. de la 
Vega, William Sanborn, Aylett Cotton, Burbank Somers, 
John Lewis, Percy Williams, Lawrence Scott, M. de Con- 
Ian, Chester Smith, and Dr. Eugene Zeile. Monday even- 
ing was largely given over to theatre and concert parties, 
Mme. Nevada at the California and Trebelli at Sherman 
Clay Hall being the bright stars which attracted them. 

Mrs. Fillmore's "at home" on Tuesday was well at- 
tended, as was the tea given by Mrs. Nelly Hyde-Smith, 
which was for the double purpose of honoring her sister, 
Mrs. Garceau, who is visiting her mother, Mrs. Hyde, and 
to welcome home 1 Mrs. Bowie-Detrick from her trip to 
Japan, from whence she arrived by the steamer Doric last 
Friday. 

On Wednesday Mrs. A. M. Parrott gave a good-bye 
dinner prior to ber departure next week for Europe and 
another of Wednesday's gatherings was Mrs. Sam Buck- 
bee's costume dinner. Yet another was the annual recep- 
tion given by Bishop and Mrs. Nichols at the Occidental 
and which proved to be a very pleasant one, there was a 
thronged attendance, good music and delicious refresh- 
ments, the newly arrived Rector for Trinity Church com- 
ing in for a good share of attention from the Bishop's 
guests. On Thursday Mrs. E. R. Dimond was the hostess 
of an elaborate card party at her Pacific avenue residence; 
the votaries of terpsichore had a gala time last night be- 
tween the Colonial bal poudre of the Entre Nous Club and 
the Army and Navy cotillion of La Jeunesse Club. To-day 
Mrs. G. W. Irwin gives a very large progressive euchre 
party to which the ladies will sit down at four o'clock; and 
Mrs. H. B. Montague will open her pretty rooms for a tea 
in honor of Mrs. Chas. Bentley. 

To-night the Saturday Fortnightly Club meets in 
Cotillion Hall. In church circles it has been quite lively 
this week for besides the daily attendance at the Conven- 
tion services held in Trinity Church, the receptions of the 
Bishop and of the ladies' auxiliary, and the clerical dinner 
at the Occidental last night, the presence of so many 
delegates in the city has been taken advantage of by their 
friends for a series of hospitalities in the way of luncheons 
and dinners. Apropos of church affairs the ladies of the 
Church of the Advent are busily engaged in getting up a 
concert which is to be given in the ballroom of the Bella 
Vista in the near future. 

There are a number of gay doings on the tapis for next 
week. The golf dance in the club house on the Presidio 
links on Monday night promises to be a success if the 
weather prove at all propitious. On Tuesday Miss Lillie 
Follis gives an elaborate luncheon party at her home on 
Washington street to upwards of sixty guests. Mrs. 



Loughborough will also be a luncheon hostess on Tuesday. 
The colonial reception of the California Club on Tuesday 
evening promises to be one of the events of the season, the 
idea has "caught on" and some fetching toilettes are in 
course of preparation to be worn that night. On Friday 
evening the Friday Fortnightlies will have their usual 
dance in Cotillion Hall. 

Recently announced engagements are those of Mrs. 
Bertha Welch Russell to Eugene Lent, and of Miss May 
Averill to R. R. Belknap, U. S. N. 

Mrs. Stanford's reception last Saturday afternoon at 
her California street mansion was enjoyed by a large 
number of guests. The beautiful house was gaily decked 
with flowers, the Hawaiian band gave a succession of 
pleasing musical selections and delicious refreshments 
were served. 

The departure of two of the hostesses of our Swim is 
much regretted by those who have so frequently enjoyed 
their hospitality. First there is Mrs. Walter Dean, who 
accompanied by her daughter Miss Helen, has decided to 
make a lengthened visit at Coronado, and the several 
functions they had planned to give before Lent will be 
postponed until the Eastertide. Then Mrs. A. M. Parrott, 
who no matter at what sacrifice of personal comfort and 
inclination always responds so quickly to duty's calls, is on 
the eve of departure for Scotland to remain with her 
daughter, Mrs. Douglass -Dick, while the gallant Captain 
Dick is off in South Africa fighting the Boers. 

Mrs. H. B. Chase, who has been visiting Mrs. Millie 
Ashe Sewall in Honolulu, has taken a cottage near the 
beach with the intention of remaining in the Islands until 
March. Mrs. Sewall has given several entertainments in 
her honor as well as that of her mother, Mrs. Ashe, and 
Mrs. Monty Wilson, who are also visiting Honolulu, includ- 
ing teas, luncheons and dinners at which all the local cele- 
brities have been well represented. 

At the Hotel Rafael the winter season continues mer- 
rily. The flowers in the hotel grounds were never more 
beautiful than they are now, and the roads are in fine 
form for riding and driving. The management of the big 
hotel is notable for the comforts and consideration given 
the guests — all the comforts of a home and none of its 
troubles. 

A professional golf tournament will take place on the 
Burlingame Country Club links on Thursday, February 
22nd next, over thirty-six holes, medal play, for the fol- 
lowing prizes: First prize, $75; second prize, $45; third 
prize, $20. Play will begin at 10 a. m. The privileges of 
the club are extended to members of San Rafael, Oakland 
and San Francisco Golf Clubs for the day of the match. 

The office and bureau of information of the Southern 
Pacific Company during the International Exposition of 
1900 in Paris, will be at No. 29 Boulevard des Italiens. 
Residents of States and Territories served by its lines are 
cordially invited to make its office headquarters for all 
information concerning steamship or railroad travel, or 
accommodations in Paris. Their letters may be addressed 
care of the office. A directory of their Parisian addresses 
will be kept and all persons desiring to avail themselves of 
the courtesies offered are requested to register. 

The famous Sea Beach Hotel at Santa Cruz is now 
under the management of John S. Matheson. It is being 
thoroughly refitted and supplied with modern improve- 
ments, and bids fair to entertain this season hundreds 
who love comfort, sea air and good living. The date of 
the opening will soon be announced. 

UNDER the able management of Galindo & Rothberg, 
the Original Vienna Cafe and Bakery, at 205 Kearny 
street, is rapidly becoming one of the most popular restau- 
rants in the city. Quick service, dainty dishes and fault- 
less attention, together with popular prices, have brought 
this about. It is a most select luncheon place for ladies. 

PERSONAL— If your hair is not satisfactory it can be made so 
safely, quickly, lastingly, and at slight expense. Gray hair 
restored to its original color, bleached hair to any shade, falling: hair stop- 
ped, luxuriant hair produced. Booklet and particulars free. Imperial 
Chemical Mfg. Co., 22 West 23d St., New York, Dept. No. 66. 

In San Francisco sold by: GOLDSTEIN & COKN, 822 Market street; S 
STROZYNSKI, 24 Geary street, OWI, DRUG COMPANY. 1128 Marke 
street: and all druggists and hair dressers. 



January 17, 1900. 



SAN I 



19 



THE EXHIBITION OF BRONZES AND V* 

«• xbibilion of bmr .-..-•.. metal .11 
is hoinjf held at the Mark Bopklu li.*titute of Art. 
Tbe exhibition opened with a reception to the men. 
the Art Association on Thursday evening, ut which an ex- 
cellent programme of orchestral music was rendered, mi 
der the direction of Mr. Henry Hevman. The collection 
numbers over one hundred bronzes, representing a number 
of nationalities and periods. The display of .I.11 
bronzes Is particularly interesting : in fact, so varied and 
complete as to render it difficult to particularize. There 
are temple bronzes of the Tokugawa period with theToku- 
gawa badge inlaid in cold. An incense burner that was taken 
from one of tbe Buddhist Temples in the interior of Japan at 
tbe time that many of tbe Buddhist temples were secular- 
ized after the Revolutionof 1868. On the back is the Imperial 
Emblem showing it to have been presented to the temple 
by one of the imperial families. The temple koro or in- 
cense burner, which stands some fourteen feet in height, 
occupying a prominent place in the main gallery, is already 
familiar to many of the visitors to the institute. There is 
also a Chinese incense burner with ebonied and jade top 
elaborately carved, which is very old. There is a Japan- 
ese dragon made some five hundred years ago by Nobuiye 
Miyochin, one of the foremost artists of that day. It is 
made of minute pieces of iron, hand carved and joined 
in some uudiscoverable manner so that tne whole body is 
flexible to a remarkable degree. We may also mention 
amongst the modern Japanese bronzes a tiger admirably 
executed by Aki Chika, a professor in the Fine Art School 
of Tokio and a renowned sculptor of animals. 

There are great numbers of vases and urns of ancient 
and modern Japanese and Chinese manufacture of all con- 
ceivable shapes, some very beautiful and some very quaint. 
After the Japanese bronzes come the modern French 
bronzes in importance. This collection inemdes examples 
of nearly all the famous modern French artists. The most 
notable work is that entitled "Atropos," by Gustave Dore. 
It represents the grim figure Fate severing, with her 
shears, the thread of life, while Love, with broken bow 
and overturned hour-glass, stands disconsolate at her 
knees. This is a copy from the last and greatest of Dore's 
work, the original being executed in marble. There are 
several small but beautiful pieces of the famous sculptor, 
Barye. An admirable display of copies from the antique 
have been provides for the iovers of classical grace and 
symmetry. These include nearly all the famous statues of 
ancient Greece and Rome, and a great many of the 
articles found in the ruins of Pompeii. In addition to 
these copies are several original bronzes found at Hercu- 
laneum, and also an old Roman ring disinterred recently in 
London while excavations were being made in the new 
Law Courts. A number of Russian bronzes of excellent 
workmanship, among which may be mentioned "The 
Travelers," a most elaborately carved piece representing 
a troika driven at a furious pace and crowding a peasant 
cart off the road. Other fine illustrations of Russian 
workmanship are "The Vodki Venders," by Posene, of St. 
Petersburg, and "The Cossack's Farewell." 

While the exhibition of vases is not as extensive as that 
of the bronzes, and, indeed, was merely intended to lend 
variety to the collection, it comprises some very rare and 
beautiful specimens. There is a magnificent vase of the 
renowned "Sang de Boeuf," and a magnificent Cloisonne 
vase. There is a beautiful old Dutch delft and some ele- 
gant French vases of the First Empire. There are two 
exquisite Royal Danish vases, one with a landscape and 
the other with turtles, by Ussing, and there is also a 
Cloisonne' tea jar fit for an emperor, and no doubt orig- 
inally made for an imperial household. 

The exhibition is remarkable in many ways, and is at- 
tracting a great deal of attention. It will remain open 
for one week, closing Thursday evening, February 1st, 
with a concert. 

An Enormous Industry. 
Oar enormous facilities, tremendous output, rapid movement of 
goods always fresh in the hands of consumers, insures the Gail Bor- 
den Eagle Brand Condensed Milk the first place in American home?. 



iHflDEA^iGII 




WE RESTORE 
SIGHT I_ 

GLASSES 
RENDER 
DEFECTIVE 
VISION 
CHRONIC. 

I lur our 

■'illustrated 
treatise. 
mailed free. 




Napa Soda Springs new management. Two hours from San 
Francisco. Open all the year. Try it from Saturday to Monday. 
A. Dollman proprietor, A. Gotard chef. 



Alaska Commercial Co. 



FOR - 



i>lome, 5t. (T\ief?ael, Dau/soQ 



And all points on Yukon River 



For NONE direct : 

From San Franci<co, S. S. Portland April 30, 1900 

From Seattle, S. S. Dora April 30, 1900 

Trom San Francisco, S. S. Rainier , May 10, 1900 

For Nome, St. nichael. and all other points 

From Francisco, S. S. St. Paul May 25, 1900 

A steamer will be dispatched every fortnight thereafter. 



For Juneau, Sitka, Prince William 
Sound, Cook's Inlet, Kodiak, ^^l^' m " a \ 

From Seattle S.S. Bertha, commencing April 8th 

And monthly thereafter. 



For new folders, maps, and further particulars as to freight and 
passage, apply to Alaska Commercial Company, 310 Sansome St.,' 
San Francisco, Cal. For Seattle sailings apply to Capt. Jas. Car- 
roll, Mutual Life Building, Seattle. Washington. 



GRAY BROTHERS 



(^oncrete and Artificial 
STONE WORK 



228 Montgomery Street, S. F. 
205 New High St., Los Angeles. 



La Grande Laundry 



Telephone Bush 12 

Principal office, 23 Powell street, opposite Baldwin Hotel. 
Branch— 11 Taylor street, near Golden Gate avenue 
Laundry— Twelfth street, between Folsom and Howard 
streets. San Francisco. 

SUPERFLUOUS HAIR 

painlessly and effectually 
removed by the Electric Needle. One course of my treatment, I 
positively guarantee, extirpates these unsightly imperfections with- 
out mark or injury to the most delicate skin. Consultation free and 
confidential. Instruction given in any branch of the business. 
MISS BARRETT, Dermatologist, 1207 Market St., Opp. City Hall. 



20 



SAN FEANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



January 27, 1900. 




5UNBCAM5 




STOLEN FROM THIKVK9. 



"I find from this paper," observed Mrs. Bad 'Un, 
"that a double chin denotes character and determination. 
Now, I'm glad that I have such a pronounced double chin. " 
"Anna Maria," gurgled Bad 'Un, "the paper doesn't say 
that it is necessary to work all your chins at one time, 
does it?" "No, you muddle-headed fool, it does not," re- 
turned Mrs. Bad 'Un, sweetly. "The advantage of hav- 
ing a double chin is that you can work one while the other 
rests. Do you understand, you old whisky cask?" "I 
do, Anna Maria, love. But will you be so good as to in- 
form me when you are going to give one of your chins a 
rest?" And then the flight of the crockery commenced 
iu real earnest. 

— "Isn't there something in my policy," asked a caller 
at an insurance office the other day, "about my 'having 
to report any change of residence?" "Yes, sir," said the 
man at the nearest desk, picking up a pen, "where have 
you moved to?" " I haven't moved anywhere," rejoined 
the caller. " I have made a chauge in my residence by 
painting it a light straw-color and putting a chimney-pot 
on the kitchen chimney. I think that's all. Good-bye." 

— Mrs. Caudle — How do you dare to come back from 
the tavern so late as this? Mr. Caudle— Yes, you are 
rightl I'm an unworthy husband, and a drunkard, and 
I must turn over a new leaf. Mrs. Caudle (at first 
speechless, then breaking out in anger) — What do you 
mean? Am I to read the curtain lectures here or are you? 

— Husband — Some one at the restaurant to-day started 
to carry off my overcoat, but I recognized it as he was 
passing by these two buttons that are missing. Wipe (in 
triumph) — And to whom are you indebted for the fact that 
the buttons were not sewed on? 

— Mamma — I'm very sorry, but I'll have to send you 
both to bed without any supper, for you have not learned 
your lessons. Edie — If you're really sorry, ma, have 
something for supper we don't like. 

— "I've been shopping every day this week." "Then 
you must be ready for winter now, Mrs. Miggs." "No; 
one day I bought a pair of shoes and the other five days I 
bought a hat." 

— Tommy's Mother — Why is it, Tommy, that you are al- 
ways fighting with Willie Simpkins? I never heard of you 
quarrelling with any of the other boys in the neighborhood. 
Tommy — He's th' on'y one I kin lick. 

— "She says she hasn't worn half her new gowns yet 
this season." "Indeed 1 I should have said from her ap- 
pearance that she was in the habit of wearing just about 
half." 

— "I do wish, Adele, dear, that another time when you 
want to scold me before the servants you'd do it in French, 
so they won't understand." 

— "Well, rain falls on the just and the unjust." "Not 
much; the unjust steal umbrellas." 

There is nothing so dangerous to health and comfort as an un- 
clean carpet. Many people delay having their carpets cleaned be- 
cause they dread the trouble and the delay. The Spaulding Carpet 
Cleaning Works, 353 Tehama street does away with all this by using 
special machinery and employing expert workmen. Quick work and 
easy prices. 

1 1' yotj want an exquisite luncheon, dinner or breakfast served and 
cooked in real Parisian style go to the Maison Riche at the corner of 
Grant avenue and Geary street. The Riche has long been known as 
the epicure's paradise. It's name is a familiar one to the good livers 
of the world. 



BANKING 



Never in allits popular career has the Cafe Zinkand enjoyed a 
greater popularity than at the present moment. Everybody goes to 
the Zinkand after the play for the finest of wines, beers and suppei - 
and the inimitable music of Stark's string orchestra. It is the 
favorite resort of club men and society women. 

Centbal Cafe, coffee and luncheon parlor, 211 Gran;, avenue. The 
place to get a fine steak, teuder chop, excellent coffee, tea and pure 
milk. Neat and prompt service. M. D. Christensen, proprietor. 



London and San Francisco Bank, Limited 

Authorized Capita!. 83,500.000. Capital Subscribed and Fully Paid, $2,450,000 

N D Rideout, Managing Director 

Gustav Friederich, Cashier 

Arthur L. Black, Assistant Cashier 

HEAD OFFICE— 71 Lombard street. London. 
PORTLAND BRANCH— Chamber ol Commerce Buildiner. 
TACOMA BRANCH— 1156 Pacific Avenue. 

Bankers—Bank of England. London Joint Stock Bank. Limited. 

Agents in New York— J. P. Morgan & Co. 
This bank is prepared to grant letters of eredit available in any part of the 
world and to transact every description of banking and exchange business 

Bank of British Columbia 

S. E. cor. Bush and Sansonie Sts. Incorporated by Royal Charter, 1862. 

HEAD OFFICE: 60 Lombard St., London. 

Capital Paid Up. 83.000,000. Reserve Fund. 8500,000. 

BRANCHES— Victoria, Vancouver, New Westminster. Kamloops, Nam- 
amo. Nelson Rossland, Sandon, British Columbia; Portland, Oregon. 

This bank transacts a general banking business. Accounts opened sub- 
ject to check, and special deposits received. Commercial credits granted 
available in all parts of the world. Approved bills discounted and advances 
made on good collateral security. Draws direct at current rates upon its 
head office and branches, and upon its aeents. as follows: 

New York— Merchants' Bank of Canada; Chicago— First National Bank; 
Liverpool— North and South Walts Bank; Scotland— British Linen Com- 
pany; Ireland — Bank of Ireland; Mexico — London Bank of Mexico; Sooth 
America— London Bank of Mexico and South America; China and Japan — 
Chartered Bank of India, Australia and China; Australia and New Zea- 
land — Bank of Australasia and Commercial Banking Company of Sydney. 
Ld.; Demerara and Trinidad (West Indies)— Colonial Bank. 

Also on Dawson City, Yukon district, arrangements having been made 
with the Canadian Bank of Commerce whereby it is prepared to issue drafts 
and letters of credit on that bank at above point, and transact other banking 
business. Terms upon application. 

London, Paris and American Bank, Limited 

N. W. Coe. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

Subscribed Capital J2.500,000 Paid-Up Capital. 82,000.000 

Reserve Fund. 8850.000 

HEAD OFFICE— 40 Threadneedle street, London, E. C. 

AGENTS: New York— Asrency of the London, Paris and American Bank, 
Limited, No. 10 Wall street, N. Y. ; Paris — Messrs. Lazard Freres & Cie, 17 
Boulevard Poissoniere. Draw direct on the principal cities of the world. 
Commercial and Travelers' Credits issued. 

SIG. GREENEBAUM. C. ALTSCHUL, Managers. 
R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier. 

The San Francisco National Bank 

Southeast corner of Pine and Sansome Sts., San Francisco, 
Jas. K. Wilson, President Wm. Pierce Johnson, Vice-President 

Lewis I. Cowgill, Cashier F. W. Wolfe, Assistant Cashier 

CAPITAL, $500,000 

DtRECTORS-James K. Wilson, D. J. Staples, Wm. Pierce Johnson. Geo. 
A. Pope. H. E. Huntington, John Barton, C. S. Benedict. 

AGENTS ; New York— Hanover National Bank, Chase National Bank: 
Chemical National Bank, Boston— National Bank of the Commonwealth 
Philadelphia— Drexel & Co.; Chicago— Continental National Bank. St. Louis 
— The Mechanics' Bank. Kansas City— First National Bank. London- 
Brown. Shipley & Co. Paris— Morgan, Harjes & Co. 

Germania Trust Company of San Francisco 

42 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 
Authorized Capital, $1,000,000 Paid-TJp Capital and Reserve, $375,000 

Authorized to act as Executor, Administrator. Guardian, or Trustee. 

Check Accounts of individuals, firms, and corporations solicited. 

Legal Depository for money in Probate Court proceedings. Interest 
paid on trust deposits and SAVINGS. Investments carefully selected 
for pur clients. 

Board of Directors— Ernst A. Denicke, F. Kronenberg, J. C. Rued, A. 
Sbarboro. F. C. Siebe, Albert G. Wieland. H. P. Sonntag, John Rapp, H. 
Brunner. 

Officers— Ernst A. Denicke, President; F. Kronenberg, vice-President; H. 
Brunner Cashier 

The Anglo-Californian Bank, Limited 

N. E. Cor. Pine and Sansome Sts. 

Head Office— 18 Austin Friars, London, E. C 

Capital Authorized $6,000,000 Paid Up $1,500,000 

Subscribed 3,000,000 Reserve Fund... 700,000 

Agents at New York— J. & W. Seligman & Co. 21 Broad street. 
The bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes tele- 
graphic transfers, and issues letters of credit available throughout the world. 
Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells exchange and bullion. 

IGN. STEINHART. P. N. T.TTJENTHAL, Managers. 

Security Savings Bank 

222 Montgomery St.. Mills Building. 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans made. 

DIRECTORS. 

William Alvord S. L. Abbot, Jr. H. H. Hewlett 

William Baboock O. D. Baldwin E. J. McCutohen 

Adam Grant W, S. Jones R. H. Pease 



January 27, 1900 



BAN ] !Tll: 



31 



l^-Ro^^ 



WHAT SHALL WE DO? 

What *hall we do with thi< great lore of ours. 

Now that we know our pathways must diviJe— 
This living fire that like a flame devours. 

This wave that sweeps on like an angry tide? 

Here, now, for evermore our lives must part: 

My path leads there, ana yours the other way. 

What shall we do with our fond love, dear heart? 
It grows a heavier burden day by day. 

Hide it? In all earth's caverns void and vast 
There are not depths enough to hide it, dear. 

Not even the mighty storehouse of the Fast 
Could cover it from our own eyes. I fear. 

Drown it? Why were the contents of each ocean 
Merged into one great sea, too shallow then 

Would be its waters to sink this emotion— 
80 deep, it could not rise to life again. 

Burn it? In all the furnace flames below 
It would not in a thousand years expire; 

Nay. it would thrive— expand— exult and grow; 
For from its very birth it fed on fire. 

Starve it? Yes. yes, that is the only way- 
Give it no food of glance, or word or sigh; 

No memories, even, of any bygone day. 
No crumbs of vain regret— just let it die. 

Starvation is a painful death ; long hours 
Of gnawing hunger like the pangs of hell. 

And if we, too, die with this love of ours— 
If our hearts break— why, it is just as well. 



BANKING 



THE CHORISTERS.— Atlanta constitution. 

There's a little band of singers 

Every evening comes and lingers 
Neath the window of my cottage in the trees; 

And with dark they raise their voices, 

While the gathering night rejoices, 
And the leaves join in the chorus with the breeze. 

Then the twinkling stars come out 

To enjoy the merry rout, 
And the squirrels range themselves upon a log; 

And the fireflies furnish light, 

That they read their notes aright — 
The katydid, the cricket and the frog. 

All the night I hear them singing; 

Through my head their tunes are ringing — 
Strains of music straight from Mother Nature's heart; 

Now the katydid and cricket. 

From the deep of yonder thicket; 
Then the croaking frog off yonder drones his part. 

By and by the moon appears, 

As the midnight hour nears, 
And her smiles dispel the low'ring mist and fog; 

Then the mirth is at its height, 

And they glorify the night — 
The katydid, the cricket and the frog. 



SWEETHEART, FAREWELL.-w/u//i« cowan- 

Beneath the whispering trees we lingered late, 
Hand clasped in hand, my dearest love and I, 

And he spake words 1 never can forget, 
Of tender trust and love, until I die; 

And with his eyes what lips would fall to tell 

He spoke, what time he said: "Sweetheart, farewell." 

With sweet caress he clasped me to his breast, 
And looked upon me as with angel's eyes. 

And kissed my brow, and kissed my lips, and kissed 
The tears away that now began to rise ; 

And ever the same tale of love would tell, 

What time he sadly spoke: "Sweetheart, farewell/ 

And so he went away, and I am weary 

Of nature's smiles— my heart is full of strife— 

The long, long days without him are so dreary, 
And all the bright has faded out of life, 
1 Come back, my love, the old sweet tale to tell, 

But nevermore to say: 'Sweetheart, farewell.' " 



Bank of California, San Francisco 

BUTplOft, tl - 

PraAl null i 
Willi \M \! VORD Prwrtdenl I * 1 1 KMJSB H, BIWIOP, Vfc i 

\l 1 KN M. ' I \N -• - Utr) ! I IK»M \* IWtnWN 

-MITII. \ I MOl LTO 

OORREBPOKDKNTS 

N>w^ LaldlnwA Co.: the Bank ol (Cow York, v. B. \. 

BalUmoi rohan*e Bank. Boston National Shaw mul 

Bank. ' i» TnwH and ink: Union National Bank. 

Philadelphia— Philadelphia National Hunk. st. Loali Boatman'* Bank. 
Vtrifini Vffenoy "f Tin- Itiitik <.f California, London Moasra. 

N, M i 3on«. Parli Moasrs, de Rotbaohlld Preraa. Berlin— 

Direction der Dlsoonta Ooeellaohaft, China, Japan, and Baal fadles— Char- 
tered Bnnk of India, Australia, and China. Australia and New Zealand— 'ITie 
Union Bank "I Australia, Ltd., and Bunk <■( New Zealand, 

Lassen ol oradll Issued available in nil pari- of the world. 

San Francisco Savings Union 

589 CALIFORNIA STREET. S. F. 

isltsJulyl, 1899, 134,920.81 i Reserve Fund Iar»'21fi 

Paid-up Capita! I.noo.noo Contingent Fund 448,788 

W. 0. B. DeFREMERY, Vice-President 
R. M. WELCH, Assistant Cashier 



E. B. POND, President 

LOVELL WHITE. Cashier 



Directors*— George W. Beaver, Thomas Magce. W. C. B. de Fremcry. Al- 
bert Miller, Kob.rt Watt. George C. Boardman, Daniel E. Martin, George 
Taahelra, K. B. Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco und Oakland real estate, and farms and f firming 
lands in the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may be mnde in checks payable 
in San Francisco, Post Office, or Wells Fargo & Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p. m., and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only. 6:30 to 8 o'clock. 

Wells Fargo & Co.. Bank 

N. E. Cor. Sansome and Sutter Sts. 

JOHN J. VALENTINE, President H. WADSWORTH, Cashier 

HOMER 9. KING. Manager F. L. LIPMAN. Assistant Cashier 

H. L. MILLER, Second Assistant Cashier. 

Cash Capital and Surplus $6,250,000 

Branches— New York City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier: Salt Lake City, J. E. 

Dooly, Cashier: Portland, Or., R. M. Dooly. Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— John ,T. Valentine, Andrew Christeson, Oliver Eldridge, 

Henry E. Huntington. Homer S. King, George E.Gray, John J. McCook, 

John Bermingham, Dudley Evans. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital 81,000.000. Paid Up Capital $300,000 

James D. Phelan. President S. G. Murphy, Vice-PreBident 

George A. Story, Cashier John A. Hooper, Vice-Presiden 

C. B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier. 

"Rate of Interest on L- ans secured by improved 

San Francisco Real Estate - - SIX PER CENT 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 
Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells. Fargo &'Co,, or Exchange on 
city banks. When opening acoounts send signature. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 OALD70RNIA STREET. SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus 82,2 13.1 46.59 

Capital actually paid up in Cash 1.00P 000 00 

Deposits Deeember 30. 1899 28,563.655.41 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President. B. A. Becker; First Vice-President 
Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstman: Cashier, A. H. R. 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary. George Tourny 
Assistant Secretary. A. H. Muller; General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Ign. S^inhart, E. Rohte, H. B. Russ, D. N, Walter, N. Ohlandt, and John 
Lloyd 

Continental Building X Loan Association 

Established in 1889. OP CALIFORNIA. 
Subscribed Capital ..810,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund. ..8210,000 
Paid-in-Capital 1,500,000 Monthly Income, over 100,000 

iTa Purpose is to help its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on improved property, the members giving first liens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help its Stockholders to earn 10 to 12 per cent, interest on their stook 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearing interest at the rate of 5 
per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits and 6 per cent, per annum on 
Term Deposits. 

Home Office— 222 Sansome St.. San Francisco, Cal. 

Wm. Corbin, Secretary and General Manager 



Crocker- Wool Worth 



National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Stb. 

Paid- up- Capital 81,000,000 

Wm. H. Crocker, President Geo. W. Kline, Cashier 

W. E. Brown, Vice-President W. Gregg, Jr., Assistant Cashier 

Directors— W. H. Crocker, E. B. Pond, W. E. Brown, C. E. Green, G. W, 
Kline, Henry J. Crocker, G. W. Soott. 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTER 



January 27, 1900. 



AN ACTOR DISCUSSES AN ACTOR. 

FROBABLY do actor of the present time, in any coun- 
try, has caused more controversy than Henry Irving, 
Opinions of varying shades, and as wide asunder as the 
poles, have been passed on his acting ever since the 
memorable occasion, more than twenty-five years ago, 
when he took London by storm with Matthias in "The 
Bells." 

It may perhaps be regarded as a sign of his greatness 
that dispute should bave always waxed warm regarding 
his merits or demerits ; mediocrity never causes anything 
but indifference. 

But while his contemporaries look at him from such 
conflicting points of view it may be interesting to consider, 
how will he be esteemed by posterity ? 

It would seem that what is conceded to him now will 
surely be granted him by succeeding generations. He is 
universally admitted to be the most lavish and artistic 
producer the modern stage has known. He is also allowed 
to be a great stage manager, a fine melodramatic actor — 
probably one of the most effective the English stage has 
ever possessed; witness his Matthias, Eugene Aram, 
Louis XI, Richelieu, Lesurques and Dubosc. As a char- 
acter actor and comedian he has proved himself to be 
par excellence by his Digby Grant, Jingle, Jeremy Diddler, 
Benedick, Dorincourt, Bill Sykes. Butit is on his standing 
as a tragedian that opinions are so diverse, and it is by 
that standard posterity will probably pass its judgment. 
Physically, some consider he is not completely equipped 
for tragic roles, notwithstanding his expressive face; 
he is undoubtedly not a strODg man, but he has a 
nervous force, which he uses with electrifying effect on 
occasions, as for instance, the end of the play scene in 
Hamlet. 

He unquestionably has great dignity and intense power 
of expressing pathos, together with marvelous subtlety 
in depicting the emotions and showing the workings of 
the human mind. These qualities make his Hamlet, Shy- 
lock, Richard III. worthy a place beside the delineations 
of the great tragedians of the past. Some observers are 
doubtless affected in their estimate of Irving by his man- 
nerisms and diction (it should be remembered that few 
great tragedians have been without mannerisms), but he 
has been able to win the place he fills, and sway the peo- 
ple with his magnetic power in spite of them; and pos- 
terity, to whom these mannerisms can be but tradition, 
will not be influenced, as are those who witness them. 

There is another quantity in the equation of IrviDg's 
future fame to be considered — his personal characteristics. 
The dignity of his conduct, his refusal to accept patron- 
age, the influence he has had on the social condition of the 
actor, and above all, his large-hearted benevolence, which 
has made itself felt so widely and so unostentatiously, will 
surely have some weight when future judges shall be hold- 
ing the scales, and his name must shine clearly among 
those of Garrick, Kean, Forrest, Talma and Bouth. 

The actor's work dies with him, only the mfmory re- 
mains. — J. P. Dodson in the Criterion. 



— Usher (the court having been much annoyed by the 
shuffling of feet) — Will ye hold yer tongues up there with 
yer feet in the gallery. 

— 'What are you doing, Miss Giglamps?" "I'm picking 
out the plays and concerts somebody has got to take me 
to this winter." 

THE "OVERLAND LIMITED " -A Solid Vestibuled Train 
Via the UNION PACIFIC leaves San Francisco daily at 8.00 a. m. 
Breakfast served in dining Car. 

Three days to Chicago without change. One day quicker than 
any other line. 

Finest modern Pullman equipment, including library and buffet 
cars and dining cars, a la carte. D. W. Hitchcock, No. 1 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco. 



ASK THE TICKET AGENT to send you from Chicago to New 
York, Boston, or other Eastern cities, over the Nickel Plate [N. 
'/. C. & St. L. R. R.] Quick time, satisfactory service and no 
extra fares charged passengers. Jay W. Adams, Pacific Coast 
Passenger Agent, 37 Crocker Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

The most comfortable way to travel to Portland and all points 
in the Northwest is by the steamers of The Oregon Railroad & 
Vsvigation Co., E. C. Ward, General Agent, G30 Market street, 8. F. 



TWO MORALLESS FABLES. 



AN Ambitious Man who had been obliged to live in the 
basement of the temple of Pame, woke up one morn- 
ing to find near him a ladder which led to an upper story. 
He was so overjoyed because the long-waited for oppor- 
tunity had at last been given him, that he pitched several 
growlers by way of celebration. 

But when he finally started to mount, because of the 
dizziness of his head, and the preversity of Pate, he fell 

and broke his neck. 

* * * 

Very early one morning a Politician while trying to 
steal the Statue of Liberty, discovered crouching beneath 
it, the Public Good. 

"Ah, good morning," said the Politician, cordially ex- 
tending his hand, "glad to see you. You are just the per- 
son I am looking for." 

" Yes," answered the Public Good shrinking away, "so 
I heard. That is why I hid." 

THE French writer chosen as the third annual lecturer 
of the "Cercle Francais de l'Universite Harvard" to 
speak before Harvard University, in 1900, is the poet 
Monseiur Henri de Regnier. M. de Regnier will deliver 
eight lectures on "French Modern Poetry," beginning 
March 1st. Among the places he will visit besides Har- 
vard, we can cite: Adelphi College, of Brooklyn; Alliance 
Francaise, New Yorkj Brooklyn Institute of Arts and 
Sciences, Brown University, Bryn Mawr College, Cercle 
Francaise de 1'AlliaDce, BostoD; University of California, 
University of Chicago, Columbia, Cornell, Mount Holyoke, 
Packer Institute, of Brooklyn; University of Pennsyl- 
vania, Princeton. San Francisco, Vassar, Wellesley, Wells, 
Williams, Yale University, etc. 

No tuau glories in the fact that he is bald ; take warning in time if 
your scalp itches, it is just a reminder that you will sooner or later 
become bald. TJse Smith's Dandruff Pomade, the only positive cure 
for itching scalp. 

Allen's Press Clipping Bureau. 510 Montgomery street. San Francisco. 
deals in all kinds of newspaper Information, business, personal, political 
from press of State, coast and oountry. Tel. Main 1042. 

Everyone May Have the 
Luxury of a Bath 



In five minutes at any 
time of the day or night 



For One Cent 




By tiuvintra NONPAREIL HEATER in their bath room. 
For further particulars address: 

Nonpareil Instantaneous Water Heater Co. 

of the U. S., Inc. 

A. W. Cbawford, General Agent, 324 Parrott Building. San Francisco. 



January 17, 1900. 



SAN I ,lli: 



2 3 



ff\ 


Wb 


* |'^^3 vvfiKvrt 




m> 


~e) /*\l |fl(©J 





IN oldeo times mantel-pieces were objects of art and 
beauty that put to shame our machine-made modern 
ones. In the interests of good taste, let me beg you to 
eschew the elahorate and overladen mantel-pieces, the 
gates of burnished steel with laid-on ormolu-mouldings that 
are as hideous in shape as they are extravagant in price. 
Get a really good mantel-piece that will fit in with its 
surroundings, remembering always that what is eminently 
fit for the dining-room is utterly unsuited to the bedroom, 
and vice versa, while a mantelpiece proper for a room of 
large dimensions richly and perhaps sombrely furnished, 
would be ridiculous in the extreme if transported to the 
pretty little white-and-gold sanctum that my lady reserves 
for herself. 




Suggestion for a Living Room. 

Have the fire-place lined with tiles of good design; put 
in a useful and artistic iron grate, or, if j ou prefer it, 
with front of bronze or brass. Dog grates are much less 
expensive than formerly, and are eminently satisfactory. 
Have a simple-designed fender, say about two feet high, 
made of plain wrought iron bars and filled in with pierced 
brass work. Be contented with plain fire-irons. They 
are sure to be in good taste, a claim to which most of the 
elaborate ones may not pretend. 
* * * 

Cherry makes a handsome floor and does much towards 
furnishing a room. Cherry flooring, like oak, should not 
be sawed into too narrow strips; two-inch strips are 
narrow enough. Being a wood of fine grain, cherry is 
susceptible of a high polish, but darkens rapidly from sun- 
light and heat. Never use oil on cherry floors, as it 
rapidly hastens this process of growing darker and gives 
cherry a brownish hue. 

The greatest objection to a cherry floor is its cost. In 
most localities cherry suitable for flooring and properly 
kiln dried costs one hundred and thirty dollars per thou- 
sand feet, and is difficult to obtain at that. Cherry floors 
show dust and mar easily; it is impossible for any one with 
a coarsely made shoe to walk across them without denting 
them. The floor should be laid with great care, for there 
will soon be spaces between the boards unless the lumber 
is well dried. 

We consider scientific testimony to be of the first importance, but we also 
have letters from ladies all over the land tel line of the merits of Creme de 
Lis for the complexion. It is harmless and eventually "creates a perfect 
complexion." 



COUGHS 

Bronchitis, HoAfscnes*, 

Sore Throat 
Effectively Relieved. 



Bronchial 



John I. Itr.-tr,, 



THE CALIFORNIA HOTEL. Dinner.-Sunday, Jan. 2b, 1900. 

Grape Fruit mi I{i<in, 

Roop. — Groan Turtle a I'Amariaaln ima Royale. 

Hon* D'(ErvRM.~ Celery on Branohe; siuflVd Mangoes; Soil Horrlns Roc 

on Pout; Ripe OH 
I'mii.— Boiled Turcot, Simee VaJoialonno; Broiled stripe 1 Bsm ■ li Oolbonr; 

Pommel < Ihatoau. 

Bmokod Bool Tongue* Plokled Walnut B 
BAtwdb.— Lobsiei a laNewbereen Cniaae; Calf's s« setbreai 

mix Poll! Pols; Larded Pllel ot Beel a la Plnani GEui n In Pfotffo, 

Roast,— PriniL- Ribs of Baal au Railord; Suckling Pig with Pried Apples; 

BtaffM Turkey, Cranberry Sauce, pouch— Sorbet au Chartreuse. 
Vbgetables.— String Beans a I'Anfflaise : Browned Sweat, Boiled and 

Mn-nhed Potatoes ; Boiled Rice ; Stewed Tomatoes : AsparaguH, SauOC 

Btollandaise. 

Cold Meats— Roast Beef; Saddle of Lamb; Pate of Chicken en Croutc: 
TTam Glace. 

Salads.— Lettuce: Chicory: Roinaine; AValdorf. 

Dessert. — Plum Pudding, Hard and Brandy Sauce: Pumpkin Pie; Rh 11 bach 
Pic; Champagne Jelly: Tutti Fruttl Ice Cream; Assorted Nuts; Cluster 
Raisins; Assorted Cakes : Amerioan, Cream, Edam, and Roouefort 
Cheese: Fruit in Season; Smyrna Figs; Tea and Coffee. 

Dishes not on this menu can be ordered at restaurant prioes. Dinner 6 to h p.m 
R. H. Wabfihld Sc Co., Proprietors. 



Joseph Oillott's Steel Pens, THB AWA ^i£ 



CHICAGO, 1893 

Gold Medals Paris, 1878-1809. These pens are "the 
best in the world." Sole agent for the United States. 
Mr. Henry Hob, 91 John street. New York. 
Sold by all stationers. 



The Drummers' Inn 

10(5 Sansome street, San Francisco. 

Robt. D. Hagerty, proprietor 



Frank Carr. 

The Manhattan Cafe 



Telephone Main 5611. 



25 Geary Street. 

Ladies' Cafe and Wine Rooms, 25 Brook Place, S. P. 

Samuel M. Shortridge, Atty-at-Law 

Crocker Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

Worthingtpn Ames 

nember Stock and Bond Exchange 

Broker in Stocks, Bonds, and Municipal Securities 

Safe Deposit Building, 324 Montgomery street. Telephone Main 1381 



ASSESSMENT NOTICE. 
Alta Silver Mining Company. 

Location of principal place of business— San Francisco, Cal. Location of 
works— Gold Hill, Storey county, Nevada. 

Notice is hereby given that at a meeting; of the Board of Directors, held 
on the 22d day of January, 1900, an assessment, (No. 64) of five (5c.) cents per 
share was levied upon the capital stock of the corporation, payable im- 
mediately in United States gold coin, to the secretary, at the office of the 
company, room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

Any stock upon which this assessment shall remain unpaid on 

THE 26th DAY OF FEBRUARY. 1900, 
will be delinquent, and advertised for sale at public auction, and unloss pay- 
ment is made before, will be sold on MONDAY, the 19th day of March, 
1900, to pay the delinquent assessment, together with the costs of advertis- 
ing and expenses of sale. By order of the Board of Directors. 

J. E. JACOBUS, Secretary. 
Office— Room 33, Nevada Block, 309 Montgomery street, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. _____ 

Tomkinson's Livery 

RUBBER TIRES. 
CUT RATES FOR STRANGERS. 

Established 1862. Tel. Main 153. 

Nos. 67-59-61 Minna street, between First 
and Second. One block from Palace Hotel, 
Carriages and coupes at Pacific Union Club. 
corner Post and Stockton streets. 

J. TOMK1NSON, Proprietor. 




Southern Pacific Co.--Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are due to arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 

[Main Line, Foot of Market Street] 



leave] 



From December 15, 1899 



[arrive 



•7:00 A Benicia, Suisun, Elmira, Vacaville, Rumsey, and Sacramento.. ■7 

*7:00a Shasta Express—Davis, Willows, Red Bluff, Portland ''~ 

*7:30a Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Calistoga, Santa Rosa *6 

*8:30A The Overland Limited— Ogden, Denver, Omaha. Chicago '5: 

*8:30A San Jose, Livermore, Stockton, lone, Sacramento. PlaoerviUe, 

Marysville, Chico, Red Bluff. *4 

*8:30 a **Milton, Oakdale, and Sonora *4 

*9:00 A Hay wards, Niles, and way stations ''ll: 

•9:00a Davis, Woodland, Knights Landing, Marysville, Oroville *7 

.*9:00A Atlantic Express, Ogden and East "9 

*9:00 A Martinez, Tracy, Lathrop, Stockton, Merced and Fresno "12: 

*9:00 a Port Costa, Fresno, Moiave and Los Angeles '0: 

*10:00 a Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations *6l 

*11:00a Hay wards, Niles, and way stations *2i 

*12:00m Niles, Livermore, Stockton, Sacramento, Mendota, Hanford, 

Visalia.Porterville *4; 

tl:00 p Sacramento River Steamers T8: 

*3:00 p Haywards, Niles and way stations *5; 

*4:00 P Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Calistoga, Santa Rosa *9: 

*'4:00p Benicia, Vacaville, Sacramento, Woodland, Knight's Landing 

Marysville, Oroville "10: 

*4:30p Niles. San Jose, and Stockton *7 

*5;00p The Owl Limited. Tracy, Fresno, Bakersfield, Saiigua for 

Santa Barbara, Los Angeles , .... 10; 

05:00 p Sunset Limited— El Paso, New Orleans and East '10 

*5:30p Stockton, Merced, Fresno *12; 

*5:.30 p Fresno, Bakersfield, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Deming, El 

Paso, New Orleans, and East *s 

*5:30p Santa Fe Route, Atlantic Express, for Mojave and East *6 

*6:00 p Haywards, Niles, and San Jose "7 

+6:30 P Vallejo *12 

*6:30p Oriental Mail— Ogden and East : "8 

l7:(X)p Vallejo, Port Costa, and way stations J9 

'SiOSp Oregon and California Express, Sacramento, Marysville, Red- 
ding, Portland Puget Sound and East *8 



45 P 
45 p 
:15 P 

15 P 

15 P 
L5 p 
45 A 
:45P 
15 A 
15 P 
■15 P 
45 P 
■15 P 

:15 P 
00 p 
■15 p 
15 A 

45 A 
:I5 P 

:45 A 
:45 a 

:15 p 

:45 A 
:45 p 
45 A 
:15 p 
:50 p 
:55 p 

:15 a 



Coast DrvrsiON (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 



*8:15a Newark, Centerville, San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruzand way stations *5:50 p 

f2:15p Newark, Centerville, San Jose, New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations tl0:50 a 

*4:15p Newark, San Jose, Los Gatos *9:20 a 

611:45 p Hunters' Excursion, San Jose and way stations 17:20 p 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 
From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— "^ilS. 9:00. and 11:00 
A. M., Jl:00. *2:00, 13:00, *4:00. 15:00 and*6:00 P. M. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway— *6;00, 8:00, 10:00 A. m.; Jl2;00, *1:00 
J2:00, *3 :00, U :00. *5 :00 P. M. 

Coast Division (Broad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets). 

+6:10 A Ocean View, South San Francisco +6:30 P 

*7:00a San Jose and way stations (New Almaden Wednesday only) *1:30 P 

*9:00a San Jose, TresPinos, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove. Paso Rohles, 

San Luis Obispo, Surf, Lompoc, and principal way stations *4:10 p 

•■10:40 A San Jose and way stations *B:85 a 

*11:30 a San Jose and way stations *5:30 p 

t2 :45 p San Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park, Palo Alto, Santa Clara, San 
Jose.Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz. Salinas, Monterey, and Pacific 

Grove +10:36 A 

3:30p San Jose and Way Stations *7 

4:15p San Jose and Principal Way Stations *9 



5:30 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations *8 

*6:30p San Jose and Way Stations +8 

6ll:45p San Jose and Way Stations *7 



:30 p 

:45 a 

:00 a 

:35 a 

:00 a 



A for Morning. P for Afternoon. 

t Sundays only. 
a Tuesdays and Fridays. 



'Daily. + Sundays excepted. 

b Saturdays only. 

C Thursdays and Sundays. 



The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and other 
information. 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 




Steamers leave Broadway 
Wharf. San Francisco. 

For Alaskan ports, 10 a.m.. Ian. 1,6, 11,16,21,26,31; Feb. 5 
change to company's steamers at Seattle. 

ForB. C. and Puget Sound Ports, 10 a. h„ Jan. 1,6, 11, 16, 
21. 26, 31 : Feb. 5, and every fifth day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay) 2 p.m., Jan. 4,9,14,19,21, 
29 ; Feb. 3, and every fifth day thereafter. 
For Newport (Los Angeles) and way ports, 9 A. m. Jan. 
3,l7,'ll,;i5. 19. 23727, 31; Feb. 4, and every fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford, Santa Barbara, Port Los 
Angeles, Redondo, (Los Angeles) 11 a. m., Jan, 1,5,9,13,17,21,25,29; Feb. 2, 
and every fourth day thereafter. 

For Mexican ports, 10 A m„ 7th of each month. 
| For further information obtain company's folder. 

""Tile company reserves the right to change steamers, sailing dates, and 
hours of sailing without previous notice. 

TICKET OFFICE— No. 4 New Montgomery street. (Palace Hotel.) 

G00DALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen.Agts., 10 Market St., San Francisco 




SS ' 

ss* 



Australia," Wednesday. Feb. 7, 1900, : 
Alameda," Wednesday, Feb. 21, at 8 p. ni. 



Line to Coolgardie, Australia, and Capetown.South 
Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS 00 
Agents, 114 Montgomery St. Freight office, 327 
Market St., San Francisco. 



WeakfMen and Women 



Should use Damlana Bitters, 
the great Mexican remedy; 

it gives health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at 323 Market 

street. San Francisco. Send for circular. 



California Northwestern R'y Co. 

LESSEE 

San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tiboron Ferry— Foot of Market Street 
WEEK DAYS— 7:30, 9:00, 11:00 a. m; 12:35, 3:30. 5:10, 6:30 P. M. Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11:30 p.m. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1:50 and 11:30 P. m. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A. M.; 1:30, 3:30. 5:00, 6:20 p. M. 
SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:10.7:50,9:20,11:10 A. M.; 12:45, 3:40, 5:10 P. M. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1 :55 and 6 :35 P. M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:10. 9:40. 11:10 a.m.; 1:40, 3:40. 5:05, 6:25 p. M. 

Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave San Francisco 



Week days | Sundays 



In Effect Oct. 15, 1899 



Destinations 



Arrive in San Francisco 
Sundays I Week dayB 



7:30 am 
3:30 pm 
5:10 pm 



8:00 am 
9:30 am 
5:00 pm 



Novato 
Petal uma 
Santa Rosa 



10:40 am 
6;05 pm 
7:35 pm 



' AM 
> PM 



Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdsburg, Lytton, 

Geyserville, Cloverdale 



8:40 AM 
10:25 AM 
_ 6:22_pm 

10:25 am 
6:22 pm 



7:30 am I 


8:00 am I 


Hopland, Ukiah 


I 7:35 pm 


| 6:22 PM 


7:30 am 1 
3:30 pm 1 


8:00 am | 


Guerneville 


1 7:35 pm 


1 10:25 am 
1 6:22 PM 


7:30 am 1 
5:10 PM I 


8:00 am 1 
5:00 pm | 


Sonoma 
Glen Ellen 


I 10:40 AM 
1 6:05 pm 


1 8:40 AM 
1 6:22 pm 


7:30 am 1 
3:30 pm 1 


8:00 AM j 
5:00 pm I 


Sebastopol 


| 10:40 am 
| 7:35 pm 


1 10:25 AM 
I 6:22 pm 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs and White Sulphur 
Springs: at Lytton for Lytton Springs; at Geyserville for Skaggs* Springs; at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers; at Hopland for Duncan Springs, Highland Springs 
Kelseyville, Carlsbad Springs, Soda Bay, Lakeport, and Bartlett Springs; at 
Ukiah, for Vichs' Springs, Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake, 
Witter Springs, Upper Lake, Porno, Potter Valley, John Day's, Riverside, 
Lierley's, Bucknell's, Sanhedrin Heights, Hullville, Booneville, Philo. 
Christine Soda Springs, Navarro, Whitesboro, Albion, Little River, Orr's 
Springs, Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, Westport, Usal Willits, Laytonville, 
Cummings, Bell's Springs. Harris, Olsen's, Dyer, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 
TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 

H. C. WHITING. Gen. Manager. R. X. RYAN. Gen. Pass. Agent. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 

Steamers leave wharf. FIRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p. m., for 

YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG, 

calling at Kobe (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hongkong 
with steamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Doric (via Honolulu) Thursday, February 1, 1900 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Tuesday, February 27. 1900 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Friday, March 23, 1900 

Doric (via Honolulu) Tuesday, April 17, 1900 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street 
corner First. D. D. STUBBS, General Manager. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 

San Francisco. December 29, 1899. 
At a regular meeting of the Board of Directors of this society, held 
this day, a dividend has been declared at the rate of three and one-qunrter 
(SJO per cent per annum on all deposits for the six months ending Decem- 
ber 31, 1899, free from all taxes and payable on and after January 1, 1900. 

ROBERT J. TOB1N, Secretary. 
Office : Corner Market, McAllister and Jones streets, San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Continental Building and Loan Association of California. 

The Continental Building and Loan Association of California has declined 
for the Pix months ending December 81, 1889, a dividend of 12 per cent per 
annum to class "A" stock. 10 per cent per annum to Class "F" stock, i'> per 
cent per annum on Term Deposits, and 5 per cent per annum on Ordinary 
Deposits. 

Capt. Oliver Ei.dridge. President. William Corbin, Secretary. 

Office: 222 Sansome street. San Francisco, Oal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco. 
For the half year ending December 31, 1899, a dividend has been declared 
at the rate of three (3) per cent per annum on all deposits, free of taxes, pay- 
able on and after Tuesday, January 2. 1900. 

GEO. A. STORY, Cashier. 
Office: 33 Post street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Savings and Loan Society. 
The Board of Directors declared a dividend for the term ending December 
31, 1899, at the rate of three and sixty one-hundredths (3 60) per cent per an- 
num on Term Deposits, and three (8) per cent per annum on I trdinara ' '*-'- 
posits. free of taxes, and payable on and utter January 2, 1900. Dividends 
not called for are added and to bear the same rate of dividend as the principal 
from and after January 1, 1900. 

CYBTJS W. CARMANY. Cashier. 
Office: 101 Montgomery street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

For the half year ending with the 31st of December, L899, a dividend ha 

been declared at the rate per annum of three and three-fourths (3 ;! ( ) pe 

cent, on term deposits, and three and one-eighth (sVe) per cent, on ordinary 

deposits, free of taxes, payable on and after Tuesday. January 2, 1900. 

LOVEIX WRITE. Cashier. 
Office: 532 California street, corner Webb, San Francisco, Cal. 



/Yfe» fr »(•* IS <wn£f. 



ESTABLISHED JULY 20. 1856 



vlnn< 








Ko/. ZX 



S^tf FRANCISCO, FEBRUARY 3 t 1900. 



Number 5. 



Printed andpuhllshedcverySalurday by the proprietor, FREO MARRIOTT 
6H Kearny street. San FimDdBOO. Entered at San Francisco Post- 
oflice as Second-class Mutter. 

Tho office o! the NEWS LETTER in New York Oily is at 331 Park Row 
Bldg„(Fred A. Marriott Eastern Representative*, where Information 
may bo obtained regarding subscription and advertising rates. 

All aocial items, announcements, advertising, or other matter, intended for 
publication in the current number of the NEWS LETTER, should be 
sent to this office not later than six o'clock Thursday afternoon. 







NE of the evils of the use of cigarettes is that good 
young men write essays about it. 

S^ORDING to reports from the Boers their prin- 
cipal suffering thus far has been caused by ennui. 

SNOT/HER General has been added to the already long 
list who, having marched uphill, marched down again, 
with speed perhaps accelerated. 

IP the English really lack a military leader, attention is 
called to the fact that Harrison Gray Otis has not 
crossed a Rubicon for some time. 



" 'TNHE Iron Tooth" of the Kaiser was pulled off the 
1 stage at the eleventh hour, but grim death was 
the only agency potent enough to accomplish this. 

THE only way for Kentucky to get into the good graces 
of the public again is to hang Colseu in spite of the 
fact that he is a Colonel. There would be colonels left. 



IT is to be observed with regret that the "Union Mission 
Army" remains outside the jail. This army is consti- 
tuted of a rogue named Moore, a swindler and scoundrel 
repeatedly exposed. But the new police broom is being 
worn to a stub in Chinatown. 



SCCC-RDING to Benjamin Ide Wheeler the United 
States has a great mission to perform in preventing 
the partition of China. But the United States is learning 
a glorious lesson in the somewhat neglected art of minding 
its own business. 

BY an ordinance of Kenosha, Wis., habitual drunkards 
are to have their pictures posted in saloons, thus add- 
ing to the horrors of theso places of sin. The chances are 
that the ordinance will no more hold water than would one 
of the gentlemen destined for its new style rogues' gal- 
lery. 

Jl TWO-YEAR old child of Council Bluffs has been 
ii taught to read and is going into her third year and 
the classics together. A postscript to the story telling 
by what method her parents have escaped the asylum 
would be read with interest. 



IT is refreshing, in these matter of fact prosaic days, to 
learn that the real live bloodthirsty mutiny of romance is 
still a possibility. The tale of the Brigantine Ethel and 
her murderous crew, which comes from Australia, pro- 
vides a theme of horror which Clark Russell would do well 
to utilize. 

THAT the bacillus of tuberculosis may be met at the 
border of the State and turned back by shot-gun 
tactics, is a wild and impossible theory and yet the at- 
tempted formulation of the plan shows that thought is be- 
ing directed to a very serious problem. Doubtless much 
may be done by intelligent, scientific methods to check 
this plague of civilization. Certainly to prevent the 
schools from being breeding places for it is within possi- 
bilities, while more may be accomplished by teaching 
sanitary methods and correct ways of living. , 



THREE women claim the body and effects of stevedore 
Johnson, who fell the other day into a deep and rug- 
ged hold, to bis fatal breakage. Each of the trio asserts 
that she is the widow. Perhaps if Johnson were permitted 
to look down at the weeping trio his spirit would experi- 
ence the pleasing emotion of resignation. 

SN ambassador cannot "meet" in a social way any per- 
son of inferior rank. So it happened that a lot of 
ambassadors, who despite their titles are commonly reck- 
oned as gentlemen, refused to accept an invitation to 
"meet" Admiral Dewey. It is too bad that a silly and 
childish custom can prevent the exercise of politeness. 



SN anti-English meeting at Philadelphia severely ar- 
raigned the British for the famine in India, being of 
the mind, apparently, that the lack of rain was due to a 
three-sided compaot to which the Queen, Joe Chamberlain, 
and Providence are parties. How much intelligence hap- 
pens to be at large in the land where asylums abound has 
not been explained. 

THE beleaguered garrison at Ladysmith have hit upon 
a novel method of whiling away the tedium of the 
siege. They have brought out a highly original news- 
paper, entitled the Ladysmith Lyre, the peculiar feature 
of which is that all the news contained in it is admittedly 
false. The Editor's proud boast is that he spares no 
effort in the collection and preparation of falsehood. And 
in case any true statement should by accident creep in, he 
has set apart a special column for such items. Up to the 
present this space has remained blank. Some San Fran- 
cisco dailies might with advantage follow the Ladysmith 
example. 

THE glamor of superstition which always envelops poor 
pussy will not be lessened by the remarkable dis- 
covery at Marin County Jail. The ghastly, up-to-date, 
chain^clanking spectre which has long patrolled this un- 
desirable place of abode has turned out to be only the cat 
hunting mice. Yet the fact that this remarkable creature 
is responsible for the two suicides and several insanities 
furnishes us with a striking illustration of the power which 
the supernatural has over the human mind. Her first 
owner, a Chinaman, committed suicide, the next occupant 
of the cell followed suit and several other prisoners were 
driven out of their minds by the apparition. This pheno- 
menal cat must surely have a conscience, for by way of 
amends, she actually saved a woman from burning to 
death the other day. 

SK. GRIM, recorder of Alameda County, has returned 
a from an Eastern trip reimpressed with the fact that 
Oakland has wonderful advantages as a manufacturing 
city. "We saw," said Mr. Grim, "no place that has the 
natural advantages that Oakland has for becoming a 
great manufacturing center and I am fully convinced that 
with a proper display of energy and proper action of our 
officials proper inducements could be held out to those in- 
terested that would result in Oakland's becoming a manu- 
facturing city of no mean importance. In all manufactur- 
ing cities the factories all seek locations on the lines of the 
railroads and as the natural advantages are all there, 
Sixteenth street depot should be surrounded with the fac- 
tories in the near future. One thing that impressed me 
was that we saw no evidence of idle men, which was some- 
thing of a contrast with the conditions of this coast. This 
I attributed to manufacturing." 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 3, igoo. 



HAS THE LEGISLATURE ABDICATED ITS FUNCTIONS! 

IF we are to believe the daily press, California's present 
Legislature is alike powerless for evil and impotent for 
good. It can, in point of fact, do nothing until a couple of 
newspaper proprietors give it permission. Elected more 
than a year ago its first and most imperative duty was to 
elect a Senator to represent the interests of the State in 
the Councils of the Nation. Never has there been a time 
when the Pacific Coast needed its whole political strength 
in Washington more than it does now. Questions of the 
very highest moment to the future of this Western out- 
post of trade expansion are being passed upon whilst 
California's voice is only half heard. In legislating for our 
new possessions in this ocean, our State ought to be at 
the very fore-front, putting in its best endeavors. The 
whole country is looking to the developments now going 
on in the Pacific with eyes of great expectation. At such 
a time it is monstrous and wrong that California should be 
maimed and wounded in the house of her friends. It is her 
own Legislators, be it remembered, and not her enemies, 
if she has any, who have done this thing. A three months' 
session was wasted a year ago in an abortive effort on the 
part of the Legislature to do its duty. The Governor, in 
the exercise of a wise discretion, has called the people's 
representatives together again in extra session, in the 
hope and expectation that they are at last ready to get 
down to business and do that for which they were elected. 
Yet we are told at the end of a week's trial that there 
is no more hope of the "dead-lock" being broken than 
there was at any previous time, and all this only because 
two would-be Senators own newspapers and will that it 
should be so. But there is a higher will than theirs in the 
State, to which Legislators would do well to bow. The 
people are sick and tired of the unceasing attacks upon 
the one man who can be elected. It is time that members 
showed some respect for their own manhood, and asserted 
their independence. Let them go ahead and do their duty, 
as they have light to see it, and the people will sustain 
them. That the Republican majority would have long ago 
chosen Col. D. M. Burns, if left to their natural choice, is 
without a doubt. He is, and for six years past has been, 
the leader of the party : .n the State. By matchless ability 
he has out-classed monied rivals, organized success for his 
party, taken California out of the doubtful column, and is 
holding it to-day safe for greater triumphs still. This man 
the rank and file know and believe in, and follow. To dis- 
parage him is to belittle the whole party that has so often 
accepted his lead. The very men who in their newspapers 
are doing the disparaging, affected his company, courted 
his smiles, and sought his aid, until he showed signs of 
making the victory his own and not theirs. That is the 
head and front of his offending. He thinks the Senatorial 
toga will fit his shoulders better than those of the other 
fellows, and he is right. They have not yet grown to 
Senatorial stature, and he has. That is what 's the matter. 



CHURCH PROPERTY IN THE PHILIPPINES. 

WASHINGTON dispatches tell us that the Adminis- 
tration is being greatly embarrassed by the clergy 
in both Porto Rico and the Philippines in regard to what 
they deem to be church property. The Call's special 
says that there is "no desire on the part of officials to 
take any action which may be offensive to the Catholic 
voters of the country. No instructions have been given 
to either General Otis or General Davis relative to the 
disposition to be made of the property claimed by the 
church, and none will be for the present at least." At 
the time the Paris treaty was up for ratification, the 
News Letter pointed out the magnitude of the interests 
involved in this matter of church property. As a question 
of fact, all the lands in the Philippines worth having are 
covered by Spanish grants in favor of the different relig- 
ious orders. For the twenty millions our Government 
paid Spain we get nothing but swamps, mountains, and 
ten millions of rebels. The land that grows rice, corn, 
hemp, tobacco, etc., is nearly all owned by the Friars, to 
whom the Filipinos have long been compelled to pay rent 
in the shape of a tax that the State has enforced. The 
archives ot the country under Spanish rule have always 
been most carefully kept, and no question can arise as to 
who is the legal and duly recorded owner of any given 



plot of ground. Now come the Friars, who demand, not 
only that their ownership shall be recognized, but that 
our Government shall collect their rents as the Spanish 
Governors were accustomed to do. They insist that they 
are entitled to this by virtue of the terms of the treaty of 
Paris. That document recognizes existing titles and con- 
tracts, and guarantees their inviolability, which it ought 
never to have done. Its doing so was a colossal blunder, 
for which it will be next to impossible for the Administra- 
tion to find a remedy. We cannot, without an unparalleled 
breach of faith, seize the church lands, and if we cannot, 
of what use are the Philippines? The Administration sees 
that the question is likely to get into our home politics, 
where it is liable to stir up religious strife and give a 
world of trouble. The press dispatches further tell us 
that "President McKinley has determined to leave to a 
new Philippine Commission the question of the disposition 
of the church property in the far Eastern Archipelago." 
But that will not do; the matter must be faced by both 
the President and Congress. If we have got to protect 
the Friars in the occupation of all the lands they claim, it 
would be better, even yet, to leave the country to the 
Filipinos. 

"A DAMNABLE WAR" WERE THE WORDS OF GENERAL 
LAWTON. 

THAT General Lawton, in addition to being the bravest 
of the brave, was a high minded and patriotic man, 
everybody now knows. It is perfectly well understood, 
that although he did his duty as the gallant soldier he was, 
he yet thought that the war upon the Filipinos could and 
ought to have been avoided. He liked the Philippines and 
their people, and intended, had he lived, to take up his 
residence among them when the war was over. Major 
Louis L. Seaman, a well known physician of New York 
City, pays tribute to Lawton in an article which appears 
in Leslie's Weekly. Major Seaman served both in Cuba 
and the Philippines. He writes: "General Lawton was 
one of the dearest friends I had. He was set against the 
war upon the Filipinos. I heard his famous expression char- 
acterizing it as 'a damnable war.' Nevertheless he was 
true to his duty. He realized that it was not his to reason 
why, and he always met the first requisite of a soldier, 
which is to obey orders." That is competent and reliable 
testimony, and is in keeping with that of all who were 
close to the Knightly Lawton. 



TO BOOM OUR PACIFIC OCEAN TRADE. 

THE Merchant's Association, in the furtherance of our 
Pacific Ocean trade, propose to establish in San 
Francisco a museum like unto that which has been so 
successful in Philadelphia. All kinds of manufactures and 
products are to be put upon exhibition, for the benefit of 
the strangers who may visit us for the purposes of trade. 
As such displays elsewhere have helped to expand com- 
merce, there is every reason to suppose that a similar 
enterprise here would have a like effect. San Francisco 
is a resting place for globe trotters from all over the 
world. In few other cities could a permanent exposition 
be maintained that would be so good an advertisement as 
the one proposed to be established here. It would be 
visited by people from everywhere. The Merchant's As- 
sociation is doing well in endeavoring to prepare San 
Francisco for the destiny that awaits her in the well-nigh 
boundless opportunities that will come to her through the 
opening up of the Orient. The Association is on the right 
track, and may be depended upon not to grow weary in 
well doing. All our commercial and industrial organiza- 
tions would do well to warm up the subject of expanding 
our trade with the countries that surround the broad 
Pacific. In that direction our great future lies. The 
Pacific Ocean is, in a very special sense, our ocean. We 
have a sort of pre-emptive right to it; by reason of our 
early occupation, central situation, and pioneer work. 
Our steam lines are already traversing it in almost every 
direction. They will multiply in number astonishingly; for 
steamers are the commerce winners of the day. 

In extension of the museum idea, we venture the sug- 
gestion that, while it is good to have customers come to 
our exposition, it would be still better to send smaller ex- 
positions to them. Some four or five years ago the 



February 3, 1900. 



s\v i itii: 



Australian Colonies made a tremendous hit hv spnding a 
display of about all thpy have to .• rnpn 

were sent along. The host building that was to be hat! for 
money was made attractive by exterior as well as interior 
i)erornt : on«. A grand barquet was given which was at- 
tended bv members of the Japanese parliament, and 
cabinet ministers. Everything eaten or drank on the oc- 
casion was of Australian production. Within six mnnths 
thereafter, such a trade had sprung up between the 
Colonies and Japan that it was found necessary to estab- 
lish a regular line of steamers in order to accommodate 
the business, which has grown and is still growing rapidly. 
The railroad's plan of sending exhibition cars over the 
tracks in this country was an excellent one. Why not 
send like cars over the many miles of railroad in such 
countries as Japan, India, Australia and New Zealand? 
These are davs of activity and keen competition, when 
States, as well as individuals, must advertise or go to the 
wall. 

THE OPENING OF PARLIAMENT. 

TX the midst of a crises more acute thaD any Great 
Britain has experienced since the Sepoy mutiny, its 
Parliament is listless and lifeless to a degree. There is, 
however, cause for this. The national mind is in no mood 
to listen to parliamentary eloquence. Thought is concen- 
trated on South Africa and not on Westminster. The all- 
absorbing dutv of the hour calls for fighting, not talking. 
The whole Empire is content not to swap horses whilst 
crossing a dangerous stream that confronts it, and is 
supporting the government to a man. That mistakes have 
been made they know, but this is not the time to indulge 
in recriminations on that head. For the present there- 
fore there is a union of all parties. Ordinarily it is the 
function of an opposition to oppose, but with the prestige 
and safety of the Empire in peril there is no room for 
party dissensions and the people would tolerate none. 
This the front benches of the opposition party in the 
House of Commons plainly realize. Almost for the first 
time in recent historv that House finds itself bereft of its 
talking functions. The duties that are now paramount 
have to be worked out in the administrative departments, 
and not in the halls of legislation. It is entirely to the 
credit of the British people that at such a time as this 
they can compose their souls in peace, and, without turn- 
ing to the right hand or to the left, bend all their energies 
to the accomolishmgof the main purpose. In this attitude 
the'r force, solidity, and strength of character is plainly 
discernible. By reason of possessing those qualities they 
will now as ever emerge safely from out of all their 
tribulations. 

OUR SAMOAN RESPONSIBILITIES. 

THINGS look promising for a rebellion in Samoa. 
Malietoa Tanu, the young King who never reigned, 
has taken the floor in protest against the recent partition 
of the Islands between Germany and the United States. 
He has a certain amount of justice on his side, because 
the Samoans were not consulted about the division of their 
land between two foreign nations. Furthermore the 
Germans have always been unpopular in Samoa, mainly 
because of the brutal mannerin which the plantation over- 
seers treated the black laborers imported from other 
isles. The Samoans have persistently refused to work on 
the German plantations, though they have ever been 
readv to steal from them. The Germans have sought to 
retaliate and hence there has always been more or less 
friction between the two races. The black boys, brought 
to Samoa at great expense by the Germans, have com- 
manded the keenest sympathy from the Samoans, who are 
a nation of liberty lovers, consistently hating all forms of 
tyranny and oppression. The one dread of the Samoans 
has been that the Germans would take the Islands, and 
force them to labor on the plantations. Now that their 
fear has been realized trouble is not at all improbable. 
Malietoa Tanu with a United Samoa behind him would 
prove a hard nut for the Germans to crack. The interior 
of Samoa, like the Transvaal, is a mass of precipitous 
mountains, traversed only by narrow and difficult paths. 
It would be impossible to manoeuvre any large body of 
troops amid these fastnesses, though the natives are 
thoroughly at home in them, and could maintain a guerilla 



w»r for an indefinite l>eing 

commanded by the guns of the men-of-war won 

ind the natives would take up tbell 
denop in thp bush, whenrr- thrv could raid the plant .r 
at their lpisurp. Thus the war might be prolongptl for 
. without any substantial advantage being gained by 
either side. Tf this were Germany's business only we need 
not concern ourselves, but unfortunately Uncle Sam, being 
a partner to the deal, cannot escape responsibility. The 
rebellion is bound to spread to Tutuila, for the Samoan 
people are practically one great family. If the Germans, 
bv over harsh treatment of the natives, precipitate a 
revolt, we will have to aid in its suppression, or else con- 
sent to abandon our newly acquired Islands, with its in- 
valuable coaling station. 



WHEN WILL THE BONDS FOR PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS 
ISSUE? 

THERE was a paragraph in Mayor Phelan's inaugural 
that seems to have escaped the attention of the lynx- 
eyed dailies. It appears that the bonds for municipal 
Improvements, if issued now, would be liable to State tax- 
ation. Of course San Francisco does not want to be made 
an exception to the general rule that municipal property 
is not taxable by the State. The Mayor therefore indi- 
cated that the issuance of the proposed bonds might be 
"deferred" until after the Legislature could be appealed 
to to amend the law. Of course, he did not then know 
that Governor Gage intended to call an extra session; 
otherwise he could, without much doubt, have succeeded 
in inducing the Governor to include this matter in his pro- 
clamation. As it was not so included it looks as if we 
must wait another year before the necessary legislation 
can be had. The question arises: Ought the issuance of 
sufficient of the bonds to go on with to be postponed on 
that account? If the city were to pay the tax for a year 
the Legislature could surely be depended upon to refund 
the amount. At any rate, enough money ought to be 
raised at once to enable certain of the more needed im- 
provements to be started without further delay. The 
New City and County Hospital, for instance, is a crying 
necessity that has already been allowed to remain too 
long in abeyance. The site is city property, the plans 
have been prepared and adopted, and bids for the work 
ought not to be delayed one unnecessary hour. We notice 
that Supervisor Wesley Reed proposes that the decision 
of the Supreme Court be taken as to the legality of the 
bonds before they are issued. If that be deemed necessary 
by the city's law advisers, it is to be devoutly hoped that- 
some way will be found to get a prompt hearing and 
judgment from the appellate court. It will not do to 
dilly-dally and waste time over starting the proposed im- 
provements. Any difficulties that may be in the way can 
be and must be overcome. 



PENSION CLAIMS POURING IN. 

THE rate at which pension claims are pouring in on ac- 
count of our little war with ' Spain is appalling even 
the Administration. They already foot up some twenty- 
five thousand and the end is not in sight. In the single 
battle of San Juan Hill there were twenty-three regiments 
and three batteries of the regular army employed. Of 
these troops 192 were killed, 1,097 were wounded, and 55 
were reported missing. The claims for pensions filed by 
the regulars thus engaged a'ready number 2,962. Nine 
regiments of volunteers took oartin the same engagement. 
Their losses were 34 killed, 177 wounded and 45 missing. 
The pension claims from these troops already amount to 
3,558. A New York regiment that reported no killed, 
wounded, or missing at all, has sent in 419 claims for 
pensions. If all these claims have rightpously arisen out 
of one battle, what will the whole bill amount to by the 
time we have conquered the Philippines? There is reason, 
however, why the claims arising from this war should 
seem out of proportion to the number killed and wounded. 
The deadly tropics have no doubt wrecked the health of 
all too many of our brave boys. Whilst there should be 
the largest generosity in dealing with such cases, there 
should be great circumspection used in weeding out the 
unworthy ones. The people will have to foot the bill and 
they have a right to insist that it shall be an honest one. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 3, 1^00. 



GREAT BRITAIN'S MILITARY RESOURCES. 

WHILST everyone knows that Great Britain has a navy 
that is equal to almost any possible combination that 
can be formed against it, the facts are little understood 
as to what her military strength is. It will be interesting 
at this juncture to get at those facts. The regular army 
of enlisted men numbers 171,400. These are thoroughly 
drilled and equipped soldiers, ready for any service at a 
moment's notice. In times of peace the maj >rity of the 
regiments of the line are scattered throughout Britain's 
broad domain, and it takes no small effort to gather them 
together in case of need. The promptitude, however, with 
which a large army was gotteu into South Africa demon- 
strates that England's transport service is equal to any 
emergency. The fighting that has been done, though un- 
successful, has shown that the British soldier is still the 
same determined, dogged, brave combatant that he ever 
was. The time of service in the British Army has been 
greatly shortened during recent years, and in this there 
is a well-understood policy. It is said that at the end of 
three years' experience in a regiment a man is as good a 
soldier as he ever will be. There is, therefore, no further 
use in detaining in times of peace. In England be is mus- 
tered out, but not discarded. He becomes what is called 
"a reservist." He still continues to draw a certain amount 
of pay. When the recent South African war broke out 
nearly all these men had reported for service before they 
were regularly called out. They number 83,000. The 
militia consists of men in various employments who enlist 
for any kind of service, home or foreign, and are under 
compulsion — as the volunteer is not — to go wherever they 
are sent. Of these men a higher degree of skill is required 
than is expected of the volunteers, and every summer they 
are put through a month or more of the hardest kind of 
training, receiving full pay for their time, and being under 
army law for the period. They number about 132,500. 

Then come the volunteers, who receive about the same 
drill and general treatment that our own State militia 
does. Tbey are not required to go on foreign service, un- 
less they choose, but they have almost to a man chosen to 
go to South Africa, and many of them are now on their 
way there. The yeomanry, of whom 10,000 have been 
selected for immediate service, are a picked body of cav- 
alrymen, mostly farmers and farmers' sons. They are 
obliged to find their own mounts and equipment, and are 
drilled much more frequently and severely than either the 
militia or volunteers. Their organization dates back to 
the time of Henry VIII. They are nearly all huntsmen, 
follow the hounds, and do a great deal of cross-country 
riding. It is believed that they will follow much the same 
methods that our own "Rough Riders" did. We now have 
the "home" troops all told. They number 651,900 men. 
What number could be drawn from the body of the nation, 
if calls could be issued for more volunteers, it is of course 
impossible to say. The spirit of the people, however, shows 
that every man able to carry a rifle is ready to march at 
his country's call. The colonies and India remain to be 
taken into account. Second contingents are already on 
the way to South Africa from the different Australian 
colonies, New Zealand, and Canada. The colonials on the 
ground have shown that they can fight equal to the best, 
and it is estimated that at least 100,000 of them can be 
had. England does not care to draw upon her Indian 
forces, but rich and powerful native chiefs are insisting 
that she should, and are offering their swords and their 
fortunes in that behalf. One million and a quarter men 
could be soon gotten ready at a point on the Indian penin- 
sula not far from Africa. It will be seen that the pres- 
ent loss of ten thousand men, sad as it is, does not count 
for much in the presence of the resources we have enum- 
erated. The British dominions constitute an empire of 
peace. Ordinarily they are too deeply immersed in busi- 
ness to be ready for war, as France and Germany always 
are and must be. But if the present or any other emer- 
gency should demand a supreme effort, it would be found 
that British resources are sufficient for any needs she is 
ever likely to encounter. Napoleon I, when asked to name 
the three first essentials to successful warfare, said: 
"Money, and money, and yet money I " . If that be true, 
old England need not feel uncomfortable to any extent! 
She could bankrupt the world to-morro<v by simply calling 
in her own. 



ENGLAND'S SUPERIORITY ON THE HIGH SEAS. 

IT has long been the announced policy of Great Britain 
to keep her navy equal, if not superior, to any two com- 
bined navies of European powers and statistics go to show 
that she sails the seas to-day more confidently, more inde- 
pendently than she has ever done during the past three 
hundred years of her naval supremacy. Although she 
may be meeting with temporary reverses in South Africa, 
on "the high seas Britain is still unequalled, unconquerable. 
Her Navy Department is in the hands of good men and 
Parliament is ever willing to grant unhesitatingly millions 
for ships and their equipment. Her latest naval estimates 
amounted to about $132,970,000, over twice the sum re- 
quired for the needs of the French Navy and over $15,- 
000,000 more than required, and granted, for the pre- 
ceding year. 

The total number of English battleships (including first, 
second and third class, and cruisers) is 173, all of which 
are efficient vessels in every sense of the word. Against 
these France has seventy-five vessels and Russia thirty-six. 
England is especially strong in armored cruisers, having 
119 completed against 32 for France, 20 for Germany, 17 
for Italy, and 13 for Russia. In the matter of her fighting 
sea dogs England is also well prepared and able to cope 
with possible foes. Her fleet is manned by 110,640 men, 
while France has only 42,000 and Russia only 35,000. It 
has been estimated, however, that 40 per cent of the 
British crews consist of foreigners and the British Govern- 
ment is taking measures to overcome this defect by offer- 
ing better inducements to English born subjects to enter 
the service. It must also not be forgotten that England's 
mercantile marine includes over 70 per cent of the world's 
steamers and herein lies her greatest weakness. It is 
plain how necessary it is for her to have a large and 
powerful fleet to protect these freight carriers from an 
enemy's cruisers and commerce destroyers. With her 
present navy she seems well prepared to do this efficiently, 
despite any coalition that might take place between 
European Powers for demonstrated purposes. 

THE WOMEN AFTER THE POLICE COURTS. 

FROM time out of mind the police courts of this city 
have been a law unto themselves. They have been 
venal, corrupt, and unclean to a degree that decent peo- 
ple can hardly be supposed to comprehend. The truth is 
that the Judges have not been so much to blame as the 
Police Department. It has been that department which 
has run the police courts, and made them the scandal and 
shame that they have long been. No man could obtain a 
nomination for a police court judgeship without the aid of 
the "upper office," and if he did he was pretty sure to be 
defeated at the polls. The consequence of all this has 
very naturally been that the Judges have, as a rule, been 
the mere creatures and tools of the power that made 
them, and dire evils have resulted. But at last there is a 
ray of hope that these things may be amended. Good 
women have taken hold of the work of police court reform, 
and, if supported as they ought to be, even the brazen- 
faced police court shysters will be put to shame, the 
Judges will be made to see their duty in a new light, and 
the arresting officer will find it exceedingly dangerous to 
batten and fatten on the culprits whom they ought to 
suppress. Among the several ladies who have addressed 
themselves to the subject of our police courts during the 
past week, is Mrs. Mary Smith, a Professor in Stanford 
University. She has given a good deal of attention to 
police matters in New York and Sao Francisco, and she 
says that "her studies have convinced her that justice in 
our police courts is administered for. the most part in a 
hideous, trivial and dirty manner." She thinks that the 
Judges of those courts ought to be of a higher type, and 
removed from politics. There can be no doubt of the cor- 
rectness of her allegations, nor of the soundness of her 
views. It is well that women like Professor Smith should 
take hold of this subject. They will compel the respect of 
policemen as well as of the Judges, and in the end good is 
bound to result. 

To Cure La Grippe in Two Days. 
Take Laxative Brotuo Quinine Tablets. All druggists refund the 
money if it fails to cure. E. W. Grove's signature is on each box. 25c. 

Fine Sanitary Plumbing at J. Ahlbach's, 136 Fourth street. 



February 3, 1900. 



BAH 1 ■ HEWS I.) 11 I 1:. 




r^ Automobiles 



TO THE FRONT 



THE latest "fad" to reach us from the fashionable cen- 
ters of the East is the "Animals" dinner. Now be it 
understood this is not an occasion of witnessing animals 
feed, but the beaux and belles of our swim are to attend 
a swagger dinner arrayed as animals of their own selec- 
tion. How about acting the character? asks an old bach. 
Easy enough, replies Madame, when so man."- deer, kids, 
calfs, old cats, pigs, and donkeys abound right among us. 
be same, the acting out of some of these characteris- 
tics might be a trifle "too too." Deer and kids are such 
frequent and familiar sights at cotillion and dinner there 
would not be the smack of novelty in them which every 
hostess of to-day seeks in her entertainments. 

* * * 

One of the prettiest sights this season was the handling 
of the national flag by the beautifully-costumed women at 
the cotillion of the Jeunesse Club, but a lady of much social 
experience remarked at Mrs. Irwin's card party that it 
was as good as a circus to witness the rush for "buttons," 
saying that she had been told the men were so wearied 
of answering requests for their buttons that the idea of 
firing an assortment of them at the girls had been adopted 
and used as a figure in the cotillion, and was entirely suc- 
cessful, as each girl got a trophy of the affair, and " but- 
tons" as well. 

* * * 

The way divorces are multiplying in the beau monde 
makes Dne absolutely shiver. If, as has been hinted, a 
second experience of the sort is to be the fate of a certain 
pretty woman, no wonder the moralist is beginning to beg 
the powers that be, whether civil or ecclesiastic, to step 
in and cry halt. 

* * * 

Can it be true the rumor which is going round that at 
the last "baby" dinner given in our swim a well known 
member of that charmed circle for the past decade ap- 
peared as "mamma's baby boy" in regulation dress, bare 
legs and short stockings, etc. ? The wonder is how he ever 
got clothes to fit his rotund frame. 

* * * 

A member of a leading family was complaining bitterly 
the other day at a swell tea that since the ultra rich have 
taken up the progressive euchre fad, no one can hope to 
succeed who does not buy out a jewelry store. 

* # # 

The latest news from the Orient goes that a beautiful 
girl who recently left here for a visit to the seat of war, 
has made a capture en route, and another wedding in the 
big church on the hill will probably be the result. 



ii i 



HOW TO BE B EAUTIFUL. 

TO look beautiful is a duty which the fair sex owes 
both to themselves and their friends,' said one of 
the wise men of modern times, 'and with the discoveries of 
modern scientists there is no good reason why they 
shouldn't perform that duty. Every one should do all in 
his or her power to supplement nature in adorning the person, and 
while it is true that a tine complexion is not given to all, yet the 
work of nature, not always beautiful, may be improved upon in 
many ways.' The many thousands who have been benefited by Dr. 
T. F. trouraud's Oriental Cream, or Magical Beautitier, appreciate 
this, and know its value as a cosmetic. They know that a skin that 
is freckled, tanned, pimpled or moth-patched can be made like the 
new born babe's. It has been recommended by physicians for those 
who will use toilet preparations, and the Board of Health has de- 
clared it free from all injurious properties. All druggists and fancy 
goods stores appreciate its value and keep it for sale. "—The Mail and 
Express, New York, Sept. 8th., 1898. 

PARKER'S COUGH CURE. 

A Sovereign Remedy. One dose will stop a cough. It never fails. 
Try it. Price, 25 cents. Geobse Dahlbendes & Co., 214 Kearny 
street. For sale by all druggists. 

Fine stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. Cooper & Co. 
746 Market street. San Francisco. 



The Sparks Machine 
the Best. : : : 

Tho UghtMli ■tienvMt, cheapest end most durable, it olimbi tho ntoopea 

grade* and is piftOttOBhlfl OD all kinds of roads. 

It is what everybody wants. 

There is an active demand for the company's stock. 

There Is more money to be made In Automobiles than In Oil or Mining. 

A limited amount of stock is offered at One Dollar per share. Par value $10 
Full information at the o Qice of the 

Sparks Automobile Company 

325 Parrott Buildine. San Francisco, Oal. S. GUODENOUGH, Seoratary. 



You cannot diminish drunkenness without diminishing crime, 
insanity, pauperism, and taxes. 

All this is done by 



The Keeley 
Institute 



At 1170 Market Street, 
Donohoe Building, S. F. 



Or Carson City, Nevada. 



College San Rafael 



For Young Ladies 



Conducted by the Sisters of St. Dominie. 
Full collegia course of studies. A boarding school of highest 
grade. _ Superb modern buildine:. Steam heated. Beautiful and 
commodious class rooms. Music and art rooms. 

Located in the lovely Magnolia Valley 
Unsurpassed for beauty and healthf ulness. Address, 



Mother Superior 

College San Rafael, San Rafael. Cal. 



FRENCH LIBRARY AND FRENCH CLASSES 

This library is the most important of its kind, containing 20,000 books. 
Among them are the best ancient and latest authors. Under the auspices 
of the library are French classes for adults only, afternoons and evenings. 
Graduate teachers from France give tuition. Terms for library, 8l admission. 
50 cents monthly. Terms for classes— $3 a month, 2 lessons a week, entitling 
pupils to literary membership. Apply— French Library, City of Paris Build- 
ing, 135 Geary street. 

The Solly Walter School of Illustration 

In Pen and Ink. 

26 O'Farrell street 

WM. WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LDT. OF ABERDEEN.) 

V V o 

SCOTCH WHISKY 

Importers - HACONDRAY & CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 3, 1900. 



|fff^j£§TlfatfD 



"We obey no wand but Pleasure's.''— Tom Moore. 

1CAN applaud the Bob Acres of Louis James — but only 
moderately. While it shows something of the same easy 
modern grasp that marked Mr. James' Charles Surface 
in The School for Scandal, it is lacking in the humor aDd 
unaffected good nature that belonged to the part. Mr. 
James is a comedian by cultivation — or, to be more ac- 
curate, by reparation. It is in the light, human moments 
of comedy that he atones for the deep mouthed tragic 
poses that for so many years pleased the groundlings and 
offended the fastidious. But Mr. James is not a born 
comedian. He has the hearty, robust rather than the 
comic instinct. And he lacks that gentle heart quality 
that plays such an important part in the Bob Acres of 
Joseph Jefferson or Nat Goodwin. Still, his Acres is a 
performance worth seeing. It is cordial and funny all the 
way through and frequently illuminated by flashes of 
genuine humor. 

Lydia Languish is an ungrateful part at best, and in it 
Miss Kidder shows no new abilities and certainly no new 
enthusiasm. Mr. Langdon plays Sir Anthony in the usual 
stormy way. There is no character in the acting — merely 
steam and convention. 

The best all-round work was contributed by Mrs. Van- 
denhoff iD the Malaprop part. While more or less conven- 
tional in its scheme of acting, the figure was presented 
with vigor and with fun. 

* * * 

The theatres have not been exciting this week so far as 
novelty is concerned. In fact the only novelty in the 
"legitimate" theatres was a farce-comedy at the Alhambra 
called His Better Half, a bad piece badly acted by the worst 
kind of actors — a performance that was beneath serious 
consideration and not of enough importance even to poke 
jokes at. With The Idol's Eye and In Paradise still on at 
the Tivoli and California, and old classics by familiar people 
at the Columbia, and a revival of Peaceful Valley at the 
Alcazar, there was really nothing new except at the 
Orpheum. Except at the Orpheum ! How ungrateful 
that sounds. It is always the Orpheum we fall back on 
when the rest of the town is dull — and when the town is not 
dull, too, for tbat matter. It counts not a little bit 
whether we have Henry Irving or Melba at any of the 
other theatres, there is still a big crowd left for the Or- 
pheum, and during at least fifty-one weeks out of the fifty- 
two a good show to entertain it. The present week is not 
by long odds the unlucky fifty-second. The Orpheum show 
is decidedly good. While there are no world-beaters in the 
bill, nearly every act is in its line a winner, and five of 
them are new this week. The special favorite of these five 
is composed of five diminutive pickaninnies, who aid the 
Sehlkes, Mr. and Mrs., apparently. The lady sings and 
he twirls, but you don't think much about them, the real 
twinklers are the five little coons, who sing and dance in 
ragtime and wear hardly more than the pumpkin-colored 
cuticle they were born in, except for a few palmleaf orna- 
ments. This palm episode is delightfully contrived. 

Irene Franklin, who has graduated from the little girl 
stage and developed into a well-built party of moderate 
years, continues to sing coon songs in spite of the fact 
that I told her several years ago that her success lay in 
another direction. Miss Franklin is good natured and 
entertaining, but her ragtime is too Yankee for the real 
thing. Two boys and a girl who call themselves the 
Partie Trio do the most dangerous and the most graceful 
and entertaining act on the high wire that has been seen 
here. 

* * * 

The revival of Peaceful Valhy by the stock company at 
the Alcazar is remarkable for the excellent character 
study of Earnest Hastings in the Sol Smith Russell part 
of fiosea Howe. It was Mr. Hastings' performance of 
the same part a year or so ago that stamped him as an 
actor of importance. I prefer Mr. Hastings in parts of 
distinot character, and this one belongs in that special 
list of his that is headed by the Sheriff in Thomas' In Niz- 



zoura. The bill for next week is that interesting comedy- 
drama of Edward Milton Royle's, Friends, and it will serve 
to introduce the Alcazar's new leading woman, Mary 
Hampton, in the role originally played by Selena Fetter 
Royle. The part ought to fit Miss Hampton. Mr. Hast- 
ings is cast for the Mr. Royle part. 

* # * 

Since the success of In Paradise Mr. Frawley has be- 
come a firm believer in the pecuniary accomplishments of 
the naughty French farce. He will break the Sabbath to- 
morrow night with The Cuckoo. Here is all I know about it. 
The Cuckoo, in its English plumage, bad its original 
flight at the Avenue Theatre, London, on March 2, 1899. 
Before the month was over it had been brought to this 
country, was produced at New Haven March 31st, and 
three days later began its New York career at Wallack's 
Theatre. The name of the play does not come immediately 
from the bird itself, but from a newspaper bearing the 
title, and which figures conspicuously in the plot. The 
Penfolds are not a perfectly-matched pair. He is of com- 
monplace appearance and affectionately undemonstrative, 
while she is a beauty and fond of the adulation that is 
beauty's due. Moreover, each has found a companionable 
person outside the marital bond. Upon the advice of her 
husband, who has a little affair of his own to attend to, 
Mrs. Penfold takes an outing on Maidensbourne-on-the- 
Thames, with her admirer, Hugh Ferrant, who incidentally 
distinguishes himself by rescuing an unknown drowning 
map, and afterwards by saving the life of a blackamoor 
king by recapturing a lion that has escaped from a travel- 
ing show. While at the Flowerpot Inn, Mrs. Penfold is 
recognized by Colefax, and it is not unnaturally concluded 
by the inn attaches that Ferrant is Mr. Penfold. The 
Cuckoo publishes an account of the supposed Penfold's 
bravery, and then, having offered as a prize for such deeds 
a medal, seeks to bestow it upon the real Penfold, who of 
course does not know what it ail means. In the resultant 
confusion Mrs. Penfold sees a way out of her escapade by 
turning the tables on her husband, which she accomplishes 
by showing him the story in The Cuckoo, and accusing him 
of having been at Maidensbourne with another woman. 
This causes more complications, but assists in eventually 
clearing the atmosphere and bringing about a satisfactory 
understanding between husband and wife, and between 
them and Ferrant, who becomes more than ever the friend 
of the family, and no more than a friend to the more at- 
tractive member of it. L. R. Stockwell has been specially 
engaged to play Penfold. 

# * * 

Thursday's symphony concert divulged a good pro- 
gramme, an admirable band of some seventy musicians, 
Henry Holmes, and an audience that would have been of 
size in a smaller auditorium than that of the Grand Opera 
House. The big symphony was Beethoven's "Eroica," 
and Mr. Holmes's handling of it was decidedly tame. 
Essentially a Beethovenist, as Mr. Holmes is, there is 
hardly any excuse for his prosy reading of this most poetic 
work. In the unfinished symphony of Schubert he was in 
better touch with the score and the bandsmen, and the 
Tschaikowsky "Romeo and Juliet" overture he handled 
with better sympathy than marked his performance of the 
same composer's "Pathetique" at the previous concert. 
This is faint praise for Mr. Holmes, and meant as such. 
He is a musician of international reputation, a scholar in 
his profession, but he has not the personal spell that en- 
thuses his band and his audience. The principal pieces of 
yesterday's programme had been played here before by 
Fritz Scheel, and not even the most adoring admirer of 
Mr. Holmes would care to make a comparison, notwith- 
standing the present symphony orchestra is bigger and 
more industriously rehearsed than it was in the days of 
Scheel. I believe in symphony concerts, I believe in a per- 
manent orchestra, I respect a learned leader. But music 
is, after all, a matter of the emotions, and the leader who 
cannot touch your emotions is not the big man. The 
Holmes symphony concerts are not uninteresting. In- 
deed, they deserve liberal patronage. But it is only my 
duty to say that they are not the concerts that in the 
same excellent circumstance might be given by a leader 
of temperament and individuality. Mr. Holmes is a beau- 
tiful old man, but when he leads I find more pleasure in 
looking than in listening. 



February 3, 1900. 



BAN I [hi:. 



The popular Uostonians will no doubt be greeted with 
crowded houses at the Columbia Theatre next Monday 
night when they make their re-entree in the new light 
opera iijlm uf / ly Minkowsky, a San 

Francisco composer. This work is said to be a tuneful and 
spirited composition, and has been favorably commented 
upon in other cities. This year the Bostooians have been 
reinforced with a strong list of singers, and noted among 
the names are such well-known favorites as Henry Clay 
Barnabee. W. H. Macdonald, Helen Bertram, Marcia Van 
Dresser, George Frothingham, Frank Rushworth, John 
Dunsmure, Josephine Bartlett, Grace Cameron, Frederick- 
Knights, W. H. Fitzgerald, Charles R. Hawley, Edith 
Hendee and S. L. Studley. Thr Smuggler* will be cast 
with all the favorites in the leading roles and will be con- 
tinued for the first week. The new comic opera, 7V 
/, by Victor Herbert will be produced here during 
the season. 

* * » 

The Tivoli has no reason to change its present attrac- 
tion, and the merry comic opera, The Idol's Eye, com- 
mences the fourth week of its present run on Monday 
evening next. When a play can run for three consecutive 
weeks to crowded houses, and the public, by its demand 
for seats, asks for more presentations, it is proof positive 
of the excellence of the production. San Francisco has 
never had so complete a presentation as the Tivoli Opera 
House is now giving with The Idol's Eye, and it would be 
difficult to find in any of the famous comic opera organiza- 
tions sent out from New York a cast of artists, principals 
and chorus, who give so finished a performance as the 
Tivoli singers are now giving. The Idol's Eye is without 
doubt the greatest kind of a "hit," and it will without 
doubt crowd the Tivoli as long as it is kept in the bill. 
When the present success is withdrawn it will be followed 
by an elaborate and up-to-date version of the comic opera, 
Manila Bound, in which the Tivoli promises its patrons 
many surprises. 

* # * 

The Orpheum management has for next week a bill 
which is fairly top-heavy with talent. At the head come 
Mr. and Mrs. Perkins Fisher, who will present a char- 
acter sketch by Ezra Kendall, entitled The Half-Way 
House. The sketch is said to be one of the most original 
and quaintest on the road. Cyrus Dare is a ventriloquist 
and all-round society entertainer, who, up to within a few 
months ago, was one of the regular performers at the 
private entertainments given by the Queen and Prince of 
Wales. The funny Mitchells are eccentric comedians, and 
their act, Aunt Mandy's Mishaps, is said to be extremely 
amusing and full of clever situations. The hold-overs are: 
The Holloways, Bruet and Riviere, Sehlke's Pickaninnies, 
Irene Franklin, the Partie Trio and Papinta. 

* * * 

The Frawleys will begin the last week of their engage- 
ment Sunday night, February 11th, when Keith Wakeman, 
just returned from London triumphs, will appear in An 
Unconventional Honeymoon, one of Daly's comedies. 

* * * 

Mrs. Adelaide Lloyd-Smith, dramatic soprano, who 
studied under Mme. Marchesi, and later under Etoire 
Barili, the half brother and instructor of Adelina Patti, 
will give a concert at the Sherman Clay Hall next Tues- 
day evening. Mme. Lloyd-Smith comes with a splendid 
artistic reputation. She will be assisted by the Minetti 
String Quartette, and Cantor E. J. Stark, baritone. Ros- 
coe Warren Lucy will be the accompanist, and Elias M. 
Hecht will play the flute obligato to Bischop's " Lo ! Hear 
the Gentle Lark." The programme has been carefully 
prepared. 

* * * 

In Jewish circles the greatest interest is being taken in 
the big benefit which is to come off at the Columbia on the 
11th inst. The performance will be a reproduction of 
many of the acts given at vari us entertainmets at the 
Concordia Club and the Verein. All the performers will 
be amateurs. The receipts will go to the Emanuel Sister- 
hood, and the tickets will sell for $5 and $2. Judging from 
the present demand the supply will be hardly adequate 
even at these prices. 

Mothers, be sure and use " Mrs. wlnslow's Soothine Sjtup " for your 
children while teethlne. 



The 



I I.. 13 



Osteopathic Institute 

Or. A. ( No.Hr. IV. J. I Haitey, V T. Noon 
Chrom. DbeatM and Deformities SUCCESSFULLY treated 
204 Sutt.r SI.. San Francisco. Phone. Main 100. 



California Theatre. 



1111: riirn.Aii HOTJBS. 

Rencrx-tittMii- bf 'I'lt.-hr. Main 1731 

n« Sunday iiIl-M. P»b, Ith. I-'hawlky Oomp-ahu lit 
Oharlea rrohnuuva am»l Ihraa Ml o o n wd i in 

THE CUCKOO 

Adnpted from Iho French by Charles Brook field. " li '* a bird." 
Special onancemeDl "f L, k. Btookwell. 
Remit ar < Wlfornla Theatre pi 

•ruary 11th: Weloome home from London ofl 

Isttnirulahod urir.:-*-, Kkitii Wakeman. 



Columbia Theatre. 



Gottlob, Marx A Co.. 

Lettuces mid Managers. 



Conimcncine next Monday, February 5th. Engagement limited 
io fifteen Dfgbta and three matinees. The famous Bostom ash, 
presenting: for the first lime here the tiarht opera, 

THE 



SMUGGLERS 



In preparation: Tbk Vickuoy. 



OF BADAYEZ 

By Minkowsky and Ranken. 



fll*---- T L „ -. X „« Belasco & Thall, Managers. 

nlcazar I neatre. Ph0ne.Mah.2w. 

Week of February 5th. First appearanoe at this theatre of Miss 
Mary Hampton, when will be presented Milton Royle's comedy 

FRIENDS 

with special scenery and a great cast. 

Oii Susannah next. 

Alcazar Prices— 15c, 25c, 35c, 50c 



Tivoli Opera House. 



Mrs. Ernestine Kreling, 

Proprietor and Manager. 



The Idol's Eye" still shines brightly. Next Monday evening 
Feb. 5th, begins the fourth week of the enormous success, the 
comic opera, 

THE IDOL'S EYE 

Every evening at 8. Matinee Saturday at 2. 

Over forty thousand people have heard "The Idol's Eye" in three 

weeks. 

Popular Prices— 25c and 50c Telephone for seats. Bush 9. 



Orph 



eum. 

Cyrus Dare 
The Holloways 



San Francisco's Greatest Music Hall. 

O'Farrell St.. between Stockton and Powell streets. 



The Funny Mitchells 
Bruet & Riviere 



MR. AND MRS. PERKINS FISHER 

Sehlke's Pickaninnies Irene Franklin 

Partie Trio Papinta 

Reserved Seats 25c; balcony 10c: opera chairs and box seats 50c 
Matinees Wednesday, Saturday, and Sunday. 

Sherman, Glay X? Go. 's Hall. 

Tuesday evening, February 6th, at 8:15. Concert given by 

MRS. ADELAIDE LLOYD-SMITH 

Dramatic Soprano, assisted by the Minetti Quartette and Cantok 
E. J. Stark: Roscor Warren Luoy, accompanist; flute obli- 
gato by Elias M. Hecht. 
Reserved seats, $1; on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s music store 

Grand Opera House-Special. 

Thursday afternoon, February 1st, at 3:15. Second of the series of 

SYMPHONY CONCERTS 

Augmented orchestra, 



Under the direction of Henry Holmes. 
Seventy musicians. 

Reserved Seats: 25c, 50c. 75c, Si, and 81.50. 
the season. Sale begins at Sherman, Clay & 
this Saturday morning, at 9 o'clock. 



Special prices for 
Co.'s music store 



After the Theatre 

Go where the crowd goes— to 

ZINKAND'S 

Listen to Stark's matchless string band and enjoy the .finest 
wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand is society's gathering place after the show is 
over. 



H. Isaac Jones, M. D. 



Eye, Ear, Nose, and Throat. 



Office— 234 Post street, between Grant avenue and Stockton 
streets, S. F. Hours, 10 a. m. to 4 . p. 111. 
Sunday by appointment. Tel. Grant 10 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 3, 1900. 



r 3 z h 




Luther Strong, In "Luther Strong," a new book by Mr. 

His Wooing Thomas J. Vivian, author of "With Dewey 

« ., ., ., at Manila," "The Fall of Santiago," 

And Madness, u Judge Da y's Case| » etC) we fin d a 

clever character study of one whose habitat is an out-of- 
the-way corner of New York State. Where a spur of the 
Taconic Mountains runs down into the meeting angle of 
Vermont and Massachusetts. In the upland valleys of 
these mountains and along their slatey sides lie the 
scattered hamlets of which the Shaker Hollow of the book 
is a type. When the stage coaches ran over these hill- 
roads from the Hudson towns to those of Vermont business 
was thriving everywhere, but with "the death of staging 
from an over dose of steam and iron," as Mr. Vivian ex- 
presses it, came a material decline in its prosperity. As 
time goes on the people become narrow and superstitious 
and it is from this condition that the author has drawn his 
characters. Luther Strong, the central figure, is des- 
cribed as "a stalwart young American of the retired dis- 
tricts, bearing no imported alloy, having the ring of the 
native metal and carrying the physical characteristics of 
a distinct race. With rather small but well-shaped head, 
set on square shoulders, broad chested, lean shanked, 
running to bone and steely sinew rather than to spongy 
muscle or flesh padding; deliberate but tireless; having a 
reverence for a part that for generations has been 
associated with the soil he treads on, but passably free to 
believe in and use the improvements of the present, taking 
the variabilities of season with the endurance of a horse; 
with the seeds of a simple education cast in the ground of 
a shrewd and naturally quick mind, a reader of the papers; 
a man of opinions; helpful to the women; a believer in home 
comforts but a heretic in luxuries, sharp at a bargain and 
happy in a strong sense of humor — this rustic of the 
Atlantic States is as purely typical as Giles Scroggins of 
Somersetshire with his calfless leg and hob-nailed boots, 
or as Jean Fermier of Provence, with his simplicity and 
sabots." Lovemaking and jealousy, plots and mysteries, 
madness and sudden deaths, make up a romance stirring 
enough to satisfy those who prefer sensationalism to 
character study. The book should therefore appeal to a 
wide range of readers. The place that "Luther Strong" 
will take in fiction is perhaps hard to determine, but as a 
romance founded on the play of human passions it will 
stand out in the unmistakable clearness of being true to 
life. 

Luther Strong. His Wooine and Madness: by Thomas J. Vivian R F 
Fenno & Co., Publishers. New York. Price $1.25. 

Our Native A little book of one hundred and fifty pages, 
Birds. which appeals particularly to those who love 

to hear the morning song of the wild bird, 
is "Our Native Birds," by Mr. D. Lange. It describes 
how to protect them and how attract them to our homes. 
There is a very interesting chapter on how to get rid of 
that modern nuisance, the English house sparrow. We in 
California have so few song birds — Why ?— that we should 
take all means to increase this music of the woods and 
dales. The pen and ink drawings by Mr. Herman Giehler 
of St. Paul, Minnesota, throw light on the text and help 
to make attractive a book that will be of value to every 
lover of birds. 

Our Native Birds: by D. Lance. The Macmillan Company. Publishers 
New York. Price, SI. 

Among English "The stranger who would form a correct 
Hedgerows. opinion of the English character must not 
confine his observations to the metropolis. 
He must go forth into the country; he must sojourn in 
villages and hamlets; he must visit castles, villas, farm- 
houses, cottages; he must wander through parks and gar- 
dens; along hedges and green lanes; he must loiter about 
country churches, and cope with the people in all their 
conditions, and all their habits and humors." This quota- 
tion from Washington Irving is the keynote of Mr. Clifton 
Johnson's book, "Among English Hedgerows." Into the 
quiet roads and through the rural villages of England he 



went with an eye ever on the alert for the picturesque and 
the beautiful, and a camera to bear witness to the fascina- 
tion of that whereof he wrote. The title of Mr. Johnson's 
book could not have been better chosen, for it is among the 
hedgerows that one sees and hears the most characteristic 
beauty of England. Mr. Hamilton Wright Mabie's intro- 
duction adds charm to a charming book. The illustrations 
are many and interesting. 

Among English Hedgerows: by Clifton Johnson. "With an introduction 
by Hamilton W. Mabie. The Macmillan Company, Publishers, New York. 
Price, $2.25. 

Tramping with In "Tramping With Tramps" Mr. Flynt 
Tramps. °as given us a real insight into the Hobo 

world, for he lived with them in England, 
France, Germany, Russia, and the United States. The work 
is worth more than a mere passing of an idle hour with a 
new book — it is a story in sociology of vast interest to the 
student and criminologist. Mr. Flynt dressed, lived, 
starved and went to prison with his quondam friends, and 
his conclusions are of great value from a practical stand- 
point towards doing away (were it possible) with this 
evil of fin de such evolution. 

Tramping With Tramps: by Josiah Flynt. With an Introduction by Hon. 
Andrew D. White, TJ. S. Ambassador to Germany. The Century Co., Pub- 
lishers, New York. Price, $1.50. 

. c A new edition, revised and enlarged, of Mr. 

pra.ne Folks. Ham]in Garland's "Prairie Folks," has just 
appeared. The stories were written about the same time 
as those contained in "Main-Traveled Roads," and may be 
considered a companion piece or second series. The tales 
are nearly all of the prairie lands of the West, and refer, 
the author states, to conditions that have already passed 
or are passing away. These stories are full of pathos and 
realism, and take a firm hold upon the memory. 

Prairie Folks: by Hamlin Garland. The MacmiUan Company, Publishers. 
New York. Price, 81.25. 

The Honey Jar, a Receptacle for Literary Preserves, a 
dainty little periodical of which D. C. Sapp is the editor, is 
published monthly, and is filled with literary matter quite 
in keeping with its appearance. It contains much good 
reading, and will furthermore commend itself to many 
booklovers through its numerous reproductions of well- 
known book-plates, with, in some cases, fly-leaf descrip- 
tions. During the past few months the series has in- 
cluded those of George Washington, Oliver Wendell 
Holmes, Ellen Terry, Eugene Field, Lady Blessington, 
Thomas B. Mosher (of Bibelot fame), and others. With 
scholarly essays and well chosen poems, this little maga- 
zine should find a permanent place among our periodicals 
of a dainty order. It makes this announcement: "As it 
is 'A Receptacle for Literary Preserves,' its contents are 
not up to date. Preserves may be spicy, but are not to be 
expected to take the place of fresh fruit. This is by way 
of explanation — not of apology. We have tried to make 
the ' Honey Jar ' like Cooper's wine, 'good of its kind.'" 
The Champlin Press, Publishers, Columbus, Ohio. Five 
cents per copy or fifty cents per year. 

"Mandelay," by Rudyard Kipling, has been added to 
the Lark series. It is a dainty little book and a dainty 
little bit of prosody in Kipling's best Barrack-room style. 
The illustrations, some of them in color, are by Robert 
Edgren, and the cover design is by Porter Garnett. 
Doxey, At the Sign of the Lark, Publisher. Price, 75c. 

"The Wonderful Stories of Jane and John," by Gertrude 
Smith, is a fascinating book for young people. The illustra- 
tions in color by Alice Woods are original and will appeal 
to the eye of the ittle ones. Herbert S. Stone, Publisher, 
New York. 

"Tristram of Blent" is the title of Mr. Anthony Hope's 
new novel. It is a story of England and the period is the 
present. 

"The World's Mercy" is the title of anew novel by Max- 
well Gray, announced for early publication by D. Apple- 
ton & Co. 

Ernest Seton-Thompson's "Biography of a Grizzly," 
which has been running as a serial in the Cent try Maga- 
zine will soon be issued in book form. 

M. E. B. 



February 3, 1900. 



SAN ] ITER. 




" Hear Ihe CTIer?" ' Whel the derll «H Hi 
" One ih.i -ill i.l.r Itao devil, dr. with too." 

SM exhibited 
A freak that's truly qn< 
For butane*), there's the clergyman 
Who doo'l object to beer. 

The lawyer, loo. who tells the (ruth 

Anil chines for honesty. 
Also the loot who says bis prayers 

And walks In virtue's way. 

The banker's son. who. out of choice, 
Consorts with thieves and plugs; 

The preacher who, of preaching tired. 
Goes forth to fight with pags. 

But to my mind no queerer qneer 

Inhabits Earth's queer places, 
Than that sometime demure schoolma'am 

Who swears and plays the races. 

IT appears that Maude Gonne. described as the Irish 
"Joan of Arc," probably by reason of the difference, is 
doing America the honor to visit it. Maude is a young 
woman who has turned the wrongs of Ireland to some 
profit. Upon arrival she was met by a lot of her country- 
men bearing, not the green flag, nor yet the stars and 
stripes, but the banners of the Transvaal and Orange Free 
State Republics. Maude has consented to go into the Joan 
business for the Boers, too, the cruelties practiced upon 
the Celt having just at present been forced into a back 
seat by the vociferous acclaim which heralds the cruelties 
practiced upon the Dutch. However, no gang of natural- 
ized citizens, with the peat still clinging to their heels, 
have any right to meet an incoming ship and show the 
colors of Kruger. There is a flag here, the essential hues 
of which are red, white and blue, and it has floated over 
some very decent people, a part of whom have been led to 
fijjht in its shadow and think they were not making a mis- 
take. Of course the arrival of Maude does not call for a 
display of this emblem, but where is the good old green? 

ST Pasadena last week The Spider and Fly company 
disbanded, and a Los Angeles paper published the 
following: "Anyone desiring to give employment to eight 
darling little chorus girls will do the afore-mentioned 
darlings a favor by communicating with them." The 
ladies of the chorus seem to be having a hard time of it 
lately. Several are said to depend entirely on their 
salaries. 

WHEN a Pasadena judge last week asked Captain 
Burnham, late of the army, if he ever struck his wife 
with his cane, the brave warrior replied, with deep emo- 
tion, "No, but I ought to have done it forty years ago." 
As the Burnhams have been married, according to the 
dispatches, just forty-one years, Pasadena gossips are 
wondering what happened as the honeymoon waned. 

GENERAL TORRES is provoking a Mexican war by 
shooting American citizens whenever the sport 
amuses him. If things keep on at the present rate, we 
will soon come to regard squabbles with the bastard 
Spanish stock about as seriously as the British regard a 
tiger-hunt. 

ft CURRENT newspaper item relating to a young 
woman who had the misfortune to be injured in a bas- 
ket ball contention says that she cannot possibly survive 
another operation, and that the operation is absolutely 
necessary. Thus does the reportorial mind once more 
shed a great white light. 

FOLICE Officer Connell captured a deserter from the 
army and received a reward of $30. The deserter has 
re-deserted, but Connell says that he is on the trail and 
ready for another $30. I wonder what the other fellow 
gets? 

HU BER, the waiter who found somebody's $500 in the 
back room of a cafe, has been recovered together 
with $345. The man who lost the roll will never kick 
again about the slowness of waiters. 



N' 



Ml: Dl ,me w.»s 1 to the 

11 the other day ntxl whor 
tion as to what he llkni ix-st in B 
"that bit of jingle on me in the Nni 

of weeks back. I can't write better Irish than that me 
self," said Dooley Dunne. I have lontr wanted to compli- 
ment my fellow-laborer the I.ckikfh On on the excellence 
his jingle, and it may please him to know that In this in- 
stance 1 put aside all feeling of professional rivalry and 
most heartily endorse Mr. Dunne's applause. Still, I 
think the Crier is something of an all-round rymester 
himself. Only a few weeks ago one of his metrical stunts 
was pirated by the Police Gazette. He does not despair 
of seeing himself in the Sunday Call one of these days. 

PROFESSOR Goldwin Smith declares that the theory 
that the Maine was blown up by the spontaneous and 
fiery expansion of the coal in its hold has been accepted. 
Goldwin is accustomed to being called an ass, and evi- 
dently pines for the change he would experience in being 
called a liar. 

ZL CERTAIN writer of headings on a San Francisco 
1 X. evening paper is making giant strides toward fame. 
A few days ago the following double column head appeared: 
A corner on Dogs. He married six. And a day later: 
Two of the Queen's grandchildren have arrived; more are 
expected. 

f OW Bryan takes the stump again, 
And loudly he doth holler: 
" I see upon the G. O. P. 

The stamp-mark of the dollar." 

And it has not been very long 

Since silver hosts did join 
To sing the sovereign virtues of 

That useful silver coin. 

LUCY CRAWFORD, a mother of San Diego, has been 
the latest to sacrifice ber infant child to the fool fad 
of Christian Science, which denies medical aid to the suf- 
fering. The child is to be congratulated, but a benign 
Providence should render Lucy barren. 

SOME fun is being poked at a Coroner's jury for having 
found a man guilty of murder. Of course such a ver- 
dict can be of no effect, and yet at some stage of the game 
it is almost a comfort to have a murderer found guilty, 
even if the truth does not hurt him. 

" ■'pHE women of '96 " are appealing to the San Fran- 
1 cisco public just now for "second-hand baby car- 
riages." The average man with a second-hand baby will 
doubtless haste with gladsome steps to give its carriage 
away. Perhaps he might give the baby, too. 
f PON "Sensations Felt by Animals" 

David Starr Jordan lately did discant. 
And all the feelings of the beasts of Earth 
Were ably handled by that sage savant. 

But one important point was not discussed — 

The point would be of interest, I am sure- 
Just what's the feeling that exists between 
The British Lion and the Transvaal Boer? 

ftN old lady in Webster, Tenn., writes to this city that 
she would like to marry a San Francisco man who is 
"a friend to the poor." I know of many an impecunious 
youth who is poor enough to befriend himself on such a 
proposition— provided the lady can afford to pay. 

LAWYER Frederick Roe Pratt of Chicago is the latest 
glistening example of ability to outwit the corpora- 
tions. By getting news by telepathy of the death of his 
twin brother in Manila, he kept many good dollars from 
the cable companies. 

THERE is something wrong with the newspaper accu- 
sations that secrets of the police office have been 
given away. Given away? Well, at least the fellows who 
bought them will be surprised to know the secrets were 
given away. 

PROVIDENCE often manages to even things up in odd 
ways. Here's tailor Ritzwaller of Seattle, who has 
had the usual sad experience of trusting tailors, has been 
left a half million dollars by his sure-enough Dutch uncle. 

ONE of the Gould family has paid $10,000 for two dogs, 
and is accused of extravagance. Yet the family paid 
much more for a count who had less sense than either of 
the purps. 



U" 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 3, 1900. 




e1e@Ker=0n 

r* J - ~ '- 1 q 4 r " • 1 r^s, - *" 



If 'niidst Kentucky's meads of blue 
A summer love-dream comes to you, 
And if yon gaze on eyes of brown 
And wish that someone were your own, 
Take just a word of good advice 
Before you plunge in Paradise; 
Become a quick, unerring shot, 
Or they will plant you, if you're not, 
In Old Kentuck. 

If, likewise, in the Bluegrass State 
You ever dream of waxing great 
And if you have a wish to stand 
Among the highest in the land, 
A hint to you, before you mix 
In red-hot southern politics ; 
First make your will, then buy a gun, 
For politics and war are one 
In Old Kentuck. 



Even though he has softened the effect of his fierce 
moustache by wearing Phelan whiskers, and foresworn 
the top hat in favor of the modest derby, John Fouga is 
still the prince of amateur bunko steerers when a good 
cause is to be served. His latest victim is Alfred O. 
Larkin, clubman and capitalist, and the beneficiary is the 
Press Club, of which Mr. Fouga is one of the most glitter- 
ing lay members. 

It seems that Mr. Larkin was the proud possessor of 
Amadee Joullin's famous ballet girl picture — the dream in 
crimson with the young woman seated at the pianoforte, 
arms out, skirts erect, and legs clocking the hour of a 
quarter after nine. 

Well, Fouga wanted this Joullin painting for the Press 
Club. The members of the Press Club are partial to 
crimson and ballet girls. He invited Larkin to present it 
to the club, but Larkin declined with thanks. He offered 
to buy it for the club at his own (Fouga's) price, and again 
did Larkin decline with thanks. By this time Fouga's 
Southern temperament was at the boiling point, and he 
swore to get that picture for the club even if he had to 
wade in Larkin gore and steal it. 

But there were more peaceful means to this end, and 
the nation was spared the bloody spectacle of a feud be- 
tween the Fougas and the Larkius 

This is how it happened. They met, Fouga and Larkin, 
in a down-town cafe. They razzle-dazzled the ivories for 
a drink. Fouga won. For another drink. Fouga won. 
For still another. And still Fouga won. 

Larkin had a thirst for revenge. "I'll shake you for a 
suit of clothes," said he. 

"You will not," said Fouga. "I have twenty-six 
already." 

"I'll shake you for a twenty." 

"I never gamble for money," said Fouga without a 
blush: "but see here, Larkin, I'd like to get that red bal- 
let girl for the Press Club, and by gum, I'll shake you for 
itl" 

"I'm your man," said Larkin. And straightway the 
dice box rattled bonefully. 

Two "horses" — or perhaps I would better use the Eng- 
lish word "legs" in this ballet yarn — were upon Mr. Lar- 
kin in swift succession. An hour later the ballet girl was 
sunning her red charms on the wall at the Press Club 
with a card announcing that the picture had been pre- 
sented by John Fouga and Alfred O. Larkin. 

They met again the next day, Wednesday. 

"I say, Fouga," said Larkiu, "I've been thinking about 
that last shake of ours. What the deuce would I have 
got if you had lost?" 

"Why," said Fouga, "that's easy. You'd have got 
your picture." 

* * * 

Few people when they open the leaves of their morning 
paper comfortably ensconced in their seats at the break- 
fast table imagine the trials and tribulations that, beset 
the paths of the different newsgatherers whose labors of a 



day of exceeding hard work often result in little more 
than a short double headed paragraph. In the various 
large hotels which are the rendezvous for all classes and 
conditions of people from all parts and portions of the 
world are often buried stories which would make the for- 
tune of an energetic journalist who should be lucky enough 
to discover them in all their unique, tragic or bizarre de- 
tails. Once in a while some reporter going the rounds 
gets a faint hint of one of these hidden mysteries, and then 
finds his task beset by difficulties which would appall one 
who had been bred in a less tenacious profession. Not 
the least of these difficulties is the reticence that the 
scribe encounters when he endeavors to glean a little in- 
formation from the hotel officials. 

It seems to be a point of honor for every hotel manager 
to protect as far as lies in his power the privacy of his 
guests from the prying eyes of the representatives of the 
press. As the king so the people. This reticence ex- 
tends from the proprietor or manager of the hotel down 
to the lowest menials in its employ. The newspaper man 
may question until he is blue in the face without eliciting 
any reply more satisfactory than a denial of all knowledge 
of the occurrence or an evasive answer containing an 
apologetic reason that the hotel employee has to give for 
not being better able to comply with the wishes of his in- 
terlocuter. 

There is one clerk in particular who is known among 
the boys as a hard customer. He is a blonde Englishman 
who presides at the desk of a well-known caravansary. 
His employer has impressed upon him the necessity of 
knowing absolutely nothing about anything, and as to a 
man of his mentality such a task is one of comparative 
ease he obeys it to the letter. No matter what the time 
of day at which the reporter appears nor the matter upon 
which he interrogates him, this clerk has but one answer: 
"Really, my dear fellow, I would like to tell you, but you 
see 1 have just come on watch and I know nothing about 
the matter; however, I will send up and find out for you 
if you wish to wait." 

The other day three newspaper men representing dif- 
ferent morning papers entered this particular hotel to- 
gether. One of them, with a wink at his companions, 
said: "I'm going to put a question to our friend behind the 
desk, which I bet will startle him out of his sterotyped 
mode of answering us." 

Going up to the desk he approached the clerk and said: 
"How are you, old man, anything doing to-day ?" 

"No," replied the clerk, "nothing that I know of, have 
you got any news yourself ?" 

"You bet I have," replied the scribe, "and its right in 
your house here, too. My editor sent me down to ask you 
what disposition is to be made of the body of Jesse D. 
Carr, the Salinas capitalist, who committed suicide here 
this morning ?" 

At the time that question was put the plegmatic indi- 
vidual behind the desk was writing; at the conclusion of 
the query without for one moment stopping the progress 
of his pen over the paper or even as much as glancing up, 
he replied: "Really, old man, I have just come on watch 
and I know nothing whatever about the matter, but if you 
would like to go up and find out for yourself I will send 
your card." 

The reporter looked at him in amazement and said: 

"Why, I was only joshing you. Carr has not committed 
suicide, nor has any one else in your house." 

"No," said the man of rooms and bells, "but he may 
kill himself some time, and if he ever does I will be glad to 
tell you anything I know about it.'' 

* * # 

Two minds with but a single thought, 
Two hearts that beat as one; 
One pair of hands to earn the dough 
While tother spends the mon. 

* # * 

At one of our local hotels there is employed a young and 
beautiful daughter of Argentina, whose loveliness of face 
and figure alone wruld be enough to recommend her to the 
attention of all who know her, had she not an accomplish- 
ment which is as strange and peculiar as is the young 
lady herself dainty and fascinating. This accomplishment 
in anyone else would be merely a habit or a vice, as one 
might choose to consider it, but such is the grace and 



February 3. 1900. 



SAN J 1 ill; 



11 



delicacy she employs io pursuing it that it is raised to a 
dignity above mere v and becomes an art which 

is charming and interesting in its refined eccentricity It 
aiao has the merit to be so cheap that it is within the easy 
reach of any who desire to experiment with it. 

This eccentricity of the young iady is nothing more nor 
less than an appetite for illuminating gas. Her taste for 
this has become a mania, and the quantity which she is 
able to take without any perceptible effect is something 
that would cause the eyes of a physician to start from 
their sockets should he but witness her at one of her 
unique meals. Her failing is so well known to the other 
employes of the hotel that one or the other of them keeps 
an eye on the young lady, and whenever she disappears 
for a moment from her position, someone is sent out to 
trace her up and find out where she is. 

This search is generally conducted by the one sent after 
her going from gas-cock to gas-cock all over the house, 
and sooner or later his fair quest is sure to be discovered 
attached to one of the lighting apparatuses, inhaling the 
stuff for all she is worth. There is a cigar-lighter at- 
tached to the hotel desk, and whenever the little cbarmer 
gets an opportunity she will blow out the flame and take 
a few whiffs to tide her over for an hour or so, in much the 
same manner as a c lerk will leave his ledger occasionally 
to take two or three draws of a cigarette. 

The voung lady, when questioned upon her reason for 
this peculiar fad, says, in delightfully broken English, that 
she likes it because it does her no barm, while it makes 
her feel light ana pleasant, gives her happy thoughts, and 
makes pretty pictures dance before her eyes without in- 
terfering with her ability to attend to her work. 

No one knows how long she has pursued her curious 
passion; but from her evident enjoyment of it, and the 
quantity of gas she is able to take at one dose, it is 
patent that she has indulged in it for a long time. Her 
statement that it does her no physical injury is amply 
borne out by her appearance, which is that of a young 
girl in the very best of good health. While so far as injury 
to her mentality or her good looks is concerned, it is suffi- 
cient to talk to her for a few moments to be thoroughly 
convinced that whatever very harmful properties gas 
may contain, dullness can certainly not be considered 
among the disastrous effects of its use, and her beauty is 
a stronger argument in its favor than could possibly be 
contained in a treatise from the pen of the most learned 
of chemists. This fad is something new, but when it be- 
comes more widely known it may meet with such popular 
favor that a gas inhalation apparatus may in time super- 
sede the opium smoker's lay-out or the heavily doped 
cigarette. 

It is now up to one of our enterprising dailies to publish 
the young woman's picture, together with the signed con- 
fessions of a gas-eater. The only thing that may prevent 
is that the story is absolutely true. 



Well might I sing like Israfel, 

Standing upon some lambant star, 
Tuning my angel notes to swell 

Through listening satellites afar, 
Till hosts of tuneful cherubim 
To hear my song would cease to hymn — 
So might I sing. 

Why don't I sing like Israfel, 

That weird musician of the sky, 
To ravish men on earth who dwell 

And planets swinging in the sky? 
Well, if the truth you must be told, 
The fact is this : 1 have a cold 
And cannot sing. 
# # * 

Few more impressive sights have been witnessed since 
the war than the home-coming of the gallant Lawton. 
The naval parade, on the occasion of the return of the 
California volunteers was more spectacular, but its note 
was entirely joyous, the living, not the dead, were being 
welcomed. But the melancholy significance attaching to 
the Thomas's arrival seemed as it were, to send the whole 
water front into instant mourning. The afternoon was 
grey and sombre, as befitted the occasion, and as the 
great white transport, — or floating hearse, — her engines 
going dead slow, passed the long line of docks, every flag 



wag lower. hat lifted. The steamer's wl 

answered, in a m the minute guns which lv>omed 

solemnly across the water. And saddest of all the 1 
widow and orphaned children accompanied him on the 
funeral voyage. Surely no warrior was ever borne to his 
last resting place with more fittag state. 
• • • 

Vmericmn. 
You poor Sultan of Snlu, 
Don'l run for public office, for 
<Hir politics will fool you. 

Behold how Roberts got the axe 
The moral drawn thereof is: 
If you've a taste lor sixteen wives 
Don't run for public office. 



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THE MACMILLAN COMPANY, 

66 Fifth Avenue, New York. 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



February 3, 1900. 




The Nome fever is epidemic just now, and 
The Exodus to judging from indications, there will shortly 
Cape Nome. be an exodus from this city of thousands 
eager to take their chances in the latest 
El Dorado. The movement in this direction is one which 
merits encouragement. Unlike the hegira to the Klon- 
dike, there is nothing suggestive of the wolfish character- 
istics developed on that occasion, when the hunger for 
gold drove rich and poor into a wild, inhospitable region, 
the former using every means at command to make the 
goal at risk of life and limb, in a race where the weak, 
once down, couid rise no more. The world then had an 
exhibition of the sordid greed of humanity probably never 
witnessed before outside of a famine starved crew relieved 
of their necessities at death's door. The location of Cape 
Nome permits of emigration with facilities common to all 
inhabitable regions for the distribution of supplies of every 
kind. With due regard to the open season in the Arctic 
Ocean there need be no danger of starvation, even 
should thousands of people determine to winter there. 
Prom all that can be learned, the country is teeming with 
a wealth of gold open to discovery and extraction by peo- 
ple of moderate means, who will not, therefore, be forced 
into competition with some modern Croesus desirous of 
getting both head and shoulders into the trough. The 
region is sufficiently attractive in respect to chances for 
acquiring at least an honest livelihood by hard work, to 
relieve the congested labor markets of the West Coast, 
and transportation charges will be moderate enough be- 
fore the season is far advanced, with every possibility 
that decent vessels will be available, to the exclusion of 
the rotten hulks used to send so many unfortunate 
wretches to their death en route to some hell-hole along 
the upper reaches of the Yukon. Among other satis- 
factory arrangements just concluded for the expedition of 
commercial and private business in the northern territory, 
is the granting of a contract by the Government to the 
Alaska Commercial Company for the delivery of mail 
matter to Nome and all points along the river up to Daw- 
son. The selection of this old-established and responsible 
company will meet with the satisfaction of the public gen- 
erally, who have the fullest confidence in its management, 
that whatever it undertakes it will do well. 

We have not been favored this year 

Magalia Con. with a report of this company, which 

Gold Mines, Limited, now represents the main operations 

of the Golden Feather combination. 
This is rather unkind after the efforts upon our part 
to elucidate some facts about the concern in its earl- 
iest stages, which the management has eventually been 
forced to accept as correct after loss of time and the 
expenditure of considerable money. However, the philos- 
ophy of life ignores entirely the existence of gratitude 
among mortals, barring the happy belief of every-day 
fools, so no disappointment is occasioned by the omission, 
oversight, or whatever one may be pleased to term it. 
It is morally certain, however, that it will require a 
bonanza strike of extraordinary proportions to pull any of 
the original shareholders in this long-winded procession of 
reconstructed companies out even. The longer they go 
on, the deeper they have had to delve in their pockets. 

A light advance in Ophir was the sole fea- 
The Comstock ture of the week. The occasion was a little 
Share Market, demand for the stock in some quarters. 
This only goes to confirm what has been said 
in this column from time to time many weeks past, that 
some day investors will awaken to the fact that all the 
leading stocks are scarce in the brokers wallets, and they 
will have to bid up if they want them. Nothing new has 
transpired from the lode. More changes are going on at 
the pumping plant, where a steel lined throat is about to 
be put in elevator No. 1, which it is hoped will make it as 
effective as No. 2. Assessments are being paid up well 
and the liabilities of the companies for the cheap power- 
plant will be ended during the forthcoming week. The 
final payment on the pump plant will not be due for some 
time to come. 



It may not be generally known thatadia- 

The Light mond was found at Kimberley shortly before 

of Kimberley. tbe war broke out which is said to surpass 

both as regards size and brilliancy the 
Regent, the Shah, the Grand Mogul and the Koh-i-noor. 
The name of it is the "Light of Kimberley," a very appro- 
priate one, especially as the stone will be used to adver- 
tise the great African industry at the forthcoming Paris 
Exhibition. It is insured for £400,000, and will be guarded 
by four policemen when placed upon exhibition, the show- 
case sinking into the ground at night in the same way as 
that in which the Regent is kept at the Louvre. Speak- 
ing about diamonds, there is reason to hope that the ex- 
ploration now going on in Central California may yet re- 
veal tbe existence of these precious stones. An expert 
miner of this class from South Africa of large means 
prosecuted a still hunt for diamond-bearing gravel some 
years ago, and was very sanguine of success when he died 
suddenly from an attack of pneumonia. His name was T. Day 
Atkins. He had cleaned up a large fortune in the Kimberley 
fields before he was attracted toward California, which 
be considered after a close investigation of many months 
one of tbe most promising localities he had ever visited 
for important discoveries of the kind. The trouble is that but 
few of the men operating on the field at present can know 
anything about mining for diamonds or the appearance of 
the stones in the rough until after they have had some 
practical experience. 

A London financial exchange, in comment- 
That Annual ing upon American gold production, credits 
Gold Yield. a large proportion of the Northern yield to 

the "United States Klondike territory." It 
wou.d be interesting to learn whereabouts this district is 
located on the map. To say that the millions accredited 
to the Klondike for the year were calculated from receipts 
at United States mints and assay offices would be more 
correct possibly. This in turn raises a new issue, which 
our statisticians might answer, if not too haughty to 
notice conundrums propounded outside of their peculiarly 
exclusive official circle: Does all the Klondike gold pro- 
duced come into the United States, and if so, why the 
everlasting howl about British aggression and tyranny in 
this quarter of the globe? If this amount is duplicated 
by as much more gold shown up upon the records of 
Canada, why not give Colorado an official tap on the 
sconce, instead of California, in the question of prior 
rank in the annual yield of gold. 

The latest report from the Peerless Oil Com- 
The Peerless pany's ground is that the perforation of the 
oil Reserves, casing in No. 2 well opposite the oil sand has 
been completed, whereupon the oil rose in the 
well 527 feet, or to a point within 200 feet of the surface. 
These are the true facts of the case. The well is not a 
flowing one, and it is further stated that such a thing is 
unknown in the Kern River district. Tests are now be- 
ing made of the oil which is obtained from well No. 2 by 
the bailing process, no pump having as yet been installed. 
It is believed, however, that this well will produce at least 
fifty barrels per day. The superintendent has been in- 
structed to at once proceed drilling No. 3 well, and it is 
expected work will begin next Monday. 

The Devil's Den Oil Company has just 
Consolidated Devil's been formed with a capital of $103,000 
Den Oil Belt. at Visalia for the purpose of consoli- 
dating 2020 acres of oil land, probably 
the best in tbio portion of the State. The consolidation 
includes sections 20, 21, 22, 23, 25, 26, and 27, in Township 
25 South, Range 18 East, M. D. M. The contributing 
companies are as follows: Oakland Oil and Asphaltum 
Co. ; Visalia Oil Co. ; Hess & Co. ; Lucier & Luhdorff; 
Niagara Oil Co. ; Henrich & Co. ; Sunflower Oil Co. ; and 
Cove Oil Co., all in the famous Devil's Den Oil Belt. It is 
likely that a still further consolidation will shortly take 
place of Sections 19, 30, 29, 28, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, and 36, 
in the same township. 

S STRIKE of oil is reported by the Gray Eagle Oil 
Company at a depth of 726 feet. This well has been 
capped and the drilling of the three more has been started 
on the same section — section 30, T 28, R 28. They struck 
oil on the 26th ult. When boring was stopped the oil 
sand quit coming in, and nothing but pure oiljis now flow 
ing, lighter in character than most of the oil in this district. 



February 3, 1900. 



1 III: 



13 



FOLLOWING are the transactions on the Stock 
Bond Exchange for the week beginning January 
and ending February 1st : 

MVrKLLAXKOPH BONIW 



and 

L'f.th 



Ln« An f P». 

<>or*nic Boml* V. .*>.,. 
Oakland Om ! 



»<TH. »!i»tr. 

f'onlr* Cost* Water, .hoi 
Mprliuj V idler Water. 271 
0*» ajtd Kljk-trii . 
Equitable Om 
Mutual Qeclri. 
Oakland ( )«■ 
Pacific Oaa ImpVnL 22T, 






Oakland Tr..n«ll ' 
Pari. 

•• 

B V u u • 

.. B00I1 

l.'at SroAB Stocks. Hharr*. 

72 liana P Co 

i.akaa. 

Hntahliuon lis 

I Makawrli 

■ I- i. 185 

4 M Paauhau S PI Co 
47*4 Powdkrs. 



113 
IIOH 



-•:', 



Pacific UchlitiK r. i\H Mediant (MO 

Ga» and Electric. WO 51', .•»•', VlnorM 200 

« I'. M, 



M P(lH 

Ban*. 

Bank of California. ... U ml 
California Safo Dcpi«t 40 98S 

STMCT KAIt.ROAD*. 

Market Street 210 61 



i.l 



I l.ASEOCB. 

Alaska Paokers ED ISO 

Oceanic S S Co .115 V?,i 

Fireman* Fund 10 937 

Pacific Coast Borax... 60 III 

Pacific Auxiliary 200 2 



3 

si 

tUM 



The transactions for the week amount to 7,149 shares and .VI.500 bonds as 
against 7.?i'» shares and W.000 bonds of the previous week. 

■. Blecirio stock sold between 51Va and oOli. On Tuesday Contra 
Costa sold down to 72, recovering t 

Bonds have been lightly traded in at prices ruling somewhat lower than a 
lew weeks ago. when the trading in same was very heavy. 



I'm.vjc Mil uirii's Extra Dry and you are drinking the finest and 
most popular champagne in the market. 109.303 cases of this wine 
were imported in the year 1899— just 72.495 cases more than any other 
brand. The vintage of 1895 a splendid one, is now on sale. 

One application of Smith's Dandruff Pomade stops itching scalp ; 
three to six applications removes all dandrutT. Try it. Price 50 
cents, at all druggists. 8ample free. Address Smith Brothers. 
Fresno, Oal. 



"Winter flowers are the pride and glory of California, and they 
are always to be found in great beauty and variety at Leopold's, the 
Post street flower house. Leopold's roses and violets are exceptional 
this season. 



Home Dining Parlor, 301Jones street. Meals, 15 cents. Chicken dinner 
Sunday, 25 cents. Genuine home cooking. Give us a call. 



Tiheir credit, he it said, Japs are recular whales at 
bathing, and usually when not drinking tea are bath- 
ing. Their only trouble in life seems to be their inability 
to enjoy both these delights at the same time. If some 
American trick swimmer could teach the Japs how to 
swallow tea out of a bottle while under water, they would 
build a tin temple round him, burn incense made of old 
rags and bones under his nose, and worship him. Public 
baths are numerous, in which "mixed bathing" was prac- 
ticed until lately; but now a bamboo fence separates the 
sexes, though it does not screen them from view, the 
fence being only two feet high in bath houses in the in- 
terior of Japan. Some houses have a wooden bathtub, 
circular in shape, with a stove built in one end, which 
beats the water. The whole family, beginning with the 
father, bathe in the same water. Sometimes women 
"tub" themselves and their children outside their doors in 
the streets where sidewalks should be. The 6rst time a 
foreigner falls over one of these bathing parties and into 
the arms of the bather, he feels that the situation is 
unique, but by tbe time he has tumbled over half a dozen 
he tires of the fun, rubs his shins, and makes some very 
uncomplimentary comments, while the polite little woman 
underneath squeaks out, "Sayonara." (Sir, please call 
again), etc. 

A restaurant that has its own distinct atmosphere and is known 
the country over for the excellence of its cooking and the quiet 
efficiency of its service is Swain's Bakery in Sutter street. For 
twenty years and more this restaurant has enjoyed an exclusive 
patronage. It has a character that is decidedly its own. OrJers are 
taken for breads, pastries, ices, chicken sandwiches, etc. 



There is nothing so dangerous to health and comfort as an un- 
clean carpet. Many people delay having their carpets cleaned be- 
cause they dread the trouble and the delay. The Spaulding Carpet 
Cleaning Works, 353 Tehama street does away with all this by using 
special machinery and employing expert workmen. Quick work and 
easy prices. 

If you want an exquisite luncheon, dinner or breakfast served and 
cooked in real Parisian style go to the Maison Riche at the corner of 
Grant avenue and Geary street The Riche has long been known as 
the epicure's paradise. It's name is a familiar one to the good livers 
of the world. 



Giant 
Oil 



Location of wells: 
McKITTRICK, Kern County, Cal 



Company Capitalization $500,000 

600 Acres of Land, U. S. Patent, in the heart of the 
now famous McKittrick District, selected by experts 
and proven to be one of the best Oil-producing prop- 
erties in the State. 



Wm, J. DINGEE, 

President. 



J. M. MERRELL, 

Vice-President. 



OFFICES : 
Rooms ls-16, Second Floor, Mills Building, S. F. 460-462 Eighth Street, Oakland, California. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 3, 1900. 



NSURANOE. 



IT is the News Letter's pleasure to chronicle the failure 
of another assessment fraternal "insurance" organiza- 
tion, that of the Independent Order of Foresters. This 
institution commenced business in June, 1874. was incor- 
porated February 2, 1882, and on Tuesday, the 29th ult., 
through its chief official, Charles G. Jones, applied 1o 
Judge Tuttle of Chicago for a receiver to wind up its 
affairs. This fraternal beneficiary organization bad sub- 
ordinate branches through Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan 
California and other States, and was sued by the widow of 
one of its beneficiaries, Kalacky, and judgment was ren- 
dered in her favor for $1,000, together with interest Her 
attorneys immediately garnisheed the funds of the concern 
and tied them up. The "High Chief Ranger" and the 
"High Secretary," and the "high" this, that and the 
other were hurriedly summoned, and it was decided to 
apply for a receiver. The Royal Trust Company of Chi- 
cago was appointed to collect and take charge of the bills, 
contracts, money and other property, subject to the 
further order of the court. 

The Foresters have been in existence for over a quarter 
of a century, and have been held up as a pattern of one of 
the most successful, solid and solvent of fraternal organ- 
izations which granted insurance. The l3st authoritative 
figures obtainable show that at the close of business in 
1898 the Foresters had over 15,000 policies in force, with 
an amount at risk of $14,357,000; that it had a total in- 
come during the year of $233,399.44; and that it paid for 
death and permanent disability claims in that year 
$211,200; and that it had a balance of cash in bank of 
$7,426.80, together with assessments collected by lodges 
but not turned over of $16,135.48, making the total assets 
at the close of business in 1898 $24,062.28. These figures 
are from the sworn report of the high court of the Inde- 
pendent Order of Foresters made to the Insurance Com- 
missioner of the State of Illinois. A further examination 
of the figures reveals the fact that the salaries and offi- 
cers with their total compensation amounts to the small 
sum of $4,630.83. The rents and advertising, $2,240; other 
expenses, $10,440; or in round figures the total expended 
in management of the organization amounts to $17,311, a 
not extravagant sum for an institution doing a business of 
the magnitude of almost $236,000 income per year. It is 
evident, therefore, that the cause of the failure of this in- 
stitution cannot be attributed to extravagant manage- 
ment on the part of its officers, or exorbitant salaries and 
reckless expenditure of its money. The root of the evil is 
deeper than this, which is only too commonly the cause of 
the destruction of this class of organizations. It is to be 
found in the inevitable law which comes to institutions of 
this character after a period of existence where the 
natural average of death losses are encountered. The in- 
creased death loss, which comes inevitably with the in- 
creased age of the policy holder, must as surely disrupt 
and bankrupt an institution founded on these principles 
as that daylight will follow dawn. This is not the first 
warning by a large number that the News Letter has 
given to its readers on the fallacy of this plan of protec- 
tion. It is a misnomer to call it life insurance. The sad- 
dest part is not the loss of money by the victims who have 
patronized such a scheme, but the suffering that follows 

upon those left to the pitiless charity of the cold world 

the widow and orphans who had rested secure upon the 
expectation of deriving sufficient to protect them from 
the so-called insurance, which they had probably denied 
themselves the necessaries of life in order to pay for. It 
would be easy for the News Letter to chronicle the fail- 
ure of like institutions on the average of one a week, some 
of smaller weight and little moment, and others of larger 
and more extended growth; but when an order as widely 
known and advertised as the Independent Order of For- 
esters is forced into bankruptcy through an adverse judg- 
ment of $1,000 and interest, reporting the business which 
it swore to, to the Insurance Commissioner of the State 
of Illinois, it becomes a matter worthy of note. 

It seems that the New Zealand Insurance Company of 
Auckland, W. P. Thomas, Pacific Coast manager is some 
thing of a dividend earner. A cablegram from Auckland 



dated January 10th, states that after providing for all 
ascertained losses, a dividend has been declared at the 
rate of 10 per cent, per annum for the half year ended 
November 30th last. The business of the New Zealand on 
the Coast increased last year almost $18,000, and the 
average ratio for the past three years has been 53.3 per 
cent. 

Geo. F. Grant is out of town. 

In the second part of the paragraph referring to the 
Union Central Life, published in the last issue of the News 
Letter, a typographical error made it read "The Union 
Mutual is still without a general agent." It should have 
read: "The Union Central, etc." The mistake did not do 
any injury, for everyone knows W. C. Leavitt is the gen- 
eral agent of the Union Mutual. 

Vice-President Hobart is said to have carried $100,000 
on his life in the Equitable and $35,000 in the New York 
Life. Both of these companies are said to have sent 
drafts for the amounts the next day after the funeral. 
Aside from these two policies, enough other life insurance 
was carried to make the total $350,000. 

The Glens Falls Insurance Company received its license 
after giving to Insurance Commissioner Clunie the same 
stipulation he required from the Phoenix of Brooklyn, 
with regard to the payment of the taxes, which Mr. Clunie 
says are due. 

As illustrative of the method taken by the English life 
insurance companies witb'regard to the insurance on the 
lives of British soldiers in service in Africa, the Sun Life 
has adopted a rule, as follows: Policies will be granted to 
those selected for foreign service in South Africa subject 
only to completion of the short term of proposal (of which 
a form is provided), and without medical examination or 
the usual references. In addition to the ordinary premium 
and extra of £7 7s. per cent, for each year, or part of a 
year, of service during the campaign will be required. 
The Credit Insurance Company announces that it is pre- 
pared to issue policies to volunteers taking part in the 
South African campaign, against fatal accidents, includ- 
ing war risk, for amounts of £50 or £100, at premiums of 
£2 10s. or £5, respectively. The insurance will come into 
force from date of payment of premium, and hold good for 
a period of twelve months, or until the end of the cam- 
paign, whichever shall first happen. 

The Pacific Surety Company wrote 
California Business in premiums $864.59, with losses of 
In Plate Glass. $383.50. 

The Frankfort wrote $3,364.88, 
with losses of $1,766.47. 
The Maryland Casualty wrote $133.40 in premiums. 
The Fidelity and Casualty wrote $2,705 56 in premiums,, 
with $614.95 in losses. 

The Lloyds Plate Glass wrote $2,204.92 in premiums, 
with $748.38 in losses. 

The New York Plate Glass wrote $6,327.19 in premiums, 
with $3,256.31 in losses. 

The Metropolitan Plate Glass wrote $2,022.41 in prem- 
iums, with $1,120.98 in losses. 

The Pacific Surety wrote $4,588.25. 
Steam Boiler The Maryland Casualty wrote $617.75, with 
Insurance. $195 in losses. 

The Frankfort American wrote $835 in 
premiums. 
The Fidelity and Casualty wrote $2,809.15 in premiums. 
The Hartford Steam Boiler wrote $14,933.89 in prem- 
iums, with $405 in losses. 



w//ia< 



UKft 




w 




LONDON ASSURANCE. 



OCEAN MARINE. 



Capital Subscribed $4,462 , 750 

Capital Paid Up 2,24-1,375 

Assets 19,196,146 

Capital Subscribed $6,000,000 

Capital Paid Up 600,000 

Assets 2,602,060 



February 3, 1900. 



SAN : NEWS LETTKh. 



«5 



The American Surety wrote t33,487.31 in 
Fidelity premiums, with ♦♦> 228 26 in losses. 
ln»ur.nce. The Fidelity and Deposit wrote *.t!U26.06 
in premiums, with 18,779 43 in losses, 
ted States FidcHiv and Guarantee wrote 
:. premiums, with *3. 4'. 1 "" .13 in losses. 
The Pacific Surety wrote 130,081 M in premiums, with 
14,419.63 in losses. 

The Employers' Liability wrote $727.50 in premiums. 
The Fidelity and Casualty wrote (3.934.65 in premiums. 
National Surety wrote 130,786.07 in premiums, with 
11,887.16 in losses. 

The Standard wrote (2.3 IV 94 in premiums, 
Liability with (1,785. 33 in losses. 
Inturnnce. The Employers' Liability wrote $55, 977.67 

in premiums, with (21,026 54 in losses. 
The Frankfort wrote (62,079.95 in premiums, with 
183,318 :'l in losses. 

The London Guarantee wrote (7,354.73 in premiums, 
with (2, 121. So in losses. 

The Maryland Casualty wrote (10,083.51 in premiums, 
with (426.67 in losses. 
The New Amsterdam wrote (2,539.65 in premiums. 
The Fidelity and Casualty wrote (10,540.48 in premiums, 
with (3,201.10 in losses. 

The New Amsterdam wrote $444 in 

Burqlar Insurance. 

" ■ premiums. 

The Fidelity and Casualty wrote (5,467.88 in premiums, 
with (466 in losses. 



1 met a prelate employed in the Vatican the other 

day, and in the course of our conversation began to de- 
plore my hard lot in having to stay in Rome during the 
heat of the summer and work. "Oh, well," he said, "you 
are not worse than we are in the Vatican. Now that most 
of the employees are away we who are left have to work 
hard." "Work I " I exclaimed. "Yes, walk in the Vati- 
can gardens and count the grapes of the pope's vineyardl" 
"Do you know that every evening the mail brings to the 
bronze doors of the Vatican an average of 20,000 letters 
and newspapers, to say nothing of telegrams? All the 
the letters have to be opened, sorted, and classified, 
while the newspapers are read and selections cut or ex- 
tracts made during the night to be ready for perusal by 
the officers of state early the next morning." "And where 
does the pope come in?" I interrupted. "They say he 
works so hard?" "Much of this work is submitted to him 
and he should read all the letters addressed "Sanctitati 
Suae Leoni Papae XIII, feliciter regnanti.' However, as 
the whole twenty-four hours of the day would not be enough 
for the pontiff to even glance over them, he only sees what 
Cardinal Eampolla thinks necessary for his inspection. " 
"In other words, he knows only what they choose?" "Oh, 
no; there are communications which really go direct to 
the holy father, namely, those through the diplomatists 
accredited to the Vatican. Still, the most secure way of 
having a letter read by the pope is to address it as fol- 
lows: "To his holiness the pope, prefect of the holy Roman 
and universal inquisition," as any other than the head of 
the church guilty of opening a document so addressed will 
be excommunicated, according to a bull promulgated by 
the Carafa pope, Pau l IV."— Pall Mall G azette. 

THE "OVERLAND LIMITED " -A Solid Vestibuled Train 
Via the UNION PACIFIC leaves San Franoiaco daily at 8.00 a. m. 
Breakfast served in dining Car. 

Three days to Chicago without change. One day quicker than 
any other line. 

Finest modern Pullman equipment, including library and bullet 
cars and dining cars, a la carte. D. W. Hitchcock, No. 1 Mont 
gomery street, San Francisco. 

If theee is anything in this world that a man ought to be particular 
aboat it is tbe whiskey he drinks. Bad whiskey is the root of most 
crime. Drink the J . F. Cutter and Argonaut brands and be sure 
that you are right. All whiskey is good, but be sure that you are 
getting whiskey. The J. F. Cutter and Argonaut brands are the real 
thing. E. Martin & Co., 411 Market street, sole agents. 

No man glories in the fact that he is bald ; take warning in time if 
your scalp itches, it is just a reminder that you will sooner or later 
become bald. Use Smith's Dandruff Pomade, the only positive cure 
for itching scalp. 

Allen's Peess Clipping Btjeeau, 510 Montgomery street, San Pranolsco. 
deals in all kinds of newspaper information, business, personal, political 
from press of State, coast and country. Tel. Main 1042. 



INSURANCE 



FIRE, MARINE. AND INLAND INSURANCE 

FIREMAMS FUND 

INSURANCE COMPANY OF SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

Capital, $1,000,000 Assets, $3,500,000 



PALATINE 



INSURANCE COMPANY (Limited) OF MANCHESTER ENGLAND 

SOLID SECURITY OVER $9,000,000 RESOURCES 

CHAS. A. LATON. Manager. 439 California street. .«. F. 
FIRE INSURANCE 



Founded A. D. 1792 



r. 



nsurance wompany 



ny of North A 



merica 



OF PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 

Paid-up Capital $3,000,000 

Surplus to Policy Holders (£022.016 

JAMES D. BAILEY, General Agent. 412 California street. S. F. 

Royal Exchange Assurance, of London 

Incorporated by Royal Charter. A. D. 1720 

Capital Paid Up, $3,446,100 Assets. 924,034,110.36 

Surplus to Policy Holders. $9,612. 45r>.% 

FRANK W. DICKSON. Manager 

501-503 Montgomery street, corner Sacramento 

FIRE, MARINE, AND INLAND INSURANCE. 

Mew Zealand Insurance Gompany 

of New Zealand 
Capital. $6,000,000 UNLIMITED LIABILITY OF SHAREHOLDERS 

Office in company's building, 312 California street 

W. P. THOMAS, Manager 
Hooker & Lent, City Agents, 14 Post street 

Phoenix Assurance Co., of London 

Established 1782 

Providence-Washington Insurance Company 

Incorporated 1799 



BUTLER & HALDAN. General Agents 



413 California street, S. F. 



Gonnecticut Fire Insurance Go 

OF HARTFORD 

Cash Capital 81,000,000.00 

Cash Assets 3,869,451.75 

Surplus to Policy Holders 2,068,839.71 

BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager 
COLIN M. BOYD, San Francisco agent, 411 California street. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 

(Limited) OF LIVERPOOL 

Capital $6,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents 316 California street, S. F. 

The Thuringia Insurance Gompany 

of ERFURT. GERMANY 
Capital, 82,250,000 Assets 810,984,248 

VOSS, CONRAD & CO., General Managers 
Pacific Coast Department: 204-208 Sansome street, S. F. 

North German Fire Insurance Company 

of' Hamburg, Germany 
N. SCHLESINGER, City Agent 304 Montgromery street San Francisoo 

Western Mutual Investment Co. Teh Main lm 

$2 Per Month 
415-416 Safe Deposit Building. Montgomery and California streets. San 
Francisoo. Agents Wanted, 



i6 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 3, 11,00. 




PERSONALIS 



" How far that little candle throws his beams I 
80 shines a good deed in a naughty world." 

— Merchant of Venice. 

So sang Shakespeare more than three centuries ago. 
Ever since and for centuries prior to the time of the bard 
of Avon, candles have played a conspicuous part in the 
world's civilization. Ancient religious rites and customs 
in which the waxeu tapers figured largely have come down 
to us — their use somewhat modified, perhaps, but still in- 
dispensable in Roman and Episcopal services. 

As we come down the century we find wax lights were 
indispensable accompaniments to the adornments of the 
royal palace, feudal castle, baronial hall, and colonial 
mansion of ye olden time; and now, at the dawn of the 
twentieth century, a full flood of soft mellow light from 
thousands of beautiful waxen tapers falls upon thousands 
of American homes by the adoption of the charming fancy 
for burning wax candles for decorative purposes for the 
many social functions for which modern society is responsi- 
ble. From the formal dinner, the five o'clock tea, and 
progressive euchre, to the most pretentious banquet, the 
dainty wax candle has displaced the more lurid illumina- 
tion of gas, electric light and lamp. The decorative 
possibilities of these soft-tinted lights are unlimited — hand- 
painted candles in miniature candelabra or brass candle- 
sticks prove dainty and acceptable prizes for the pro- 
gressive euchre. 

In the decoration of candles for house and table, the 
color scheme of each particular room may be successfully 
carried out in shades made of thin silk or tissue paper; 
the latter is especially adapted to the shade idea — floral 
and conventional designs seem to grow under the deft 
touch of expert fingers until we find the most exquisite 
bits of artistic beauty so closely simulating the natural 
flowers that only the perfume is lacking to perfect the 
delusion. 

Probably one of the prettiest effects obtained in the use 
of wax tapers is brought about in the revival of an old- 
time custom of decorating the birthday cake with them. 
Just when or bow this custom originated, deponent saith 
not; possibly its origin might be traced to some super- 
stitious belief in the power of lighted candle to bring 
"good luck;"but notwithstanding the uncertainty of origin, 
there is one existing certainty, and that is there is no 
similar existing performance possessing half the charm 
and interest to the little folk as this particular feature of 
the birthday party. 

Upon serving refreshments for such an anniversary 
festivity, the birthday cake is placed in the centre of the 
table and in size is proportionate to number of candles — 
to be placed upright in the icing; the number of candles 
must tally with number of birthday anniversaries the 
little host or hostess may have passed. 

The candles having been burning during the feast, at a 
signal all the little guests are expected to blow! The 
trick being to blow out as many of the lighted tapers as 
possible, the person extinguishing the greatest number is 
declared the champion blower of the occasion, receiving 
some prize or mark of honor proclaiming who is victor. 
If the table be round, thus placing all equi-distant from 
the illuminated cake, the interest and fairness of the con- 
test is much greater. The eagerness, the comical puck- 
ering of each little mouth, not to mention the vehement 
explosion from dozens of rosy lips, prove quite as interest- 
ing to "children grown tall," as to the "little men and 
women" 'round the board. 

The delicate paraffine candles having neither grease nor 
disagreeable odor, the cake has received no injury what- 
ever in having thus been utilized as a candelabrum, and is 
finally cut and served as the piece de resistance of the 
occasion. 



Julian Ralph tells of his delight in finding green corn 

in Europe. In the course of many years of extensive 
travel on the continent he had never seen an ear. He 
recently stopped at a hotel in Paris and met a porter in 
the hall carrying a basket of genuine American green 
corn. "Green corn!" he shouted. "Is it possible that 
this is what I see?" "Yes, monsieur," said Mme. Brunei, 
the wife of the proprietor. "It is veritably the green 
corn of America. We grow it upon our farm. So many 
of our guests are Americans and so fond of this peculiar 
food that we have seen it to be to our advantage to make 
for them this singular product in our fields in the country." 
"I took Mme. Brunei's hand," says Mr. Ralph, "and 
pressed it. I raised my hand as one does who bestows a 
benediction, 'God bless you, madam,' said I, with such 
evident piety that she could not take offense. 'You are 
the most magnificent and the most wonderful woman in 
France.' " — New York Tribune. 

A process of considerable interest is being carried 

on in Vienna with regard to some jewels purchased from 
a Paris jeweler of the name of Hartog, to the value of 
some 381,500f., by the Princess Louise of Coburg. The 
trinkets were bought by Lieutenant Keglevitch, who in 
payment gave two notes .of hand purporting to be signed 
by the Princess. The jewels were immediately pawned; 
and the jeweler has neither been able to get one half- 
penny of his money, nor has he been able to get back his 
property. As the Princess is in an institute, and is gen- 
erally said not to be in her right mind, it is not easy to 
prove that she really signed the notes of hand given by 
the lieutenant to the jeweler; and as the officer has been 
sent to prison what he says does not make much impres- 
sion. 

Gerhart Hauptmann, the young German dramatist, 

the subject of an interesting article in the February issue 
of East and West, bids fair to become quite familar before 
very long to the American public. "Hannele" was given 
in New York several years ago, and this season Mr. E. H. 
Sothern is producing a translation of Hauptmann's 
curious allegorical drama, "Die Versunkene Glocke,"— 
"The Sunken Bell." The essay in "East and West," 
analyzes the most important of Hauptmann's plays and 
discusses their ethical and artistic significance. 

AT the Osteopathic Institute, 204 Sutter street, Drs. 
A. C. Moore and J. F. Haney make a specialty of 
treating chronic diseases and deformities. Osteopathy is 
the most recent of medical creeds, and already has a 
large following. The hours at the Institute include from 
7 to 8 p. m., for the accommodation of those unable to call 
during the day. 

An excellent commercial lunch is served daily by Fay & Foster at 
the Grand Hotel Cafe. The cooking is notably good and the service 
by trained colored waiters is careful and quiet. The quality of the 
beverages served from the Grand Hotel Bar needs no bush. 



Do you know that Smith's Dandruff Pomade has cured thousands 
of cases of dandruff, itching scalp, eczema and falling hair when all 
other remedies have failed ? Price 50c at all druggists. Sample Free. 
Address Smith Bros., Fresno, Cal. 



Ladies do not have to wear switches to cover np their defects if 
they use Smith's Dandruff Pomade in time, it cures dandruff, itch- 
ing scalp, stops falling hair and makes hair grow. Price 50c at all 
drngtrista. 

Liquid Cosmetics being: considered so much more suitable to any com- 
plexion, the beneficial effects upon the skin, together with its absolute free- 
dom from any poisonous ingredients, make Creme de Lis the one perfect 
liquid cosmetic. 

Samuel M. Shortridge, Atty-at-Law 

Crocker Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

Dr. Charles W. Decker, Dentist 



Phelan Building; Rooms 6, 8, 10. 



Entrance 806 Market street 



Weak Men and Women 



Should use Damiana Bitters, 
the great Mexican remedy; 

it gives health and strength to the Sexual Organs. Depot at S23 Market 

street. San Francisco. Send tor circular. 



February 3, 1900. 



BAN FRANi [S< NEWS I I Till; 



»7 



B. ROBERTS PASSANT. 

F\\t*\ fn«nd, »o joo'rethp wurlil «i last. 
Sot alTonr fret, indeed, but round your rarv 
By J' irauof In««o»- lik* the blast 

Of wind* in latter winter] It appears 
To the unwhipt observer that your caste 
Has suffered. Well, one way you're safe from sneers; 
You're orthodox: no Doctor "f Pivinity 
(an i|uestion your devotion to the Trinity. 

In Switzerland. I think, it takes three woman 

To be accredited in courts of law ; 

A rale applied a little more to trim in 

The sex's (purely local) lack of awe 

For accuracy, but the scheme looks grim in 

The eyes of this emancipated shore; 

I wonder, though, if your deep plan could be 

To multiply one vow of faith by three. 

Yonr wives arc plural, Roberts, but your taste 
Is singular; 'tis odd, but most who break 
The canon laws in gaiety and baste 
Are foremost in calamity to take 
A refuge in the shield they have defaced. 
'Tis true a proper Congressman you make 
On paper, but, tut tut. man— right aboutl 
When seven millions ask you to get out. 

You've found a strange, gray goddess, friend, to pay 
Yonr tithe of pleasant vice to. I once saw 
A decent fellow fished up from the bay 
And all for one love: you have three or more. 
Oad, what a choice I With all the lures of play, 
Of fashion, frippery and fates of war — 
When powder, politics, red wine and revel, 
Gay girls and merry matrons play the devil. 
To think that yon should go in for polygamy. 
That vice to modest gentlemen accurst I 
If any gowned grammarian can figure me 
A deeper damned superlative than worst, 
You're that. Beside, your action sounds in bigamy, 
And then, it seems, you've never asked Will Hearst 
To seat you in the lower House: — the Senate 
Belongs exclusively to Gordon Bennett. 
Son Francisco, February 3, 1900. Edwin Coolidqe. 



KIPLING'S SECRET. 



THE difficulty with journalism is not that it deals with 
passing things, but that it deals with them in a pass- 
ing way, says Gerald Stanley Lee in the February At- 
lantic. Kipling is an artist because he respects the 
passing thing, because he catches the glimmer of the 
eternal joy upon it and will not let it pass. It is not in 
spite of being a reporter that J. M. Barrie is an artist, 
but it is because he is so much more of a reporter that he 
can report an out-of-the-way town like Thrums, and make 
it as famous as London. The world will look through a 
window anywhere, if it belongs to a man who sees things 
from it. The real difference between Barrie and the host 
of journalists to which he belongs is not that he could 
make Thrums as famous as London, but that he 
wanted to. No one else would have thought that Thrums 
would pay. Barrie did not. He delighted in it. Nine 
reporters out of ten, once finding themselves in Kipling's 
place, would have been too worldly wise to have written 
as Kipling did. Who would have supposed that the whole 
civilized world from its great complacent continents would 
ever come pouring out in crowds to the jungles of India? 
It was because Kipling delighted in the jungle, could not 
help writing about it, whether anybody wanted it or not, 
that we find the whole reading world to-day crowding 
jungleward across the seas, spending its time in that 
fever-stricken district, that Indian-haunted, Mulvaney- 
memoried wilderness, as if it blossomed as the rose. "No- 
body cares about this jungle of yours. Why don't you 
write on something that people care to read about?" said 
the English publisher distinguished for rejecting Mr. 
Kipling's work. Mr. Kipling's secret is that he took hold 
of something that nobody wanted him to do, and did it 
better than any one wanted him to do it. He owes his 
success to the fact that he has never done anything ex- 
cept to please himself, and he holds it because no one can 
get him to do it now. 

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case so different from that of tin- millions of 
women that are being helped by Pearline? 
Isn't " washing without rubbing " worth look- 
ing into? 571 



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i8 



SAN FKANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



February 3, igoo. 



CAPTAIN 5TAINTON. V. C. 



CAPTAIN Stainton, V. C, had 
been duly feted by his friends and 
acquaintances and brother-officers. 
It had been a short campaign, and of 
all the men who had won distinction 
in it, perhaps no one had so much 
cause to congratulate himself as 
Captain Stainton. 

Yet, truth to tell, he was not 
happy, and under the apparent cir- 
cumstances this was strange. 

" You do not know how proud I am 
of you, Cuthbert," said the girl, sit- 
ting in an easy attitude before the 
fire. She said it calmly, not enthusi- 
astically, as some women would have 
done, but then Edith Trevanyon was 
not as other women. 

"People make too much of these 
things," answered the captain. "They 
are performed in the heat of the mo- 
ment and are not so heroic as is be- 
lieved. I was absolutely astounded 
when I found that I had been recom- 
mended for the Cross." 

"Will you think me very unkind 
when I say that I was astonished to 
hear that you had got it?" 

" No. You are not the first to ex- 
press surprise." 

"I have always looked upon you as 
such a lazy individual, Cuthbert. To 
find you at the right place at the 
right moment is astonishing. Still, it 
is rather pleasant to know that I am 
going to marry a hero." 

" My dear Edith, don't make any 
mistake. Because a man plays a 
man's part for ten minutes in his life, 
he is not necessarily a hero. I am not 
one I assure you." 

They had been alone in the room, 
now others entered and their tUe-6. 
tete ended. 

Edith Trevanyon had been the 
reigning beauty of two seasons, and 
when her engagement to Cuthbert 
Stainton was announced, people 
wondered somewhat. 

His family boasted a peer at the 
head of it, but the captain was by no 
means a wealthy man, and his chance 
of coming into the title was of the 
remotest kind possible. 

True Edith Trevanyon had money. ■' 
So it was generally considered that 
Captain Stainton was a lucky nian^- 
and a wise one, too, his friends took 
occasion to add. 

Still Cuthbert Stainton was not 
happy. On leaving his fiancee he 
walked back to his chambers, his 
brow puckered with thoughts. 

"It's got to be done, and I'm 
hanged if I wouldn't rather face those 
yelling devils a dozen times than do 
it." 

( |He sat down at his writing-table, 
lit a cigar, and took up his pen. His 
sword had been ready enough a few 
weeks ago, his pen just now seemed a 
somewhat useless implement. He 
scribbled a few lines on several sheets 
of notepaper, only to tear each sheet 
up in turn. 

He became very conscious of the 
fact that he was not a hero, more 
conscious of it than when he had made 



tne statement to Edith Trevanyon. 

Before he had left England there 
had been two farewells: One, calm, 
matter-of-fact, in a luxurious room — 
a God-speed which had much friend- 
ship in it, but which could smile at 
the suggestion that it might be a last 
parting; the other, loving and tear- 
ful, a sweet white face hidden upon 
his breast, a trembling woman's form 
in his arms, and a background of a 
small room simply furnished. 5fet it 
was this picture which lived in his 
memory more than the other. 

"I can't write!" he exclaimed, 
throwing down the pen. "It would 
be too cruel, too villainous" — then he 
smiled contemptuously — "and I a 
wearer of the Victoria Cross!" 

He tore up the last sheet he had 
written upon and rang the bell. 

" Only nine o'clock! I'll go to-night. 
Parker, just call me a cab." 

"Yes, sir." 

He opened a drawer and took out 
his cheque-book. 

" Money will heal most wounds, but 
this one " 

He paused, and mechanically 
slipped the book into his pocket. 
Then with a muttered oath — indeed, 
was it an oathor a prayer? — he went 
out. 

The hansom rattled along Piccadilly, 
and down Sloane street to Chelsea. 

The journey was too soon accom- 
plished. At the corner of a street 
Captain Stainton got out and dis- 
missed the cab. 

He walked slowly, even passed his 
destination once, twice, then in a 
kind of desperation ascended the half- 
dozen steps which led to the front- 
door, and let himself in with a latch- 
key.- 

There was the sound of an opening 
door and then a little cry of joy as a 
girlish figure, clad in white, ran down 
the stairs to welcome him 



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Address 



Macbeth. Pittsburgh, Pa. 



" Oh I it's a week, Cuthbert— -a long, 
long week since I saw you." 

,f My dear little woman, I told you 
it would be at least a week before you 
saw me again." 

"I know, but I didn't think you 
meant it — quite." 

She was a pretty woman. At the 
first glance she seemed little more 
than a child — an innocent child. Her 
figure had scarcely yet put on the 
roundness of a woman's beauty, and 
her blue eyes opened wide, with a 
look of astonishment almost, as 
though the kaleidoscope world were 
new to her. But a second and longer 
glance revealed things which were not 
on the surface — passions, which in the 
best sense were deep and true: a wo- 
man's capacity for loving, and shield- 
ing with her love, never questioning 
whether the object of such a love were 
worthy or not. 

She had given her heart and soul to 
a man who was her hero, and nothing 
in the world beside mattered at all. 

She took his band and led him into 



Tenth Edition in a New Dress 
F. MARION CRAWFORD'S 



VIA CRUCIS 



The Way of the Cross. 

l2mo, red Buckram, 
$1.50. 



LEST the delicate cream buckram binding; of the earlier editions of 
Mr. CRAWFORD'S masterpiece should seem to some too dainty for 
the frequent handling; which its stong; interest compels, its publishers have 
on the appearance of a tenth edition (60,000) prepared a new cover, cer- 
tainly more durable, no less attractive and quite as appropriate, since the 
Crusader's cross still shines from the rich red cover— a beautiful book to 
look at and to read. 

'•A GREAT NOVEL .... SWEEPING THE READER ALONG BY 
THE SHEER STRENGTH AND VIVIDNESS OF THE NARRATIVE," 
says one critic, while many declare that it is nearly if not quite 
"THE BEST THAT MR. CRAWFORD HAS YET WRITTEN. 



THE flACMILLAN COflPANY, 



NEW YORK. 



February 3, rpoo. 

ber sitting- room. She pushed the 
easiest chair near the Are for him. 
put a case of cigars, which he had 
left when be was last there, on the 
table by bis side, and then seated her- 
self on a footstool and nestled ber 
bead against bis knee. 

"I suppose your friends have been 
saying all sorts of nice things to you," 
she said, "making you eat more 
dinners than you want, and drink 
more than is good for vou, perhaps." 

"Berthal" 

" That is an Englishman's way of 
showing his respect and admiration, 
isn't it?" 

" What a worldly-wise little woman 
it is!" he said, gently. 

And he remembered the cheque- 
book and what he had come that 
night to say, and bated himself. 

I don't think I am very worldly- 
wise, Cuthbert," she answered. "If 
I were, 3'ou would perhaps be less to 
me than you are." 

" What do you mean?" 

"My dearest, a man's love and a 
woman's are so different. You have 
been happy since you saw me last; I 
have been miserable." 

" Why, dear, why?" And he for- 
got the cheque-book, and the luxuri- 
ously furnished drawing-room and the 
beauty of two seasons. "Why, dear- 
est?" 

"IwoDder if you will understand, 
Cuthbert," she said, slowly, rising 
from the stool and seating herself on 
his knee. "You do love me?" 

"Yes." 

"More than any other woman in 
the world?" 

" Yes." He meant it. 

"Cuthbert, I don't want to be like 
other women wbo — " 

She paused, and a little sob came 
struggling out. 

"Tell me the trouble, darling." 

"I heard two men talking to-day. 
I went into the bank to get some 
money, and — " 

"What did the blackguards say?" 
he asked, angrily. 



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He bad guessed ber secret before 
it was uttered. 

"No, Cuthbert, they were not 
necessarily blackguards, but they 
spoke of me, you can guess how." 

" Said that you were my — " 

" Hushl I don't like the word." 

And she put her hand over his 
mouth. 

Stainton bit his lip. 

" We can give them tbe lie," he 
said. 

The woman looked at him. 

"How?" 

"You are not as other women, 
Bertha, and by Heaven you never 
shall be." 

"Cuthbert, I have asked you 
nothing." 

"Haven't you, little one?" he said, 
drawing her closer to him. "Per- 
haps not, but you have taught me 
something. Bertha, look at me. 
What do you see?" 

"The man I love,'' she answered. 

"And a hero, and goodness knows 
what, eh?" 

"No! Just the one man in the 
world I love." 

" Tell me always that, Bertha, and 
I shall be satisfied. There will be 
plenty in the world to speak ill of me. 
Better that I should tell you I am not 
a hero, child, but a selfish man, un- 
worthy of the great love of a true 
woman such as you are. But I am 
not wholly bad, Bertha — no, I have 
some goodin me, and, if I can, I'll live 
to be a good man. Little one, you 
must help me." 

"Only tell me how, Cuthbert." 

" We have begun our life together 
in a wrong fashion, little one. I can- 
not blush as you are doing, but I feel 
something of what you do, what you' 
did when those two men spoke. 
Bertha, will you be my wife?" 

"Do you mean it — really, truly?" 

"I do." 

"Not for pity's sake — for love's?" 

" For love's.'' 

There was a long silence. 

" We will go away for a time," he 
said, presently. 

"Cuthbert, you really love me?" 

"As my life. Someday I will show 
you how true m}' love is." 

***** 
A few nights later Captain Stainton 
sat at his writing-table. He had 
finished a letter which had given him 
considerable difficulty in writing, and 
had just addressed it when Parker 
came in. 

"I have written to Lord South- 
borough, Parker, and I hope you will 



like your new place." 

" Thank you, sir; but, begging 
your pardon, I'm very sorry to have 
to leave my old one." 

" I'm sorry to part with you, but 
I am going abroad and my return to 
England is a matter of uncertainty. 
One thing more I want you to do. 
To-morrow morning take that note to 
Miss Trevanyon, and there is no 
answer. Not before to-morrow 
morniog remember. Good-bye, 
Parker." 

"Good bye, sir." 

***** 

" What a fool!" said the men. 

" What a coward!" said the women. 

Edith Trevanyon tore the note into 
shreds. It may be that she under- 
stood that Captain Stainton was not 
a'together unworthy of his V. C. — 
Christian Lys, in Illustrated Bits. 



ftMAN may be as cool as an icicle 
under the most extraordinary 
circumstances of danger or excite- 
ment; he may preserve an even mind 
when a ghost walks into his room at 
midnight; he may assume command 
and act nobly and well when the ship 
is sinking; but let that man, let any 
man upset his inkstand, and he 
springs to his feet, makes a desper- 
ate grasp for the inkstand and 
knocks it half way across the table, 
clutches after his papers and sweeps 
through the sable puddle to save 
them, tears his handkerchief from 
his pocket and mops up the ink with 
it, and after he has smeared the table, 
his hands and trousers with ink as . 
far as it can be made to go, discovers 
that early in the engagement he 
knooked the inkstand clear off the 
table, and it has been draining its life 
ink away into the only light figure in 
the carpet. Then he wonders why a 
man always makes a fool of himself 
when he upsets a bottle of ink, but 
doesn't know why. Nobody knows 
why. But every time it is so. Try it. 



— Madge — Young Rashleigh's wife 
is very attentive to him, isn't she ? 
Mabel — Yes ; she had two private 
detectives on him for a month or more. 



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SAN FBANCISCO NEWS LETTEB. 



February 3, 1900. 




5UNBL7VM5 




STOLEN PEOM THIEVES. 



— In the year 2000 lived a man 
Who was so wondrous wise 
That he put into his stomach 
Full a score of oyster pies. 

And when the pains beset him sore, 

'Thout an apparent quake 
He took the stomach from its place 

And calmly watched it ache. 

— Mr. M. Balmer, the undertaker, was never at a loss 
for an answer when anyone attempted to poke fun at him 
or his profession. One day a would-be wit remarked to 
him: "Yours must be a gruesome business, Mr. Balmer. 
I suppose you undertakers never look at a man without 
wishing him dead." "You are mistaken," replied the un- 
dertaker, "I know some people whom I would be per- 
fectly willing to bury alive." 

The Rev. Gentleman — Where are you taking the beer 
to, little man? Little One — 'Ome to father, sir. Rev. 
G. — But your father doesn't drink beer now— since he has 
taken the pledge. Little One — No, bir; please, sir, he 
don't drink it — 'e only soaks 's bread in it. 

— He — Do you think odd numbers are lucky? She — 
Certainly; look how many unhappy marriages there are. 
There are two people to a marriage. He — And look how 
many unhappy bigamies there are. There are three peo- 
ple in a bigamy. 

— Jane, you do not look the same, 

Of tresses you have raised another crop, 
Then she tossed her raven hair, 
Saying, "This is mine, I swear. 
For my golden hair was purchased at the shop." 

The Old Man — Ah, when I was your age I didn't wear 
kid gloves and a cane. Algy (in an injured tone) — Well, 
father, I should think you'd expect to find some improve- 
ment in the family since that time. 

— "I hope," remarked the lovelorn youth, "that you 
will bear me out when I speak to your father." " I don't 
think it will be necessary," returned the maid coldly; 
"he'll probably attend to that himself." 

— " In my husband's library there isn't a book but what 
I've read. I wish I knew what to do next 1 " "Oh, k's 
very simple — get another husband I" 

— Orator — Ladies and gentlemen, the remarks I am 
about to make to you will all be summed up in one word. 
Voice in the Audience— Rot 1 

— "Papa, what do the men on the electric trams ring 
the bells so much for?" "Because, my boy, it helps to con- 
fuse pedestrians." 

— Binks— Ah, and how's the milkmaid? Unsophisti- 
cated Damsel — 'Taint made at all, sir; we gets it out of 
the cow. 

— "Does your portrait look like you, Dorothy?" "Yes, 
it looks just exactly as I would look if I were prettier than 
I am." 

—When two young persons think they are one, they act 
as if they thought they were everybody. 

CHICAGO IN THREE DAYS 
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year from San Francisco at 8:30 a. m. Buffet, smoking, library cars 
with barber. Double drawing-room sleeping cars. Dining cars- 
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Daily through tourist car to Chicago without change at 6:30 p. m! 
R. R. Ritchie, General agent Pacific Coast, 2 New Montgomery 
treet, (Palace Hotel) San Francisco. 



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February 3. 1900. 



BAN ] I ETTEK. 



21 



HP Rose 




THE WINE TH AT CO NQUERS CARE. 

[Th« nfral William Mr uittaor 

of " 1 * ' »inl other well-known poems. The 

The-e lines 
^ published (rom the original manu^oripl in pMMatlon of a 
lady who resides in OftJtfdl 

Nay. frown not. faireM ! Cfaldt DO more 

lame the blushing wine, 
lis firey lips are innocent 

When thrills the polM with thine, 
eave the tfohlet in my hand, 
But veil thy glances bright, 
Lest wine and beauty, mingling here, 
Should wreck my soul to-night. 

Then, dearest, to the ancient rim, 

In Sculptured beauty rare, 
Bow down thy red. arched lip and -juatt 

The wine that conquers care; 
And breathe upon the glowing cup 

Till thus its perfume be 
Sweet as the scent of orange groves 

Upon some tropic sea. 

Then while thy tingers idly stray 

In dalliance o'er the lyre, 
Sing to nie, love, some rare old song 

That gushed from heart of fire- 
Song such as Grecian phalanx hymmed 

When freedom's field was won, 
And Persia's glory, with the light 

Faded at Marathon. 
Sing till the shouts of armed men 

Ring bravely out once morel 
Sing till again the ghost-white tents 

Shine on the moonlit shore! 
Bid from their melancholy graves 

The buried hopes to start 
I knew ere many a storm had swept 

The dewdrops from my heart. 

Sing the deep memories of the past ! 

My soul shall follow thee — 
Its boundless depths are echoing 

Thy glorious minstrelsy: 
And as the sweet vibrations hang 

Enfettered on the air, 
I'll drink, thy white arms round me, love, 

The wine that conquers care. 



CARPE DIEM.— from omar khayyam. 

Ah ! my beloved, fill the cup that clears 
To-day of past regret and future fears. 
To-morrow ! Why, to-morrow I may be 
Myself with yesterday's seven thousand years. 

And if the wine you drink, the lips you press, 
End in what all begins and ends in, yes; 
Think then you are to-day what yesterday 
You were: to-morrow you shall not be less. 

So when the angel of the darker drink 

At last shall find you by the river brink, 

And, offering his cup, invite your soul 

Forth to your lips to quaff, you shall not shrink. 

I sent my soul through the Invisible, 
Some letter of that after-life to spell: 
And by and by my soul returned to me, 

And answered, "I myself am Heaven and Hell." 

SONNET.— MARY ASHLEY T0WN8END- 

— "and from sudden death." 
I cannot pray that prayer. Nay ; not for me 

Implore deliverance from sudden death I 

What is there in the stoppage of the breath 
To fright men so? Oh ! that my fate may be 
To lose, in one pulse beat, mortality— 

To be the fervent lightning's sudden sheath, 

The point where the tornado centereth, 
The spark extinguished instantaneously, 

I would not, anguish-led, existence quit, 
Nor halting go, like some scared, whimpering hound, 

With faltering steps toward the echoless verge. 
Nayl I would fain with one immediate bound 

The dark perfound leap into, and so merge 
At once the finite and the infinite. 



BANKING 



Bank of California, San Francisco 

Surplu*. ft. ■■• 

l'r..nt and I 
wit II AM U.VORD . Pmldonl I CHARLKR R. BISHOP. Via 

U.I.KN M. H.A1 * reUrr TIIOMA8 BROWN 

< prj prnas smith, \ 

OORRBSPON DKNTB 
LaldtawA Oo,: Ilia Bank ol Efow York, If, B, A. 

Italtlmorc— Tlio National Bxohaiw Hunk. 1: mil Sbawmul 

Hunk. Chloniro- riUnnin Trim! and Ravins* Hunk: Onion National Rank. 
Philadelphia -Philadelphia National Hunk. st. Loula -Boatman** Bunk. 
Vtnriniii < iiy. NY\. Arena? of The Hunk of California, London 
Vf.it. Rothschild A Son*. Pari* -Moans, da Rolhtohlld PrereA. Berlin 

- 11-. in. ft. China, Japan, and Baal fadlM Char- 
tered Hunk ol India. Australia, and I ohm Australia and New Zealand— ' The 
Union Hunk ..f Australia, Ltd.. and Hunk <.f (few Zealand. 
Letten <>f oredlt Issued available In nil porta <>f the world. 



San Francisco Savings Union 



July l. LS99, tM.920,996 
Paid-up Capital 1.000.000 

E. B. POND, President 
LOVELL WHITE. Cashier 



532 f'VUFORNIA STREET. S. P. 



Reserve Fund few* in 

Continccnt Fund 412,763 

W. 0. B. DeFREMERY, Vice-President 

R. M. WELCH, Assistant Cashier 



Directors— Geortre W. Beaver, Thomas Mnirec. W. C. B. do Fremery. Al« 
bert Miller, Robert Watt, George C. Bonrdnian, Dnnici B. Martin, Oeorse 
Taanelra, K. B, Pond. 

Loans upon San Francisco and Oakland real estate, and farms and farming 
lands tn the country. 

Receives deposits. Country remittances may bo mnde In cheeks payable 
In San Francisco, Post Office, or Wells Fareo tfc Co.'s Money Orders, or coin 
by Express, but the responsibility of this bank commences only with the 
receipt of the money. 

No charge is made for pass book or entrance fee. 

Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 3 p. m., and Saturday evenings, for receipt of de- 
posits only. 6;30 to 8 o'clock. 

Wells Fargo X Go. Bank 

N. E. Cor. Sansomk and Sutter Sts. 

JOHN J. VALENTINE. President H. WADSWORTH, Cashier 

HOMER S. KING, Manager F. L. LIPMAN. Assistant Cashier 

H. L. MILLER, Second Assistant Cashier. 

Cash Capital and Surplus $6,260,000 

Branches— New York City, H. B. Parsons, Cashier; Salt Lake City, J. E. 

Dooly. Cashier; Portland, Or., R. M. Dooly, Cashier. 

DIRECTORS— John J. Valentine. Andrew Christeson, Oliver Eldridjre. 

Henry E. Huntington. Homer S. King-, George E. Gray, John J. McCook, 

John Bermingham, Dudley Evans. 

Mutual Savings Bank of San Francisco 

33 Post St., below Kearny, Mechanics' Institute Building. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,000,000. Paid Up Capital $300,000 

James D. Phelan, President S. G. Murphy, Vice-President 

George A. Story, Cashier John A. Hooper, Vice-Presiden 

C. B. Hobson, Assistant Cashier. 

"Rate of Interest on Leans secured by improved 
San Francisco Real Estate - - SIX PER CENT 

Interest paid on deposits. Loans on approved securities. 
Deposits may be sent by postal order. Wells. Farjro & Co., or Exchange on 
city banks. When opening accounts send signature. 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

NO. 526 CALIFORNIA STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

Guarantee Capital and Surplus $2,213.1-16.59 

Capita] actually paid up in Cash 1.000 000 00 

Deposits December 30. 1899 .28,563,655.41 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— President. B. A. Becker; First Vice-President 
Daniel Meyer; Second Vice-President, H. Horstman: Cashier. A. H. R. 
Schmidt; Assistant Cashier, William Herrmann; Secretary. George Tourny 
Assistant Secretary, A. H. Muller; General Attorney, W. S. Goodfellow. 

Ien. SMnhart, E. Rohte, H. B. Russ, D. N. Walter. N, Ohlandt, and John 
Lloyd 

Continental Building X Loan Association 

Established in 1889. OF CALIFORNIA. 
SubHoribed Capital.. $10,000,000 Profit and Reserve Fund... $210,000 
Paid-in- Capital 1,500.000 Monthly Income, over 100,000 

Its Purpose is to help its members to build homes, also to make loans 
on improved property, the members giving first liens on their real estate as 
security. 

To help its Stockholders to earn 10 to 12 per cent, interest on their stock 
and allow them to open deposit accounts bearine; interest at the rate of 5 
per cent, per annum on Ordinary Deposits and 6 per cent, per annum on 
Term Deposits. 

Home Office— 222 Sansome St.. San Francisco. Cal. 

Wm. Corbin, Secretary and General Manaeer 



Crocker- Wool Worth National 



Bank 

OP SAN FRANCISCO 



Corner Market, Montgomery and Post Sts. 

Paid-up-Capital 81.000,000 

Wm. H. Crocker. President Geo. W. Kline. Cashier 

W. E. Brown, Vioe-President W. Geegg, Jr., Assistant Cashier 

Directors— W. H. Crocker, E. B. Pond, W. E. Brown, C. E. Green, G. W. 
Kline,Jtenry J. Crocker, G. W. Scott. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 3, 1900. 




NOW that the exhibition of bronzes at the Mark Hop- 
kins Institute of Art is ended, preparations for the 
Mardi Grasball have been begun in goad earnest. The 
Mary Frances Searles Art Gallery, the opening of which 
this ball will inaugurate, is nearing completion. A large 
force of workers are busy putting on the finishing touches 
to floors, walls and ceiling. The floor is going to be one 
of the finest if not the finest dancing floor in San Fran- 
cisco. It is made of selected maple polished to the 
smoothness of satin. There will be an orchestra of thirty 
pieces stationed in this magnificent hall and another in 
the gallery of the main building. The balcony upstairs 
overlooking this latter will be divided into boxes as form- 
erly. Boxes will also be erected in the new gallery for 
the benefit of those who wish to look on. Applications are 
already comin i in for these boxes, the prices of which 
vary according to size and location. Invitations for the 
ball will be issued next week. We understand that fancy 
costumes will be more universally worn this year than 
ever before, which is as it should be, this being a Mardi 
Gras carnival. 

Dances in golf clubhouses seem to be a fad just now. 
Last week a very pretty golf cotillion was given in the 
Oakland Clubhouse under the management of Mrs. Peter 
Bowles and Mrs. J. H. T. Watkinson, Peter Bowles act- 
ing as cotillion leader with much success. The weather 
seemed to clear up purposely to ensure the success of the 
dance given by ten young ladies in the Presidio Golf Club- 
house on Monday evening, and it was a very pleasant 
gathering. The rooms were decorated with ferns, flowers 
and huckelberry vines; guests to the number of a hundred 
or more thoroughly enjoyed the dance and the refresh- 
ments served in the lunchroom during the evening. The 
success of the evening was pronounced and many compli- 
ments were received by the young hostesses, the Misses 
Morgan, Alice Hoffman, Edith McBean, Caro Crockett, 
Mary Scott, Cora Smedberg, Carrie Taylor, Alice Hager 
and Genevieve Carolan. 

Then on Wednesday evening another dance took place 
in the Oakland Golf Clubhouse of which Mrs. J. C. Tucker 
and her daughter, Mrs. Detrick, were the hostesses; it 
was in honor of Miss Havemeyer of Chicago, who has been 
Mrs. Tucker's guest for some weeks, and who led the 
cotillion which followed the "Kinder Symphony," the at- 
traction of the earlier hours of the evening. 

Miss Follis' lunch on Tuesday was given at the Univer- 
sity Club, where her guests were seated at five round 
tables, each one decorated differently, the flowers used 
being violets, American beauty roses, lilies of the valley, 
daffodils and bridesmaids' roses, and an elaborate menu 
was served. 

Among the young ladies invited to meet Mrs. James 
Flood, for whose social debut the luncheon was given, were 
the Misses Kane, Brigham, Cora Smedberg, Laura Mc- 
Kinstry, Bessie Ames, Alice Hoffman, Caro Crockett, 
Helen, Edna and Georgie Hopkins, Margaret Salisbury' 
Sadie Collier, Carrie Taylor, Alice and Ethel Hagar, Leon- 
tine Blakeman, Therese Morgan, Mollie Thomas, Ruth Mc- 
Nutt, Anna Voorhees, Berny Drown, Ethel Cooper May 
Josselyn, Addie Murphy, Fanny Baldwin, Jesse Watt and 
Edith McBean. Mrs. Robert Oxnard and Mrs. James 
Keeney were the only married women besides the guest of 
honor. 

If a crush is an indication of success then the colonial 
evening of the California Club last Tuesday night certainly 
comes under that heading, for the large number of guests 
present almost exceeded the capacity of the club's quar- 
ters. The rooms were adorned with many relics of the 
olden time loaned by their owners for the occasion old 
furniture, paintings, china, guns, spinning-wheels 'and 
numberless other ornaments both curious and interesting 
Nearly all the ladies and a few of the gentlemen wore' 
colonial costume. There was a long musical programme- 
George T. Bromley gave a recitation and refreshments 
were served during the evening, but the minuet- de la Cour 



was omitted to the regret of all. The ladies of the receiv- 
ing party were Mrs. Lovell White, Mrs. J. W. Orr, Mrs. 
J. H. Jewett, Mrs. A. R. Cotton, Mrs. W. H. Mills, Mrs. 
J. J. Scoville. Mrs. George L. Smith, Mrs. Hadwin Swain, 
Mrs. John Russ, Dr. Dorethea Moore and Miss Berny 
Scoville. 

The exhibition of bronzes at the Art Institute which has 
been going on all week has scarcely drawn as large an at- 
tendance as the beauty of the exhibits deserved. It 
opened with a concert and private view last week and on 
Thursday evening of this week Mr. Henry Hey man ar- 
ranged an exceedingly attractive programme for the con- 
cert with which it closed. 

On last Monday evening the Entre Nous Club gave a 
theatre party at the Columbia, which was followed by 
supper in the new supper hall of the Palace Hotel. A 
number of theatre parties are being arranged to greet the 
Bostonians next Monday evening, and no doubt Miss Keith 
Wakeman's friends will also turn out in force to give her 
welcome at the California. It will be a delight to many 
to hear that they are to have a continuation of the sweet 
sounds in which they have of late luxuriated with Nevada, 
Trebelli and Clarence Eddy. The ever welcome Bos- 
tonians are to be with us some time, then there are the 
symphony concerts and a number of other concerts on the 
tapis, and finally and best of all Paderewski will soon be 
here again. 

The most important announcement of the week is that 
of the engagement of Miss Beatrice Tobin to M. Charles 
Raoul-Duval, which was made public last Saturday, and 
the probability is that the wedding will be an event of the 
very near future. From Oakland has come the announce- 
ment of Miss Jessie Coit's engagement to Wilfred Ransom 
of New York, but that wedding will not take place for 
several months yet. The wedding of Miss Mamie McMullen 
and Jesse Godley, which took place last Tuesday evening, 
was a quiet home ceremonial at the residence of the 
bride's mother on Post street. It was restricted to rela- 
tives and a few intimate friends only. 

There were several juvenile entertainments last week, 
"Baby" and otherwise, but possibly the most sensible of 
these was the luncheon given last Saturday by Mrs. E. J. 
Coleman to a dozen young girls still in the schoolroom — 
friends of her niece, Miss Lucy Gwin Coleman, whose 
birthday it was. The Gwins have always been renowned 
for the dainty repasts served their guests, and this one, 
though for juveniles, could not have been more elaborate. 
Roses in profusion, violets and daffodils decked the table, 
and after the menu had been gone through with the 
greater pleasure followed: the entire company adjourning 
to the Tivoli, where they enjoyed the comicalities of The 
Idol's Eye. 

Another recent combination entertainment was a de- 
lightful dinner, theatre party and down-town supper 
given by Mrs. Alexander Center to a number of young 
people. 

Mrs. George C. Shreve's tea at the Palace Hotel last 
Thursday was very pleasant and largely,, attended. The 
ladies who assisted at the function were Mesdames F. R. 
King, L. R. Jacobs, Mahlon Ver Mehr, F. H. Brewer, W. 
G. Dodge, Miss Berny Bates and Miss Bessie Shreve. 
Most of them dined with the hostess later in the evening. 

A Skin of Beauty is a Joy Forever. 



D 



R. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL 
CREAM, OR MAGICAL BEAUTIFIER. 



Removes Tan, Pimples, Freckles, 
Moth Hatches, Rash and Skin Dis- 
eases, and every blemish ou beauty, 
and denes detection. It has stood the 
test of 51 years and Is so harmless we 
taste it to be sure it is properly made. 
Accept no counterfeit of similar name. 
Dr. L. A. Hayre said to a lady of the 
haut-ton (a patient): "As you ladies 
will use them. I recommend *Gour- 

aud's Cream' as the least harmful of 
all the skin preparations." For sale 
by all drugiristH and Fancy-eroods 
Dealers in the United States, Canadas 
and Europe. 




FERD. T. HOPKINS, Prop'r. KZ 

37 Great Jones street, N, Y. 



February 3, 1900. 



BAN ] 1 in: 



*3 



Mrs. W Q Irwin has again distinguished herself as a 
hostess by giTing the largest card party of I 
last Saturday afternoon, when the prizes bestowed upon 
the successful ladies included some beautiful and ai 
articles in bronie and Dresden china. It might also have 
been called a rose party from the quantity of th-se lovelv 
flowers which met the eye at every turn. ' From four until 
seven o'clock the game of euchre was played with 
by the forty ladies who composed the party, and the re- 
freshments served were dainty to a degree." 

Mr. and Mrs. George Boyd have been spending the past 
week in the city, having come over from their San Rafael 
villa to attend the wedding anniversary dinner of Mr. and 
Mrs. Alexander Boyd. Mr. and Mrs." James Follis sailed 
by the steamer China for the Orient, en route for a trip 
around the world. Miss Bessie Bowie, the Misses May 
and Fanny Friedlander expect to leave about the middle 
of this month for Coronado, where they will remain during 
the Lenten season, possibly till late in the spring. Mr. 
and Mrs. Downey Harvey are at home again after a 
pleasant holiday visit to New York. 

Mrs. Ashe's friends are hoping that the rumor which 
has reached here from Honolulu that she, Mrs. Sewall and 
Mrs. Chase would return by the Australia may not be 
true, as two weeks in quarantine would be anything but a 
pleasant experience. 

The Misses Morrison of San Jose eatertained a "house 
party" from Friday to Monday at their residence N. E. 
corner of Fifth and Julian streets, their guests being Judge 
and Mrs. Bellinger of Portland, Or., Judge Gilbert of the 
United States Circuit Court of Appeals, Miss Gilbert and 
Mr. S. C. Houghton and a breakfast of twelve covers 
was given in their honor, the floral decorations being very 
elaborate. The party returned to town on Monday morn- 
ing. Judge Bellinger is sitting in the United States Cir- 
cuit Court during the month of January. 

Senator and Mrs. Stephen M. White are sojourning at 
Paraiso Springs. His many friends will be glad to learn 
of his rapid recovery from his recent serious illness. 

Judge H. G. Bond, recently elected president of the 
Cured Fruit Association, leaves for New York and Wash- 
ington this week. 

Winter and summer are pretty much alike in the balmy 
climate of San Rafael. The golfers golf and the horsemen 
horse and the Hotel Rafael is open, all the year round. 
Among the recent arrivals at the big hotel were: T. E. 
D. Philpot, England; R. E. Worthington, Racine; Mrs. 
Julius Ottenheimer, New York; Mrs. Louis Gerstle, Mrs. 
Louis Sloss, Mrs. E. R. Lilienthal, Will O'Connor, Theo. 
Leibermann, Mrs. L. Schmidt and daughter, Mrs. and 
Miss Giselman, Wm. A. Lange, Sam'l Newsom, Harry T. 
Moore, San Francisco; R. S. Collins and wife, Oakland; 
Misses Biggens, New York; Miss Meta Lennox, Carson; 
W. R. Haile, Washington, D. C. 

ONE of the most remarkable sales of dry goods in the 
history of San Francisco is the one that has been go- 
ing on for the last few weeks at J. J. O'Brien's. Every- 
thing that woman wants, and many things desirable to 
men, are in the mammoth stock that is being sold at rock 
bottom prices. All kinds of dress fabrics, underwear, 
hosiery, laces, gloves, handkerchiefs, towels, trimmings 
and ready-made garments are to be found in great 
variety. The established name of J. J. O'Brien & Co. as- 
sures the patron fair dealing and polite attention. 

A liberal education in art may be had by visiting the art rooms 
of William Morris, 248 Sutter street. On sale and exhibition are to 
be found paintings in oils, water colors, pastels, engravings, etchings 
and fancy prints. The very best quality of frames and frame 
materials are to be had at Morris'. There is always a picture show 
of interest in the gallery that is being added to day by day with the 
best work of native and foreign artists. 

Never in all its popular career has the Cafe Zinkand enjoyed a 
greater popularity than at the present moment. Everybody goes to 
the Zinkand after the play for the finest of wines, beers and snppprs 
and the inimitable music of Stark's string orchestra. It is the 
favorite resort of club men and society women. 

For the best of extra mince pies try the Original 

Vienna Cafe and Bakery, 205 Kearny street near Sutter. 



fNtJBE4i^ ,Gn ^ ; K E5 L c 




WE RESTORE 
SIGHT! 

CUSSES 
RENDER 
DEFECTIVE 
VISION 
CHRONIC. 

Write tor our 

ILLUSTRATED 

TREATISE. 

m.iiledtree. 

THE IDEAL 

COMPANY, 
239 Broadway 
New York 




FINE IMPORTED 

$30 == Scotch Tweeds == $40 

ftdsoa large line of High-Gkade Serges, Worsteds. 
Vesting'', Cinlf Knickerbockers, and Hose : : : : 

SnPPi/^l Have just received from London shipment of novelties fn 
, -'^•'*-'*■' ,Ci, Toadies' Costume Cloths. Inspection Invited. 

CRAIG BROTHERS, Importing Tailors 

120 Sutter Street, bet, Kearny and Montgomery streets. Take elevator. 

Birds, Gold Fish, Dogs 

OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS. 

PACIFIC COAST BIRD CO. 

211 Kearny St., San Francisco. Cal. 

SUPERFLUOUS HAIR 

painlessly and effectually 
removed by the Electric Needle. One course of ray treatment, I 
positively guarantee, extirpates the^e unsightly imperfections with- 
out mark or injury to the most delicate skin. Consultation free and 
confidential. Instruction given in any branch of the business. 

MISS BARRETT, Dermatologist, 1207 Market St., 0pp. City Hall. 

Joseph Gillott's Steel Pens, THE awar ckicago. 1893 

Gold Medals Paris, 1878-18'19. These pens are " the 
best in the world," Sole aeent for the United States, 
Mb. Hknkv Hoe, 91 John street. New York. 
Sold by all stationers. 

School of Elocution 

Miss Elizabeth McDonald, 19?.7 California St. 
Delsarte /Esthetic Physical Culture. Just formed, lessons in class to child- 
ren. Lessons private and in class. 



The Drummers' Inn 



105 Sansome street, San Francisco. 
Robt. D. Hagerty, proprietor 



Frank Carr. 



Telephone Main 6611. 



The Manhattan Cafe 



25 Geary Street. 

LadieB' Cafe and Wine Rooms, 25 Brook Place, S. F. 

THE CALIFORNIA HOTEL. Dinner.-Sunday, Feb. 4, 1900. 

Eastern Oysters Half-Shell. 
Soup.— Cream of Chicken a la Reine; Consomme aux Perles du Nizan. 
Hors D'aSovRES.— Salted Almonds; Chow Chow ; Haucission de Lyon; Ripe 

Olives. 
Fish.— Boiled Striped Bass, Sauce Nantua; Fried Filet of Sole a l'Orly; 

Pommes Nouvelles 
Boiled.— Smoked Shoulder of Ham aux Haricot Vertes. 

Entrees.— Beef Marrow on Toust, Sauce au Madeira; Larded Calf's Sweet- 
breads with Chicory; Lamh Chops a la Montford; Savarins au Rum. 
Roast.— Prime Ribs of Beef au Jus; Suekliner Pic: with Baked Apple; Stuffed 

Chicken au Cresson. Punch— Lalla Rookh, 
Vegetables.— Browned Sweet, Boiled, and Mashed Potatoes; Boiled Rice; 

Sugar Corn a la Creme; Asparagus. Butter Sauce; Green Peas a la An- 

glaise. 
Cold Meats— Roast Beef; Pate of Game a la Gelee; Smoked Beef Tongue: 

Ham. 
Salads. — Lettuce: Romaine; Escaroll; Russe. 
Dessert.— Apple Charlotte, Lemon Sauce : Mince Pie: Orange Cream Pie; 

Chocolate Eclairs; Vanilu lee Cream; Assorted Nuts, Cluster Ritisins. 

Assorted Cakes : American, Cream, Edam, and Roquefort Cheese; 

Fruit in Season; Smyrna FigB; Tea and Coffee. 
Dishes not on this menu can be ordered at restaurant prices. Dinner 6 to 8 p. m 
R. H. Wabfield & Co., Proprietors, 



Southern Pacific Co.—Pacific System. 

Trains Leave and are due to arrive at SAN FRANCISCO: 
[Main Line, Foot of Market Sbreet] 



leave] 



Prom December 15, 1899 



[arrive 

*7:00a Benicia, Suisun, EIraira, Vacaville, Rumsey, and Sacramento.. *7rf5 p 

*7:00a Shasta Express— Davis, Willows, Red BhnT, Portland *7:45 P 

*7:30a Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Calistoga, Santa Rosa ^firlS p 

*8:30a The Overland Limited— Ogden, Denver, Omaha. Chicago *'5:15 P 

°8:30a San Jose, Livermore, Stockton, lone. Sacramento, Placerville, 

Marysville. Chico. Red Bluff. *4:15 p 

*8:30a ^Milton.Oakdale.andSonora, *4:15 p 

*9:00 A Haywards, Niles. and way stations ''11:45 a 

*9:00 a Davis, Woodland, Knights Landing;, Marysville, Oroville- '7:45 p 

*9:00a Atlantic Express, Ogden and East ''9:45 A 

*9:00 A Martinez, Tracy, Lathrop. Stockton, Merced and Fresno *12:15 p 

*9:00 A Port Costa, Fresno, Mojave and Los Angeles *6:45 p 

*10:00a Vallejo, Martinez, and way stations *6:45 p 

*11:00a Haywards, Niles, and way stations ''2:45 p 

*12:00m Niles, Livermore, Stockton, Sacramento, Mendota, Hanford, 

Visalia, Porterville *4:15 P 

tl:O0p Sacramento River Steamers 1* :0 ° p 

*3:00p Haywards, Niles and way stations *5:45 P 

*"4:00p Martinez, San Ramon, Vallejo, Napa, Calistoga, Santa Rosa *9:15 A 

*4 :00 p Benicia, Vacaville, Sacramento, Woodland, Knight's Landing' 

Marysville. Oroville *10:45 a 

*4:30p Niles, San Jose, and Stockton..... *7:15 p 

*5:00p The Owl Limited. Tracy, Fresno, Bakersfield, Saugus for 

Santa Barbara, Los Angeles *10:45 A 

35:00 P Sunset Limited— El Paso, New Orleans and East '"10:45 A 

*5ffl0 P Stockton, Merced, Fresno •'■'12:15 p 

*5:30 p Fresno, Bakersfield, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Deniing, El 

Paso, New Orleans, and East *"8:45 A 

*5:30p SantaFe Route, Atlantic Express, for Mojave and East *6:45 P 

*6:00p Hay wards, Niles, and San Jose *7:45 A 

+6:30 p Vallejo *12:15 p 

*6:30p Oriental Mail— Ogden and East *8:50 P 

|7:00p Vallejo, Port Costa, and way stations..; 19:55 p 

**8:05p Oregon and California Express, Sacramento, Marysville, Red- 
ding, Portland Puget Sound and East '''8:15 a 

Coast Division (Narrow Gauge). (Foot of Market St.) 

*8:15a Newark, Centerville. San Jose, Felton, Boulder Creek, Santa 

Cruz and way stations *5:50 P 

f2:15P Newark, Centerville, San Jose, New Almaden, Felton, Boul- 
der Creek, Santa Cruz, and principal way stations fl0:50 a 

*4:15p Newark, San Jose, Los Gatos *9:20 a 

611:45p Hunters' Excursion, San Jose and waystations J7:20 p 

CREEK ROUTE FERRY. 

From San Francisco— Foot of Market street (Slip 8).— *7:15, 9:00. and 11:00 
A. M., $1:00, *2:00. J3:00, *4:00, t5:00and*6:00 p. m. 

From Oakland— Foot of Broadway.— *6:00, 8:00, 10:00 a. m.; tl2:00, *1-00 
t2:00, *3:00, t4:00, *5:00 p. m. 

Coast Division (Broad Gauge). (Third and Townsend streets). 

f6:10A Ocean View, South San Francisco +6:30 p 

*7:00a San Jose and way stations (New Almaden Wednesday only) *1:30 P 

*9:00a SanJose, TresPinos, Santa Cruz, Pacific Grove, Paso Rubles, 

San Luis Obispo, Surf, Lompoc. and principal waystations *4:10 p 

*10:40a San Jose and way stations *6:35 A 

*11:30 A San Jose and waystations *5:30 p 

f2:45 P San Mateo, Redwood, Menlo Park, Palo Alto, Santa Clara. San 
Jose, Tres Pinos, Santa Cruz, Salinas. Monterey, and Pacific 

Grove +10:36 A 

3:30P SanJose and Way Stations *7:30 P 

"4:15p San Jose and Principal Way Stations *9:45 a 

"5:00 p San Jose and Principal Way Stations +9:00 a 

"5:30p San Jose and Principal Way Stations *8:85 A 

""6:30? San Jose and Way Stations +8:Q0 a 

&11:45p SanJose and Way Stations... , *7;30 p 

A for Morning. pfor Afternoon. * Daily. + Sundays excepted. 

I Sundays only. 6 Saturdays only. 
« Tuesdays and Fridays. c Thursdays and Sundays . 

The Pacific Transfer Company will call for and check baggage from 
hotels and residences. Enquire of Ticket Agents for Time Cards and other 
information. 

Occidental and Oriental Steamship Co. 

FOR JAPAN AND CHINA. 
Steamers leave wharf, FLRST and BRANNAN STREETS, at 1 p. m., for 
YOKOHAMA AND HONG KONG, 

calling at Kobe (Hiogo), Nagasaki and Shanghai, and connecting at Hongkong 
with steamers for India, etc. No cargo received on board on day of sailing. 

Doric (via Honolulu) Thursday, February 1, 1900 

Coptic (via Honolulu) Tuesday, February 27 1900 

Gaelic (via Honolulu) Friday, March 23, 1900 

Doric (via Honolulu) Tuesday, April 17, 1900 

Round Trip Tickets at Reduced Rates. 

For freight or passage apply at Company's Office, No. 421 Market street 
corner First. D. D. STUBBS, General Manager. 

Steamers leave Broadway 
Wharf, San Francisco. 

ForAlaskanports.lOA.M.Feb.5, 10. 15, 20, 25, March ° 
change to company's steamers at Seattle. 

For B. C. and Puget Sound Ports, 10 A. M., Feb. 5, 10, 15 20 
25; March. 2, and every fifth day thereafter. 

For Eureka (Humboldt Bay) 2 p. «., Feb. 3 8 13 18 23 
28; March 5. and every fifth day thereafter. 
For Newport (Los Angeles) and way ports, 9 A. m. Feb. 
4, 8, 12,16, 20, 24, 28; March 5, and every fourth day thereafter. 

For San Diego, stopping only at Port Harford. Santa Barbara Port Los 
Angeles, Redondo, (Los Angeles) 11 a. m., Feb. 2, 6,10, 14, 18, 22 26 - March 2 
andevery fourth day thereafter. ' ' ' 

For Mexican ports. Ill a m., 7th of each month. 
For further information obtain company's folder. 

The company reserves the right to change steamers, sailing dates and 
hours of sailing, without previous notice., 

TICKET OFFICE— No. 4 New Montgomery street. (Palace Hotel ) 

GOOD ALL, PERKINS & CO., Gen.Agts., 10 Market St.. San Francisco 



Pacific Coast Steamship Co. 




Alaska Commercial Co. 

- - FOR - - 

(tome, 5t- /T)ier?ael, Dau/son 

And all points on Yukon River 
Carrying United States Mail. 



For NOriE direct : 

From San Franci-co, 8. S. Portland April 30, 1900 

From Seattle, 8. S. Dora April 30, 1900 

From San Francisco, S. S. Rainier , May 10, 1900 



For Nome, St. Hichael. and all other points 

From Francisco, 8. S. St Paul May 25, 1900 

A steamer will be dispatched every fortnight thereafter. 



For Juneau, Sitka, Prince William 
Sound, Cook's Inlet, Kodiak, XZmT* 

From Seattle S.S. Bertha, commencing April 8th 

And monthly thereafter. 



For new folders, maps, and farther particulars as to freight and 
passage, apply to Alaska Commercial Company, 310 Sansome St., 
San Francisco, Cal. For Seattle sailings apply to Capt. Jas. Car- 
roll, Mutual Life Building, Seattle. Washington. 

California Northwestern R'y Co. 

LESSEE 

San Francisco and North Pacific R'y Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO TO SAN RAFAEL. Tibdron Ferry— Foot of Market Street 
WEEK DAYS— 7:30,9:00,11:00 A. m: 12:35, 3:30, 5:10, 6:30 p. M. Thursdays- 
Extra trip at 11 :30 p. M. Saturdays— Extra trips at 1 :50 and 11 :30 p. M. 
SUNDAYS— 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 A. M.; 1:30, 3:30, 5:00, 6:20 p. m. 
SAN RAFAEL TO SAN FRANCISCO. 
WEEK DAYS— 6:10,7:50.9:20,11:10 A. M.; 12:45, 3:40, 5:10 P. M. Saturdays- 
Extra trips at 1 :55 and 6:35 p. M. 

SUNDAYS— 8:10, 9:40. 11:10 A.M.: 1:40, 3:40, 5:05, 6:25 P. M. 
Between San Francisco and Schuetzen Park, same schedule as above. 



Leave San Francisco 


In Effect Oct. 15, 1899 


Arrive in San Francisco 


Week days 


Sundays 


Destinations 


Sundays 


Week days 


7:30 am 
3:30 pm 
5:10 pm 


8:00 AM 
0:30 AM 
5:00 pm 


Novato 
Petal uma 
Santa Rosa 


10:40 am 
6;05 PM 
7:35 PM 


8:40 AM 
10:25 AM 
6:22 pm 


7:30 am 
3:30 pm 


8:00 AM 


Fulton, Windsor, 

Healdshurg, Lytton, 

Geyserville, Cloverdale 


7:35 pm 


10:25 AH 
632 PM 


7:30 am 


8:00 AM 


Hopland, TJkiah 


7:35 PM 


6:22 PM 


7:30 am 
3;30 pm 


8:00 AM 


Guerneville 


7:35 pm 


10:25 am 
6:22 pm 


7:30 am 
5:10 pm 


8:00 am 
5:00 pm 


Sonoma 
Glen Ellen 


10:40 am 
6:05 pm 


8:40 AM 
6:22 pm 



8:00 am 
5:00 pm 



Sehastopol 



10:40 am 
7:35 pm 



10:25 AM 
6:22 pm 



Stages connect at Santa Rosa for Mark West Springs and White Sulphur 
Springs; at Lytton for Lytton Springs; at Geyserville for Skaggs' Springs; at 
Cloverdale for the Geysers ; at Hopland for Duncan Springs, Highland Springs 
Kelsey\-ille, Carlsbad Springs, Soda Bay, Lakeport. and Bartlett Springs; at 
Ukiah, for Vichy Springs. Saratoga Springs, Blue Lakes, Laurel Del Lake, 
Witter Springs, Upper Lake, Porno, Potter Valley, John Day's, Riverside, 
Lierley's, Bucknell's, Sanhedrin Heights, Hullville, Booneville, Philo, 
Christine Soda Springs, Navarro, Whitesboro, Albion. Little River, Orr's 
Springs, Mendocino City, Fort Bragg, Westport, Usal Willits, Laytonville, 
On minings. Bell's Springs, Harris, Olsen's, Dyer, Scotia, and Eureka. 

Saturday-to-Monday Round Trip Tickets at reduced rates. On Sundays, 
Round Trip Tickets to all points beyond San Rafael at half rates. 
TICKET OFFICE— 650 Market St., Chronicle Building. 

H. C. WHITING, Gen. Manager. R. X. RYAN. Gen. Pass. Agent. 



EANIC 




SS " Australia," Wednesday. Feb. 7, 1900. 2 p. m. 
SS " Alameda," Wednesday, Feb. 21, at 8 p. m. 
Line to Coolgardie, Australia, and Capetown, South 
Africa. 

J. D. SPRECKELS &. BROS CO 
Agents, 111 Montgomery St. Freight office, 327 
Market St., San Francisco. 



/Via. par cmyy to aovla. 



raTABLiOMeo «;vly ao. lasa 



Annual (fcWi;4um f l 








(^alif^mta^PJbrjcrtisjer. 




Ko/. z* 



S^tf FRANCISCO, FEBRUARY 10, 1900. 



Number 6. 



Printed and published every Saturday by the proprietor. FRED MARRIOTT 
tii Kearny street. San Franciaco. Entered at San Francisco Po»l- 
otnoe aa Sccond-claas Matter. 

The offlce ol the NKW8 LETTER hi New York City la »t SlI Park Row 
Bid*.. (Fred A. Marriott Eastern Representative), where information 
mar he obtained regarding subscription and advertising rated. 

All aocial Items. announcements, advertising, or other matter, intended lor 
publication in the current number of tho NEWS LETTER, should bo 
sent to this office not Inter than six o'clock Thnr«Hiiv Hitemoon. 

KENTUCKY is afflicted with a crop of over ripe 
Colonels. 

BULLER stili refuses to consider himself at the head of 
a Dews bureau. 

FEW SiluriaDs should be captured for the new mus- 
eum. The breed is almost extinct. 



ft 
J 



OE Chamberlain acknowledges that mistakes have 
been made but not that he is one of them. 



SAN FRANCISCO'S post-office receipts are growing 
much faster than the new post-office building. 

GENERAL Corbin may be a gentleman, but if so the 
country would be glad to see him throw off his dis- 
guise. 

IT is a happy circumstance that the triumph of Bard 
pleases equally well the Republican and the Democratic 
ends of the Call. 

LEGISLATORS at Sacramento declined to express 
sympathy for the Boers; in other words, they refused 
to cater to the Irish vote. 



"/"MVE up friends, children, peace and comfort." — Ex- 
V3 tract from the recipe of Capitalist Bradbury for 
getting rich. Hurrah for poverty I 

PEOPLE who permit their babes to play on the railroad 
track have no right to blame the engineer nor Provi- 
dence for anything that may happen. 

THE electric hansom has been known to run away, but 
in its favor may be given the fact that it did not do 
80 after having shied at a piece of paper. 

WITH President Jordan deploring war, and Conan 
Doyle upholding it the time would seem to be propi- 
tious for the distiuguished gentlemen to pair. 

COLONISTS are rushing toCuba, and those with money 
to pay fare home are rushing out again. The usual 
swindling transportation companies are at their old tricks. 

ftCCOUNTS written in London of the Boer war differ 
from those written in New York only in literary style. 
Neither set of authors permit themselves to be hampered 
by facts. 

JUT AUD Gonne announces a determination to come to 
i'l this Coast. Well, this region survived a season of 
Emma Goldman, and it has ever in its midst a B. Fay 
Mills and a Dille. 

CONSIDERABLE fuss is being made because a religious 
enthusiast at Amsterdam recently sacrificed four 
people, using a knife of about the style Abraham had to 
play a similar trick on Isaac. Little folks go to Sunday 
school to learn how good this was of Abraham, and the 
Amsterdam gentleman is in an uncomfortable jail. Times 
seem to have changed. 



IF Paris is not a fitting place for the British Ambassador 
to stay, a great many Englishmen who would have 
visited the Exposition will be apt to take a similar view 
of it. 

THE coming to this country of Buddhist missionaries 
from Japan will not meet the approval of the churches 
who have been sending their particular brand of light to 
the Buddhists. 

BRYAN says he will not give up his silver fad. Being 
aware that he could not win even without this handi- 
cap he prefers to cling to it so as to have some tangible 
excuse for getting licked. 

THERE has been decided betterment in the part of the 
city of which the Hall of Justice is the center. Streets 
are being improved, old structures renovated, and a new 
air of life and bustle is perceptible. 

PROM Kentucky comes the statement that politics had 
nothing to do with the murder of Goebel. That State 
is perhaps the only one where bloodshed could thus be made 
the subject of jest. 

ONCE more are tender-hearted philanthropists contend- 
ing that capital punishment is not a deterrent of 
crime. Nevertheless, they have failed to cite an instance 
where a man duly hanged has thereafter indulged in the 
pleasures of assassination. 

SMONG the humors of the war must be reckoned 
Joubert's complaint that the Ladysmith garrison kept 
his soldiers out of bed by failing to make an expected 
night attack. The Boer spies bad forgotten to announce 
the change in the programme. 

US GRANT spent thousands of dollars for the fun of 
, cherishing the delusion that he might be Senator, 
and Bard didn't spend a cent, but had the reality thrust 
at him. To ask Grant if the fun was worth the money 
would be almost indelicate. 



THE Nevada girl who according to pathetic newspaper 
accounts appearing last week was patiently and 
sweetly dying of injuries acquired at basket ball, does not 
believe it. She pauses in her studies at the University 
long enough to express her disbelief. Her view of the 
matter will be accepted. 

BY a curious coincidence the Call and the Bulletin pub- 
lished simultaneously last Sunday the thrilling story 
of the English nobleman who was utilized as bait for a 
tiger trap. Stranger still, on the same day, the Bulletin 
and the Examiner appeared with an identical version of 
the life of Dorothy Dene, Sir Frederick Leighton's famous 
model. What a pity it is that the Sunday papers cannot 
come to some arrangement in the matter of steals. 

THE Supervisors are quite within their rights in 
pandering to the prejudices of the anti-British section 
of the community. But if they choose to adopt this un- 
dignified method of catching a few stray votes they should 
at least remember a well known legal maxim, and refrain 
from giving their reasons. They passed a resolution of 
sympathy with the Boers because they are:— "A sturdy 
race of liberty loving people engaged in a magnificent and 
unconquerable struggle for freedom against the most 
colossal and avaricious Empire in the world." Mayor 
Phelan should give the Supervisors a taste of Boer liberty 
and they would soon learn to sigh for British tyranny. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February io, 1900. 



VAUDEVILLE PARSONS AND SIDE ENTRANCES. 

HARDLY a week passes but some San Francisco clergy- 
man exposes himself to the public as an ass, and it is 
small wonder that there are people of the opinion that all 
clergymen are asses. The News Letter has always held 
that there are as good men in the pulpit as out of it; and 
the good men of the cloth are quite as conspicuous by their 
scarcity as are those of the outer world. The latest ass 
to noise the banal bray is the Reverend John A. B. Wil- 
son, who comes not to bury murdered Amy Murphy but 
to roast seducer Poulin, and to' advocate the general em- 
ployment of the knife, the revolver, and the battle-axe in 
cases of unlawful cohabitation. Says this hot-mouthed 
divine, " I want to see the day when every State in the 
Union will make it justifiable homicide for the brother or 
father of a wronged girl to kill the fellow whose infamous 
footsteps crossed the threshold of her home. " As a promoter 
of law and order, and a breather of the sweet spirit of 
Christianity as preached by the Man of Nazareth, this 
gentleman from the south takes the bun. Of all the vaude- 
ville stars that have twinkled in the pulpit he is the most 
dazzling. And the dailies are his press agents. In ordi- 
nary circumstances we are inclined to take it as a joke 
when a parson makes a monkey of himself. In ordinary 
circumstances it would be a big joke to observe a paid 
servant of the Lord standing upon his hind limbs and 
preaching the beauties of throat-slitting, club-swatting, 
and pistol-plugging. But it so happens that the present 
circumstances are more than ordinary. A young woman 
has done away with her own life, and her lover is detained 
by the authorities with what at one time appeared to be 
a fair chance of having a murder charge lodged against 
him, to say nothing about the other offense of seduction, 
which the Reverend Wilson shouts should be punished off 
hand by the ready kinsman of the seduced. And it was 
in his capacity of officiating clergyman at the funeral of 
Amy Murphy that this Southern pulpiteer loosed the thun- 
ders of his unreason. His Morosco remarks are not only 
an offense against the dead, but an insult to the living. 
The Reverend Wilson should be rendered tongueless by any 
of the favorite weapons of his native State. The noise of 
him at such a time and place is obscene. Anyway, we 
have altogether too much "hot air" from the pulpit. The 
clergymen are rapidly crowding for place the legitimate 
theatrical performers and the illegitimate Sunday supple- 
ments. Day by day their usefulness becomes more ambig- 
uous. The parsons and the amateur sentimentalists would 
do well to keep away from such a subject as the one now 
under discussion. Amy Murphy is dead ; her lover is a 
cheap, self-confessed cad. The case is of special moment 
only on account of the suicidal end of it; but it forces public 
attention on an evil that in this city has for years run 
riot — the side entrance to the saloon, the small back room 
and the seductive drink. Nine out of every ten girls ruined 
in San Francisco can attribute their downfall to the easy 
manner in which facilities were found for its accomplish- 
ment. There are scores of saloons in the best part of the 
downtown district where drinks are served in private 
rooms to girls and women of all ages. There are a dozen 
and more French restaurants whose apartments are elabo- 
rately and deliberately gotten up for the accommodation of 
Poulins and Amy Murphys. There are saloons even in the 
neighborhood of Golden Gate Park that have bedrooms 
adjoining the little drinkirig boxes on the ground floor. 
Such places are conducted in open violation of the law! 
They are persistent invitations to immorality. They are 
responsible for most of the real immorality of the city. 
Without them, there would be far fewer Amy Murphys 
We beg to remind the Police Commissioners that Chinatown 
is not the only part of the city that demands their severest 
attention. The side entrance should be closed. 



STAND BY THE MAYOR. 

IT is easier to pull down than to build up. Criticism is a 
destructive element that merits no place alongside of 
the energies of constructive ability. That is the whole 
case between Mayor Phelan and his critics, put in a nut- 
shell. He is engaged day by day, and almost night by 
night, in an earnest and single-minded endeavor to clean 
out an Augean stable of corruption, and to start this city 
if that be possible, on an era of reform. We are very 



much disposed to agree with Police Commissioner Thomas 
that "it is impossible." But a trial is being made by a 
man as well equipped for the purpose, and as strong as 
any other citizen of San Francisco who could be named. 
So far public opinion has sustained him in a manner that 
left nothing to be desired. He must not be deserted now 
when he most needs support. Least of all must he be 
given up to his enemies to be crucified. The two morning 
dailies that are so industriously barking at his heels, op- 
posed the charter, opposed his election as Mayor, and 
will continue to oppose anything they do not control for 
evil. They are simply trying, no matter what the conse- 
quences may be to San Francisco, to bring about a fulfil- 
ment of their own dire prognostications. If they were as 
eager to help build up as they are to destroy, they would 
soon come by that "influence" which they did not possess 
at the last election, and which they have since sought for 
in vain. Fancy their impudent demands upon the man 
they bitterly opposed for places on the Police Commissionl 
That they did not get them is history. That they are 
"playing for even" is now the spectacle presented for the 
admiration of men and gods. As one of the tricks of the 
game, they have exposed to the public gaze some half a 
dozen soreheads that are ugly to the sight and bad to the 
smell. They claim to have supported Mayor Phelan, but 
if they did, it was merely for "what was in it." Mayor 
Phelan never better demonstrated his ability to take care 
of himself and of the city's interests, than when, by a 
happy intuition, he "turned down" just the right men. 
Stewart Menzies for Commissioner of Policel Faugh! In 
very mercy we refrain from saying more, but the people 
who have time and again rejected him at the polls know 
what could be said. Lawyer Clement, of course, has 
turned his back on the Mayor. But then Clement's back 
is better than his face, as could be easily demonstrated if 
it were worth while. It is sufficient that he was badly 
beaten as a candidate on the Republican ticket, and that 
he possesses not a single qualification for the office of 
Civil Service Commissioner which he sought at the hands 
of Mayor Phelan. A discriminating public will not be 
turned from the support of the Mayor by the bowlings of 
men turned down for cause. 



THE HAY-PAUNCEFOTE TREATY. 

THE Clayton-Bulwer treaty between the United States 
and Great Britain provides in terms as explicit as 
they could be made, that no navigable canal should ever 
be built across the Isthmus of Darien except by their joint 
consent and control. It is a solemn compact that could 
not be honorably set aside by either party without the 
approval of the other. As long as it remains unrepealed 
it obviously stands in the way of the construction of the 
Nicaragua Canal by the United States alone. Clearly it 
is to our interest to get rid of our treaty obligations in 
that regard. Some people, and the yellow journals in 
particular, have declared that those obligations are 
abrogated by reason of old age. That is an assertion, but 
not a fact. If it were true, nine-tenths of the treaties 
now existing between nations would be null and 
void, and the treaty guaranteeing the independence of 
Belgium, and our own treaty of Ghent, would go by board 
with the rest. Time rather sanctifies than annuls treaties. 
Unless the Clayton-Bulwer treaty can be got rid of by 
mutual consent, we cannot go ahead and build the 
Nicaragua Canal without dishonor. Suppose England had 
determined by herself alone to accomplish that which we 
now propose to do, should we not have had something 
serious to say in the premises? It is a bad rule that does 
not work both ways. Happily, Great Britain now waives 
her rights, conditioned only upon the canal being open to 
the commerce of all nations; just as the Suez Canal is. 
The latter waterway is owned by a joint stock company, 
of which England controls a majority of the stock. Yet 
by international agreement the canal is open to all nations 
alike. The company is not operating for its health, but is 
glad to receive tolls from everywhere. Just so should it 
be with the proposed Nicaragua Canal. Presumably we 
want to make it a paying investment, which can only be 
done by drawing revenue from all possible sources. There 
are some things that international interests will not per- 
mit to be made monopolies of. The high seas and the 






February 10, 1900. 



s\\- vv.\- iter. 



witorways that connect thorn are among these. So alio 
•re the telegraph wires that girdle the world. England 
owns the most of these, but she does not dream of making 
* monopoly of them. We are now a world power and 
must act in such matters as the nations do. There can be 
do Nicaragua Canal for our sole use; for the passage of 
our own vessels alone. Yet we are told that the Hay- 
Pauncefote treaty cannot be ratified without somr 
proviso. What then? The Clayton-Bulwer treaty will 
remain unrepealed, and the great powers will be warned 
as to our purpose. It will be lamentable if better councils 
do not prevail. We should do in this matter, as in ail 
others, as we would be done by. 



POLITICS AND PISTOLS IN KENTUCKY. 

IF the proud old State of Kentucky could but realize 
what the outside world is saying and thinking about 
her shot-gun methods of settling political as well as per- 
sonal disputes, she would surely find some way of enforcing 
respect for human life, whilst at the same time maintain- 
ing law and order. The assassination of Governor-elect 
Goebel is lamentable from whatever point of view it is 
considered. The dispute between him and his rival, 
Taylor, was a mere question of fact as to which of them 
bad the majority of votes cast. The law casts upon the 
Legislature the burden of ascertaining and declaring that 
fact. That body was in session and was about to proceed 
to count the votes, when a rifle shot was fired from a win- 
dow of the Capitol, inflicting a wound upon Goebel from 
which he has since died. Nobody has been arrested, and 
it is not thought likely that anybody will be brought to 
trial, simply because a jury could not be obtained in Ken- 
tucky to convict the assassin. The wild and wooly West 
has some hard things said about it, because of its assumed 
lawlessness, but it is not to be considered in that connec- 
tion alongside of the older, and what ought to be the more 
civilized commonwealth of Kentucky. The Chief Judge of 
the highest court in that State was not long ago killed by 
a rifle shot in open court by an incensed litigant, and his 
murderer was soon thereafter set at large. Goebel him- 
self not long ago inflicted death upon a political opponent 
in a political quarrel. That opponent, a man named San- 
ford, wrote an arraignment of Goebel in a Covington 
journal, for which Goebel called him to account. When 
they met Goebel killed him, and the explanation was that 
"he believed the man was in the act of drawing a knife." 
That explanation satisfied a jury, although it was proven 
that the man did not have a knife to draw. This event 
seems to have increased rather than impaired Goebel's 
popularity, as his apparent election for Governor demon- 
strates. Kentucky may not now be in a mood to learn 
the lesson which her numerous tragedies teach, but other 
States are, and Kentucky herself will have to learn it 
eventually, for it is being taught her in blood, in shame, 
and in tears. 

EMPIRE BUILDING ON THE PACIFIC. 

WHATEVER else may be said as to imperialism and 
the future of the Philippines, it is certain that the 
new departure made by the United States on this ocean 
must work for the everlasting advantage of the Pacific 
Coast States. The foremost duty that confronts Cali- 
fornia at this juncture is to awake to a lively realization of 
what there is in it for her. She must so control events 
as to bend them to her own up-building. Prom the days 
of Anson Burlinghame until now, our orators have rounded 
their most swelling periods with glowing word pictures of 
the great future the trade of the Pacific would bring to 
the Golden State. Heretofore all this has seemed very 
dreamy and very distant. But the past year has changed 
all that. During that brief period we have practically 
annexed the Pacific Ocean for trade purposes. We have 
secured a safe right of way for boundless commercial ex- 
pansion in all the countries around the vast ocean that 
confronts us. Hawaii, Guam and the Philippines are but 
means to an ultimate end. They are links in the chain 
that is to connect us with the markets of the Orient. We 
need to be in closer touch with all of them by means of 
ocean cables, and our Government will require to control 
a complete telegraphic system for the entire Pacific; all 
of which will come in good time. So far as this country is 



concerned, it appears that "the open door" in China has 
been secured. England, Russia, France and Germany 
are pledged in advance l<> do nothing to close that door 
against our traders. In territory that they now or may 
.fter occupy they are to admit our wares upon like 
terms with their own. We could ask for no more. The 
rood Is clear. Now to business. 

It could be wished that the future form of government 
and the official status of the Philippines might be settled 
at this session of Congress. We cannot too soon know the 
terms upon which our merchants are to be permitted to 
make a great trading post of Manila. From that center 
we must branch out to the countries around. At present 
goods sent from here to Manila have to pay duties as if 
they were landed at a foreign port. If the islands are to 
constitute a territory, it would seem that there must be 
free trade between them and this country. The United 
States Constitution provides that duties shall be uniform 
throughout the States and territories. Then the difficulty 
arises that if our goods are admitted duty free, those of 
other countries must be also. We cannot ask for an open 
door for ourselves, and close it against others. Whatever 
solution of this difficulty the Administration has in mind 
ought to be made known at as early a date as possible, to 
the end that our merchants may know how to go to work 
to develop commerce in that region. 

CALIFORNIA'S LEGISLATURE DOES THE UNEXPECTED. 

OUR Solons assembled at Sacramento have at last suc- 
ceeded in selecting the man who is to go to Washing- 
ton as California's second Senator. Why they did not 
perform that single and simple duty a year ago does not 
appear upon the surface. The reason is not in sight, but 
it can be as surely surmised as if it were actually sworn 
to. From the beginning they have had many candidates 
from among whom to make a choice. Among these were 
several very able men who would have well represented 
and honored California in the Senate of the United States. 
Yet our legislators would not unite upon any one of them. 
Thomas H. Bard of Ventura County, who has so unex- 
pectedly succeeded in carrying off the prize, was balloted 
for last session, but he did not succeed in securing a sub- 
stantial standing, and his name was invariably found at 
the bottom of the poll. His qualifications, whatever they 
may prove to be, were the same then as now, and as 
much was known about them, which is not saying much. 
Yet at this session he is elected on the first ballot by the 
unanimous vote of his party. Why the change? What 
has happened during the recess to take him from the bot- 
tom to the top of the poll? He has made no personal 
effort, has not button-holed or consorted with members of 
the Legislature, has given no pledges, but has remained 
in seclusion amidst his orange groves. All this furnishes 
a chapter of history that is as yet unwritten. Somebody 
intervened with something. Who and what was it? Time 
will tell. Meanwhile, Mr. Bard is our new Senator. He 
is so utterly unknown to the people of the State that he 
may prove to be either a Daniel Webster or a Montana 
Clark without surprising anybody. He goes to the Senate 
at a most important epoch in the history of the Pacific 
States. Great opportunities are his. Let us hope that he 
will prove equal to them. 

SAN FRANCISCO AND NAUGHTY PLAYS. 

MANY people, including many who live here, are 
pleased to call San Francisco a wicked town. That 
a certain amount of fastness is common here there can be 
no doubt; that our French restaurants and side-entrance 
saloons are the most "accommodating" in the country is 
beyond question; but in one particular, at least, we can 
hold our own with any city in the nation — and that is the 
stage. We will not stand for vulgar shows, and the sooner 
the managers find out the fact the better will it be for 
their pockets. A show that is suggestive and clever, like 
In Paradise, will attract crowds; a show that is stupidly 
vulgar like The Cuckoo, will keep people away; and a show 
that is putrid, like The Turtle, will call out the police. Per- 
haps we can stand things in our actual life that we will 
not accept on the stage, but the fact remains that the 
nasty show has no place in the theatrical scheme of San 
Francisco. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February io, 1900. 



THE EARLY RETIREMENT OF PREMIER SALISBURY. 

IT is not the least of England's misfortunes just now that 
her able and experienced Prime Minister is so certainly 
breaking down that the London press treats his early re- 
tirement as a fixed fact. He was in poor health when his 
wife died some two months ago, and the shock of that sad 
bereavement seems to have been too much for him. His 
friends are, however, more alarmed at his growing feeble- 
ness than he is himself. He persists in performing his 
double duties as Premier and Minister of Foreign Affairs, 
attends Cabinet meetings, and defends his policy in the 
House of Lords. Where there is so much grit there must 
be some recuperative power left, and the noble marquis 
may pull through, after all. But that, is clearly not the 
opinion of his friends and associates. Were there any rea- 
sonable doubt as to his true condition the London news- 
papers would not now be discussing the merits and de- 
merits of his possible successor with the sober earnestness 
they are doing. It looks as if Lord Salisbury's retirement 
is known to be actually impending. The Times calls him 
"the wisest man in England," and the Standard says he 
will "leave a void that no living British statesman can 
fill." He will be especially missed at the Foreign Office, 
where his prescience and guiding hand have carried the 
empire safely through many difficulties. Robert Cecil, 
now Lord Salisbury, has passed through experiences not 
usually allotted to one of his rank. He descends from the 
great Cecil who was Queen Elizabeth's Foreign Minister 
and chief adviser during the greater part of her reign. A 
younger son, Lord Salisbury, was not born to great ex- 
pectations. Accordingly, he early started out to make 
his own way in the world. He and his recently deceased 
wife occupied humble lodgings in London, and he took up 
the regular routine of daily journalism. Before long he 
was a "leader" writer, first on the Standard and then on 
the Times. Displaying marked political ability, the in- 
fluence of his family gained him a seat in the House of 
Commons, where, as Lord Robert Cecil, he sprang into 
the front rank of debaters, and his presence in any con- 
servative cabinet that might be formed became a neces- 
sity. Later, by the death of his brother, without heirs, 
he came into the family title and estates. Who his suc- 
cessor shall be is one of the questions now agitating Eng- 
land. The Duke of Devonshire, better known as Lord 
Hartington, inspires the most confidence in Conservative 
circles. Lord Rosebery is of course out of the running, 
until the opposition gains power. Mr. Chamberlain 
is being warmly urged by the Daily Mail and other influen- 
tial journals, but his time can hardly be believed to have 
arrived yet. 

THE EVOLUTION OF MILITARY TACTICS. 

THERE is a marked tendency on the part of certain 
amateur newspaper critics, to sneer at the British 
losses in the present Transvaal war. According to these 
bloodthirsty gentlemen the British are not losing enough 
men; they would have the South African veldt deluged 
with blood, instead of merely sprinkled as at present. The 
favorite plan is to publish elaborate tables of percentages, 
showing that the British losses, which have averaged be- 
tween five and ten per cent., are slight when compared 
to the numbers who fell in the great battles of history. 
"More men," they exclaim, "fell at Gettysburg in one hour 
than have been slain during the whole of the existing cam- 
paign." The statement, of course, is perfectly true, but 
it is obviously unfair to draw from this fact the deduction 
that the British troops have not behaved with their 
accustomed valor. These unfriendly critics overlook the 
circumstance that the conditions of modern warfare have 
completely changed, even since the comparatively recent 
days of our own Civil war, and the Franco-Prussian strug- 
gle. Military tactics are in the throes of the most start- 
ling evolution the world has ever seen, and no man can 
foresee the outcome. Great Britain, at an enormous cost 
in blood and treasure, is working out the problem for the 
benefit of the nations of the world, who will profit by her 
dearly bought experience without expending a cent or 
losing a man. It is lucky for the United States that in 
our recent conflict the foe did not give us an opportunity 
to teach the world a similar lesson. Had the conditions 
been reversed, had American troops been compelled to 



cross the Atlantic and fight their way through mountain 
fastnesses to Madrid, we should have found the problem 
almost as difficult as the one the British are now trying 
to solve. The only thing which seems clear at present is 
that modern changes in armament have conferred an 
enormous advantage on the defensive side, without benefit- 
ing the attackers to any great extent. The introduction 
of the long-range magazine rifle, quick-firing field artil- 
lery, and smokeless powder, are the three great factors 
which have wrought the change. The flat trajectory of 
the new rifles enables them to command an enormous ex- 
tent of ground, and the zone of fire is now so extensive 
that it is impossible for any body of troops to cross it and 
live when fighting men like the Boers, who know how to 
shoot straight. Smokeless powder refuses to betray the 
whereabout of the marksmen, and the defenders can lie 
pirdu in their entrenched positions secure against attack. - 
Reasoning from the dearly bought experience of the pres- 
ent war, military experts estimate that the power of the 
defense, as compared with the attack, is increased ten to 
one. Formerly the ratio was three to one, so that 
it is more than thrice as difficult to take an en- 
trenched position than it was a few years ago. 
Against such advantages the old fashioned rough-and 
ready method of hurling large masses of men at a position 
and taking it by assault, have proved utterly futile, and 
military scientists are now puzzling their brains to devise 
some new plan of attack which will be effective without 
being too costly. At present the only plan of subduing 
the Boers which seems at all feasible is to literally starve 
them out of their impregnable positions and force them to 
fight in the open, where their fate would be a foregone 
conclusion. 

ROSEBERY ON THE WAR. 

WHEN a cabinet change takes place, as it will after the 
next general election, which is bound to take 
place within a year, Lord Rosebery will probably be 
Great Britain's Prime Minister. Meanwhile, he is at 
pains to make it abundantly clear that his assumption of 
office will not mean a change of the Salisbury policy, but 
a more vigorous prosecution of it. He put up Mr. Asquith, 
his Chief Lieutenant in the House of Commons, the other 
night, who made abetter defense for Mr. Chamberlain than 
he was able to make for himself. Lord Rosebery, speak- 
ing at the opening of the town hall at Chatham, two weeks 
ago, said : "In such a war we must necessarily have bad 
moments. But I trust that, in the providence of God, we 
are striking a balance of the evils that Great Britain has 
undergone, and the good derived, and I do not think the 
balance is much against Great Britain. I was never so 
proud of my country as during the week following the bat- 
tle of Tugela River, when party politics disappeared abso- 
lutely, and gave way to a passionate resolve to pour out 
the last shilling and the last man to assist the country in 
her hour of need. Whatever foreigners may say, they 
have not got to the bottom of old England yet. The test 
of the character of the British people will alone counter- 
balance our losses. The reverses of the war have taught 
the country that the empire is a united empire. The war 
will be cheap if it has aroused the nation, as it has, to a 
sense that it must never again be unprepared, and that it 
must place things on a scientific and methodical basis. The 
task ahead is a great one, but it will be faced. This war 
will first be brought to a successful conclusion, and when 
that is done we must set to work and put the empire on a 
business footing, and strive to make it realize the British 
ideal of an empire without menace, without oppression — 
a model State, ruled by model institutions, and inhabited 
by a model race." Those are potential words as coming 
from the heir-apparent to power in Great Britain. They 
make it plain that there is no substantial division of sen- 
timent in that country as to the future course of empire. 
The baptism of fire through which England is now passing 
does not mean her decadence, but rather that union which 
is strength. The empire she is building is not nearing its 
end. It is oniy just beginning. 

To Cure A Cold In One Day 
Take Laxative Bromo Quinine Tablets. All druggists refund the 
money if it fails to cure. E. W. Grove's signature is on each box. 
26 cents. 



February »o, 1900. 



SAN ! TTKR. 




AMONG tbe fashionable on din of the day is one that 
goes to the effect that the young beaux of the swim 
are meditating a party. This means that they are pon- 
dering over the scheme of giving a real old-fashioned 
"boys and girls" gathering; nothing like the "children's 
dinner," where baby costume rules, but an actual boys 
and girls merrymaking, which (as Miss Laura remarked) 
would be simply the ordinary dance of the season without 
any oldsters. Rumor has it that the dance will take place 
in a private ball room of exceptional size, and no guest 
over twenty is to be allowed on tbe floor. 
» # * 

What is the matter with the professors of refinement 
and decency? This thought not unnaturally presents it- 
self to the mind of the theatre-goer of tbe present when 
attending performances which seem to grow actually worse 
each act. Is it that purity and modesty have gone out of 
fashion with our women? and is the taste of our men, 
young and old, grown so morbid and prurient they must 
have amusement of the dive order? It is really astonishing 
that some sort of protest has not long since been entered 
by those who aspire to lead society. 
» • * 

There is a good deal of talk going on at a certain military 
post, not a hundred miles from our city, anent the advisa- 
bility of "taking up" the newly-made bride of an officer 
whose experience in catering to the shoupers at a leading 
dry goods house is, in some folks' eyes, a detriment. How- 
ever, an old army matron is credited with saying that 
any one who can swallow the ex-Sergeant's progeny cannot 
find fault with a trifle like the above. 

* * * 

The girls of the present season had better hurry up and 
get out of the way of the crop of buds that will blossom 
forth in 1901. Surely a prettier set of girlies can no- 
where be seen than those who will then take the social 
plunge. And however popular the girl of many seasons 
may be, when it comes to novelty she isn't "in it" with 
the dtbutante who, not having already danced two or three 
winters with the Fortnightlies, can surely lay claim to be- 
ing a fresh face. 

* * * 

One of the charming daughters of a leading citizen is 
said to have made a young member of the social world very 
happy by accepting his suit, and now people are wonder- 
ing if the magnificent mansion of grandpa's, already built, 
or papa's, in course 1' erection, will be the place chosen for 
the wedding. 

ONE of the most remarkable sales of dry goods in the 
history of San Francisco is tbe one that has been go- 
ing on for the last few weeks at J. J. O'Brien's. Every- 
thing that woman wants, and many things desirable to 
men, are in the mammoth stock that is being sold at rock 
bottom prices. All kinds of dress fabrics, underwear, 
hosiery, laces, gloves, handkerchiefs, towels, trimmings 
and ready-made garments are to be found in great 
variety. The established name of J. J. O'Brien & Co. as- 
sures the patron fair dealing and polite attention. 

If too want an exquisite luncheon, dinner or breakfast served and 
cooked in real Parisian style go to the Maison Eiche at the corner of 
Grant avenue and Geary street. The Eiche has long been known aa 
the epicure's paradise. It's name is a familiar one to the good livers 
of the world. 



Drink Mumm's Extra Dry and you are drinking the finest and 
most popular champagne in the market. 109.303 cases of this wine 
were imported in the year 1899 — just 72.495 cases rn ore than any other 
brand. The vintage of 1895, a splendid one, is now on sale. 



Ah excellent commercial lunch is served daily by Fay & Foster at 
the Grand Hotel Cafe. The cooking is notably good and the service 
by trained colored waiters is careful and quiet. The quality of the 
beverages served from the Grand Hotel Bar needs no bush. 

Fb« stationery, steel and copper-plate engraving. Cooper & Co, 
746 Market street, San Franeisco. 



- Automobiles to we front 



The Sparks Machine 
the Best. : : 

Tito lightest, strongest cheapest and most durable. It cllml« tho stoopo* 
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It is what everybody wants. 

Thcro Is an active demand for tho company's stock. 

There It more money to be made In Automobiles thin In Oil or Mining. 

A HmtlcJ amount of stock is offered at One Dollar per share. Par valuo flO 
Full Information at the office of the 

Sparks Automobile Company 



325 Parrott Building. San Francisco. Col. 



S. GU00EN0UGH, Secretary. 



You cannot diminish drunkenness without diminishing crime, 
insanity, pauperism, and taxes. 



All this is done by 



The . 



Keeley 
Institute 



At 1170 Market Street, 
Donohoe Building, S. F. 



Or Carson City, Nevada. 



College San Rafael 



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Full colletric course of studies. A boarding school of highest 
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Located in the lovely Magnolia Valley 
Unsurpassed for beauty and health fulness. Address, 



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FRENCH LIBRARY AND FRENCH CLASSES 

This library is the most important of its kind, containing 20,000 books. 
Among them are the best ancient and latest authors. Under the auspices 
of the library are French classes for adults only, afternoons and evenings. 
Graduate teachers from France give tuition. Terms for library, 51 admission. 
50 cents monthly. Terms for classes— $3 a month, 2 lessons a week, entitling 
pupils to literary membership. Apply— French Library, City of Paris Build- 
ing, 135 Geary Btreet. 

The Solly Walter School of Illustration 

In Pen and Ink. 

26 O'Farrell street 

WM. WILLIAMS & SONS 

(LDT. OF ABERDEEN.) 

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Importers - HACONDRAY & CO. 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEB. 



February io, 1900. 




lEffiJfgsYwD 



"We obey no wand but Pleasure's. '* — Tom Moore. 

ONCE again the good old Bostonians are with us in a 
good old made-to-measure Bostonian opera, composed 
by an ex-townsman of ours, Minkowsky, and entitled The 
Smugglers of Badayez. I am afraid that this piece will al- 
ways be called The Smugglers of Badayez. I will rush in 
where play assassins should fear to tread and risk a 
prophecy to the effect that it will never know the popu- 
larity of abbreviation and be called The Smugglers. It. will 
live just as long as the Bostonians choose to keep it in their 
repertory, and then it will die a quiet, natural death. As 
presented by this firmly labeled band of favorites it is 
lightsome, jovial diversion. Despite the fact that Min- 
kowsky had been called an inspired composer by many of 
his colleagues here, there is nothing deep and serious in 
his opera. It is just a plain comic opera of the old type — 
not as catchy as Robin Hood or The Serenade, and uner- 
ringly commonplace in the libretto. It might have been 
written twenty years ago, so far as the modernity of the 
musical structure is concerned, and it might have been 
written by a syndicate as far as the individuality of the 
music goes. But it is fairly lively and notably picturesque 
as the Bostonians give it, and the lines are as conspicu- 
ously free from smut as the action is from acrobatics. 

Barnabee, of course, has his usual drunken scene, which 
he plays in the usual manner. Age cannot wither nor cus- 
tom stale the infinite sameness of Barnabee's stage jag. 
It is one of our national institutions. The people have 
made up their minds that it is funny and Barnabee is good- 
natured enough to humor them. Anyway, it is hard to 
teach an old dog new tricks. I like Barnabee for but one 
thing— he seldom if ever strains. He is the most languid 
of all our comic opera comedians, and he robs the stage of 
many of its customary terrors. I have often smiled, but 
never laughed at Barnabee. He has his own quiet Y. M. 
C. A. scheme of fun. It is not great, but it is good, and 
so far seems to have defied imitation. 

* # # 

Bar the stiffness of another twelve-month, Barnabee is 
the same old joke. Macdonald, too, is the same old joke 
and sings with the same old arrogance and seif-reverence. 
Frothingham is the same unique figure, and in a not over 
corpulent part supplies a great deal of fun. The one 
startling change among the old-timers is in Helen Bert- 
ram. Just at the time when you would think Miss Bert- 
ram had done her best— it was never a sensational best — 
she shocks you delightfully with a performance that is 
full of spice and electricity. The most companionable song 
in the score is a waltz, and this she sings with adorable 
dash and appetite. You hardly know her for the same 
old girl. 

* * * 

Among those not present in the cast are Jessie Bartlett 
Davis and Eugene Cowles. I miss the warm, milky voice 
of Jessie Bartlett, but I welcome her successor for other 
reasons, principally physical. Marcia Van Dresser is a 
beauty— a real, raving beauty, with a figure for a sculptor 
and a face to dream about, an oval face with features cut 
like in a cameo. Miss Dresser could not sing with any 
particularity on the opening night on account of a cold, 
and up to the time of writing I have been unable to pay a 
second visit to the Columbia; but she looked the part and 
her personality was charming, and the audience was hers 
to the last man— especially the man. Mr. Cowles' old 
place is taken by an amiable basso named John Duns- 
more, who scores his one hit in a soldier's march song 
The chorus is fairly young and in excellent tune, and the 
performance is marked by the same care and color that 
are characteristic of the company. 

* # * 

" I wonder how with such a play 
The management can make it pay? 
I guess I'll go around and see 
If it's as bad as it'a said to be." 
But I don't think they went in large mobs to find out 
about The OucJcoo. In fact, Mr. Prawley's second venture 



into made-in-Paris farce was not a success. In. Paradise 
was wicked, but not vulgar, and it was clever all the 
time. The Cuckoo is merely vulgar and never clever. It 
is the sort of piece that discourages the actors who play 
in it, and not even that industrious and charming young 
woman, Mary Van Buren, could get anything out of the 

principal part. 

* * » 

A play fashioned for merry making, crisply told, and 
most spicely flavored, a veritable counterpart of Charley's 
Aunt, entitled Oh I Susannah, which enjoyed a long run at 
the New York Lyceum Theatre, will be the Alcazar's 
offering for the coming week. There is, it is promised, 
nothing in the composition of the play which calls for one 
moment of serious reflection, and the general tone is de- 
cidedly French. This will mark the first production of 
Oh! Susannah in San Francisco and the first appearance 
of Stanley Boss with the Alcazar stock company. 

With the great competition which exists to-day between 
the theatres of San Francisco, it is incumbent on the 
various managements to give their patrons novelty week 
after week. In the face of this competition it speaks 
volumes for the excellence of the production of the merry 
comic opera, The Idol's Eye, at the Tivoli Opera House, 
that though now in the fourth week of its run the demand 
of the public for it is as large as ever, and the fifth week 
of the successful production is announced, commencing with 
next Monday evening. The third or fourth week of the 
run of a play in this city usually exhausts its drawing 
powers, but in the case of The Idol's Eye at the Tivoli the 
fourth week of the run exceeds its predecessors, and has 
in fact broken the record of the theatre. When The Idol's 
Eye is withdrawn it will be followed by a sumptuous pro- 
duction of the new comic opera Manila Bound. 

* # * 

The very first production of Victor Herbert's latest 
composition, The Viceroy, by the Bostonians at the 
Columbia Theatre the coming week promises to be a real 
event. Victor Herbert's reputation as a brilliant and suc- 
cessful composer has long since been firmly established, 
and this latest emanation deserves most intelligent con- 
sideration. The opera, after its production here, will be 
taken to New York for a long run at the Knickerbocker 
Theatre. From all accounts it will be a most elaborate 
production; the scenery by Ernest Gros and the costumes 
by Van Horn are said to be a bewildering and marvelous 
scheme of color. The Viceroy is a light, frothy story of 
Sicilian life, the action laid in Palermo during the six- 
teenth century, and recites the adventures of an usurping 
Viceroy, who is carried to sea by a band of piratical out- 
laws. The music is said to be in Herbert's best vein, and 
replete with sparkling melody and delightfully harmon- 
ized. Mr. Barnabee will play the name part, Miss 
Bertram will be the proscribed pirate and rightful heir, 
Mr. McDonald a captain of the guard, and Miss Van 
Dresser the Viceroy's daughter. 

* * # 

The Frawleys will say good-bye to us next week in An 
Unconventional Honeymoon, a Daly adaptation that tells 
the story of the matrimonial difficulties which beset Eric 
Aubrey and his wife on the very night of their marriage, 
and the winning over of Aubrey's wife by a very tactful 
method to which the husband resorts. The play is some- 
thing of a modern Taming of the Shrew and the Petrucio 
part is full of spirit and determination. The characters 
introduced include Eric Aubrey, a young Virginian of no 
wealth, who marries the daughter Leo of rich folks, and a 
young lady who has never been denied anything by her in- 
dulgent parents; Mr. and Mrs. Placid, her parents, Seba 
Barth, a painter who manages to win Philip Manning, the 
young lawyer, who has a special practice in the divorce 
line and is at all times ready to assist friends out of 
matrimonial difficulties; Tom Baycer the cousin of Aubrey 
who has a singular faculty of always arriving too late to 
be of any avail; Mr. Rehberg, who tries to defraud the 
young husband out of the rights to an important invention, 
but is thwarted by Leo, and a dozen other interesting 
people. The cast will include Miss Keith Wakeman (her 
debut with the Frawleys) and the full strength of the 
company. 



February to, 1900. 






The bill at the Orpheum is almost entire'; new. At the 
bead of the new bill come Cushmao, Holcomb arid C 
operatic vocalists who will present a musical come, 
titled "The New Teacher" which is said to be one of the 
cleverest things in its line. Monroe and Mack are singing 
and talking comedians and have made a big hit wherever 
they have appeared. Deets and Don are European cele- 
brities who call themselves "double voiced voca 
They have been brought direct from Europe for this en- 
gagement and a good deal is expected from them. The 
Romalo Brothers are famous acrobats. Their specialty is 
head to head balancing. At the request of a large 
number of Orpheum patrons, Frank Coffin, the well-known 
local tenor, has been re-engaged and will sing some new 
songs. The biograph will present a selection of entirely 
new views, some of them dealing with the history now be- 
ing made in Africa. The holdovers are Mr. and Mrs. 
Perkins Fisher, Irene Franklin, who leaves shortly for a 
six months engagement in Australia, and Papinta. 
» » * 

The stock company at the Alcazar has enjoyed a brisk 
week in Friend*, a play in which there is a lot of good 
American fun and a lot of bad melodrama. Howard Scott 
was largely applauded for his characterization of the 
opium-smoker. I never could see the sense of dragging 
this harrowing dope specialty to the footlights, but I must 
confess thatMr. Scott plays the part for all that it is worth. 
Miss Mary Hampton was fortunate in making her debut 
with the Alcazarians in a role that would stand for her 
overwrought voice and personality. While she does not 
get beneath the skin of Marguerite as Mrs. Boyle did and 
invest it with opulent Southern sympathy, she nevertheless 
gives a vigorous performance in her own usual way. Mr. 
Hastings was notably good as young Paddon. He played 
the part in just the right colloquial vein. 

* * * 

The concert given in the Sherman & Clay Hall on Tues- 
day evening by Mrs. Adelaide Lloyd-Smith was successful 
only in part, and Mrs. Lloyd-Smith did not contribute 
that part. She sang in a whole bunch of keys, evading 
the pitch with what seemed to be Satanic ingenuity, and 
was, to put it briefly, an all-round failure. The good work 
was done by the Minetti Quartette and by Cantor Stark. 

* * * 

The feature of next Thursday's symphony concert at 
the Grand Opera House will be a symphony composed by 
the director of the orchestra, Henry Holmes. It is the 
fourth of seven symphonic works written by Mr. Holmes, 
and this will be its first performance. It is entitled 
"Fraternity." Brahms, Beethoven and Wagner are rep- 
resented in the programme. 



M HENRI de Regnier, the French writer chosen as 
a the third annual lecturer of the Cercle Francais de 
l'Universite Harvard, endowed by Mr. James H. Hyde 
for the purpose of furnishing instruction in French litera- 
ture on the broadest lines, will not confine his lectures to 
Harvard. He will make quite a tour of the country that 
will include at least one lecture at the University of Cali- 
fornia. The French Academy awarded him this year the 
Prix Vitet, for his works, and M. Gaston Boissier, the 
Secretary of the Academy, expressed himself in the 
following manner in his official report: "M. de Rdgnier 
is one of the leaders of that new School which pretends to 
do no less a thing than modify the form and the spirit of 
French poetry. The enterprise is a daring one. Every- 
body recognizes that M. de Regnier has very rare poetical 
gifts; abundance and richness in images; amplitude and 
harmony of the period; a grace both provoking and 
natural that make him admired even of those his boldness 
displeases." M. de Regnier was made a chevalier of the 
Legion of Honor in 1897. He married the second daughter 
of Jos6-Maria de Heredia, of the French Academy, the re- 
nowned author of "LesTrophees," and he is in consequence 
of this the brother-in-law of M. Pierre Louys, the author 
of "Aphrodite" and "Chansons de Bilitis." 

Maibon Tobtoki, French Rotfsserie, 111 O'Parrell street. Private dinine 
rooms; banquet hall. S. Constantini. Proprieto . 



Mothers, be sure and use " Mrs. Winslow's Soothlnsr Syrup " for your 
chMdren while teethinar. 



Columbia Theatre. tk "™"- ES^St* 

Bvdnnlntr neit •An 

«»•!,. of impi.rt*iu-<\ Klrtl Urn* on »ujr •latftf. **U.IUi A Herbert's 

Ut«-«l work, 

THE VICEROY 

A mnKTiHiront production. The moil pretentious oomlo opera 
proMnU.fi"; 

G-. I ! -C _ — _ I — TL rt ,l Tin: POPULAR HOUSE. 
aniornia i neat re. ■*—■■ ■ miom by Them*. neis hi 

"''II week n( tin' I". ■ iv IMrM appearance of 

Oallfornla'a distinguished artiste, MIm Keith Wakcraan. Com- 
ing Kunday 1 lit M, February llth, tho laic Augustln Daly's 

I'lnirininc 00 

AN UNCONVENTIONAL HONEYMOON 

fwrnRTANT Wednesday afternoon, Fab, Hth, spec.*, perform - 
anoe <<f Tku.hy. Mir.-. Mary Van Bonn to hex fcamooa r..io. Fri- 
day afternoon, Feb, L6U., BpeoJsJ performance ol MmicSatcsOkks. 
Coming: The funny farce. Who in Who. 

AL a73 r Tk«-.4--^ Belasco & Thai.i„ Managers. 

nicazar I neatre. Phone.Mein2M 

Another New York success from the Lyceum Theatre, 

OH ! SUSANNAH. 

Cast with the full strength of the Alcazar Company. 
Matinees Saturday and Sunday. 
Prices, oil reserved— 1 Bo., 25c., 85o., 50o. 

— _ L « . . — San Francisco's Greatest M uslo Hall , 
PPneU IT, . O'Farrell St.. between S 



Monroe & Mack 
Romnlo Brothers 



Stockton and Powell streets. 



Deets & Don 
Frank Coffin 



GUSHMAN, HOLCOMB & CURTIS 

Mr, and Mrs. Perkins Fisher Irene Franklin 

Papinta Biograph 

Reserved Seats 25o. ; balcony lOo. ; opera chairs and box seats 80c. 
Matinees Wednesday. Saturday, and Sunday. 

T' , n \\ f\-- u . H«..«^ MBe * ERNESTINE KBBLraO, 
IV Oil Upera Flo USe. Proprietor and Manager. 

"Hoot Mon, it's a Braw, Bonnie Play. Ye Ken I " 

Next Monday evening, February 12th, begins the fifth week of 

the greatest triumph of comic opera, 

THE IDOL'S EYE 

And this is no fairy tale. 

Every evening at 8. Matinee Saturday at 2. 

The same old prices, 25c. and 50c. Telephone, Bush 9. 

Next production, the comic opera, Manila Bound. 

Grand Opera House-Special. 

Thursday afternoon, February 15th, at 3:15. Third 

SYMPHONY CONCERT 

Under the direction of Henbt Holmes, 

Reserved Seats: 25c, 50c, 75c, $1, and 81.50. On sale at Sher- 
man Clay & Co.'s. 

Western Turf Association, w^Sho^tE; 

Congress. 

TANFORAN PARK, 

Fourth Meeting. FEB. 12th TO FEB. 24th, 1900, INGLU8IUE 
Six high-olass running races every weekday, rain or shine, beginning 
at 1:30 p. m. The ideal winter race track of America. Patrons step directly 
from the railroad oars into a superb grand stand, glass enclosed, where com- 
fortably housed in bad weather they can enjoy an unobstructed view of the 
races. 

Trains leave Third and TownsendSts, at 9:00, 10:40, 11:30 a. m.; and 12:15. 
12:35, 12:50, 1:25 p.m., returning immediately after last race and at 4:45 p.m. 
Seats in rear cars reserved for women and their escorts. No smoking. Valen- 
cia street ten minutes later. San Jose and Way Stations — Arrive at San 
Bruno at 12:45 p. m.; leave San Bruno at 4:00 and 4:45 p. m. Rates— San 
Francisco to Tanforan and return, including admission to track. 81.25. 
W. J. Martin. President. F. H. Green, Seoretary and Manager. 

Sherman, Glay Zi Go.'s Hall. 

Tuesday evening, February 6th, at 8:15. Conoert given by 

MRS. ADELAIDE LLOYD-SMITH 

Dramatic Soprano, assisted by the Minetti QuaTtette and Cantor 
E. J. Stark: Roscor Warren Lucy, accompanist; flute obli- 
gato by Elias M. Hecht. 
Reserved seats, 81: on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s music store 



After the Theatre 



Go where the crowd goes—to 

. ZINKAND'S 

Listen to Stark's matchless string band and enjoy the finest 
wines, beers and supper. 

The Cafe Zinkand is society's gathering place after the show is 
. over. 



SAN PEANCISCO NEWS LETTER. 



February 10, 1900. 



THE FATE O F TH E SEQUOIAS. 

I ONCE read an exhaustive and painstaking article on 
the preservation of our great forests by means of de- 
stroying them. The wording was somewhat different, but 
that was the line of argument. 
Let me sum up briefly the leading points: 
"If the older trees are cut there is less danger of spread- 
ing fires, through the trees standing less closely together, 
and also from the fact that fewer branches fall — the old 
trees lose more than the others— to form a mass of inflam- 
mable material for the fire to run through. Furthermore, 
the presence of the loggers is a means of safety, as they 
are ever ready to fight fire should occasion demand. 

The larger trees being removed the younger growth 
has more freedom and consequently matures more rapidly." 
That is all I could find in the article, though I read care- 
fully the entire eighteen pages, in which these points were 
reiterated and enlarged upon in persuasive and seductive 
language. 

The object of all was to prove the criminality of Gov- 
ernment reservation of timber-lands. The result was 
to show how little the writer knew of his subject; 
or knowing how little he resembled the young man who 
did some lumbering on a small scale in his father's cherry- 
orchard. 
Now for the defense — of the reservations. 
In the fall of 1896 I filled the humble position of "slab- 
man" in one of the large lumber-mills near Fresno, Cali- 
fornia; and great was my surprise at what I saw, for I 
had swallowed that bit of fiction whole. 

The sequoia (redwood) grows to the largest size of any 
tree known. At the base the diameter is far greater in 
proportion than it is further up the trunk. The tree 
spreads out near its root, so that one which measures but 
eleven feet fifteen feet from the ground, often has a diam- 
eter of nearly twenty feet at the base. This enlarged por- 
tion is badly split, being almost in separate sections, in 
fact. The tree is cut above it, and the stump stands from 
six to ten feet high. Dried, this stump is far more inflam- 
mable than the green tree, protected by its two or three 
foot thickness of spongy bark, which blackens in a fierce 
fire, but does not bum. 

A scaffolding is built around the tree for the sawyers to* 
stand on. When the trunk is sawed part way through 
from both sides, wedges are driven in on one side, and the 
tree falls the opposite way. 

The sequoia is not a tall tree, considering its size: one 
which measures twelve feet in diameter, above the bulbous 
part, may be seventy feet in height. The wood is very 
brittle, even when green, and the branches are very small, 
seldom reaching more than eight or ten feet from the 
trunk. In falling, the giant strips the branches from 
several of its lesser neighbors. If it strikes fairly a tree 
of four or five feet in diameter — forty or fifty years old — 
it brirgs it down. 

If the ground is at all uneven — and it usually is — the 
monster itself is badly broken by the fall. 

I have seen a sequoia which stood seventy-rive feet high, 
fly into jagged blocks for half its length as it struck the 
ground. Out of the remainder two logs were sawed. 
Seventy-five feet, and twenty-four feet of its length saved 1 
It rarely happens that more than four logs are sawed 
from the best trees, for where the branches begin the saw- 
ing ends; that part being full of knots, the lumber is less 
salable. 

When the logs are ready a wire rope is attached to 
Ihem by means of large hooks driven into the wood; the 
stationary donkey engine puffs, and the log is hauled down 
hill to the skids. The log — it weighs many tons— may roll. 
Of course there is an attempt to block it; sometimes 
there's a man below it, and — well, the log rolls over the 
skids. 

Recovered? Not at all. It could be, of course, but it's 
easier to saw another. 

Along one mile of skidway I counted thirty-six logs 
which had pluDged and gone too far. These represented 
about 300,000 feet of lumber. The skidway had not been 
there more than four months. 

The sequoia has gone. One seventh, perhaps, has gone 
to the mills to be converted into lumber; the rest lies 
where it fell, or below the skids. More litter for fire to 



feed on than would have fallen from that tree in twenty 
years, and it takes less than five for a dead branch to 
decay, and become covered with moss, so that it will not 
burn. 

That is the way the forests are "preserved" by thinning 
them out. 

Many forest fires are started by some prospector's 
camp-fire, or by Indians. There probably are not many 
campers on or near a lumber company's ground; they are 
not usually allowed there. If a forest fire gets a fair start 
and a favorable wind, the loggers are not going to stop it. 
Could the Falls of Niagara be switched onto it, they would 
undoubtedly prove effectual; but the combined fire de- 
partments of New York and Philadelphia — supposing 
water to be plentiful — would find it to be more than a 
match for them. Not that the fire is so fierce in any given 
spot — the flames seldom rise higher than fifteen or twenty 
feet, except when running up some pine tree — but it is the 
area — often hundreds of acres. 

These fires destroy some of the pines, and perhaps a 
few of the smaller sequoias, but no large trees of any vari- 
ety, unless dry logs and branches are profusely piled 
among them. The loggers extinguish many fires whie 
they are still small: but they are the ones which are started 
by sparks from the donkey-engines. The only fires the 
lumber companies stop are the ones they set, and they 
don't always succeed in checking them — they don't always 
try I 

If a fire starts near the edge of the "timber," and is 
headed toward the "cleared" land, the boss is likely to 

say: " Let it go to h . It can't do no harm nohow." 

And so it may rage for days among the young trees— that 
part which has been "preserved." 

Just a word about the pine trees and firs. The waste 
is not so great. The trees don't break when they fall, 
and the lumber being more valuable than redwood, every- 
thing whioh will make a twelve-foot log, one and a half 
feet at the smaller end, is used. The logs are of ten barked 
in the woods, however, and the bark is the most highly in- 
flammable part. 

The skidways, too, are made of pine logs, and become 
soaked with the grease with which they are lubricated. 
They are never taken up when their usefulness is past. 
So the cutting of pines furnishes more fuel for the furnace 
in which the young trees are to be baked. 

These magnificent sequoias, the monarchs of the forest, 
have stood for over two hundred years; many a fierce 
forest fire has raged about them; and now they fall I and 
for what ? One seventh goes, likely, to furnish ties for the 
railroads — the ties could and should be made of iron — the 
remainder rots where it falls, or becomes a means of de- 
stroying the young forest. 

"Hurrah for the reservations!" I say. Let us have 
more, not less, of them 1 
Harold, Gal. Cloudesley Johns. 

A liberal education in art may be had by visiting the art rooms 
of William Morris, 248 Sutter street. On sale and exhibition are to 
be found paintings in oils, water colors, pastels, engravings, etchings 
and fancy prints. The very best quality of frames and frame 
materials are to be had at Morris'. There is always a picture show 
of interest in the gallery that is being added to day by day with the 
best work of native and foreign artists. 



The . . . 



Osteopathic Institute 



9 to 12 
1 to 5 
7 to 8 



Dr. A. C. Moore, Dr. J. F. Haney, A. T. Moore, Secretary. 
Chronic Diseases and Deformities SUCCESSFULLY treated. 
204 Suiter St., San Francisco. Phone, Main 100. 

FINE IMPORTED 

$30 == Scotch Tweeds == $40 

Also a large line of High-Grade Serges, Worsteds, 
Veatings, Golf Knickerbockers, and Hose : : : : 

C«« r jja| Have just received from London shipment of novelties in 
OLJOl-iai Ladies' Costume Cloths. Inspection Invited. 

CRAIG BROTHERS, Importing Tailors 

20 Sutter Street, bet, Kearny and Montgomery streets. Take elevator. 



February 10, 1900. 



TTER. 




" tlwr lb* Crtor ?" " Wh»» the deril »rt tlion I ' 
*Otm lh«l will clw the dcrll. air. wllh ran.'' 



FROM a secret source I have secured an advance enpv 
of the examination paper of the Call's "Home Study 
Circle." It follows: 

These examinations are open for all. Anyone who has 
the enterprise to look up the answers in the Public 
Library may receive a certificate and get his name in the 
paper by sending in his answer, together with one year's 
subscription. A committee consisting of Mr. Blodes and 
the office boy will referee the contest. 

I. (1) Do you or do you not consider that the Call Educa- 
tional Campaign is the greatest movement since the in- 
vention of wireless telegraphy? (6) Estimate the gain to 
the circulation. 

II. In your opinion, what is'the relation of the devilish 
policy of the sneaking, snivelish, underhanded Examiner, 
with its python's grip upon the fair limbs of the ship of 
state, to the eternal rhythm of harmonious suggestion, as 
interpreted by the moment of first impulse in King Leah ' 

III. Does Iago remind you of Andy Lawrence? 

IV. Compare and contrast the characters of Desde- 
mona and Mayor Phelan. 

V. In an unpaced poetical contest between Edwin 
Markham, Shakespeare and A. J. Waterhouse, what 
handicaps ought to be allowed? Why? Write an able 
and comprehensive summary, enumerating the benefits 
the Call Home Study Circle has brought into your cheer- 
less home. 

VI. On the whole, what do you think of this graft as 
compared with the Examiner Bible Class? 

VII. Is the theory of parenthetical relationships as ex- 
plained by Dr. Drownded, or the hypothesis of homelogous 
homogenieties as regarded in the imperative dissnciabilities 
of the allegro movement of rambic hexameters the most 
subtle theory of explaining the antipathetical unity of the 
correlated plot — divergence of Leah's bomocidal mania, 
or isn't it? 

VIII. Is your subscription paid? 

THE disfiguring of the beautiful Heine monument in 
New York has been laid at the door of the Salvation 
Army. These people, they say, have objected because 
God's beauties have been revealed in the naked figures 
upon the pile — because the Muses thereon were not fur- 
nished with blue petticoats and poke bonnets. The exhi- 
bitions of the Salvation Army have hitherto been offenses 
against good taste alone ; but this last manifestation is 
covered by provisions of the criminal code and should be 
prosecuted ruthlessly. 

[IS own elevator old Bradbury runa 
And this gets his name in the papers 
And all day he travels twixt cellar and roof— 
Another of Bill's funny capers. 

Bill says that he thus saves $10 a month 
And that he can save qnite a heap so : 
'Twas not by this method Bradbury got rich, 
But his favorite method to keep so. 

THE average citizen will note with joy that a setter 
has been dining upon the persons of two creatures 
known as "dog-catcbers." They had tried to catch him, 
and being a wise dog, albeit not particular as to diet, he 
caught them first. The dog-catcher is a necessary evil, 
with the element of evil much predominant over that of 
necessity. Nobody could imagine a man with mental and 
moral status on a plane above that of the canine, going 
into a business so brutal and distasteful to the normal 
senses. Thus is it that while all do not love the mongrel, 
all despise the tormentor of the stray cur, and see in any 
mishap to the hide of him a rebuke from heaven. 

THE scientist who has discovered bacteria in the holy 
water at Turin, may have stumbled on the microbe of 
sanctity. Nevertheless a system a sanitation designed to 
discourage the blessed germ would be viewed with favor. 



E 



H' 



1>u have been married lately in San Fro 
must have encountered William P. Danfortd. 
who runs the marriage license department ni 
Hall. Mr. Danforth goes by the lobrtas 
•>artly because of his pleasant cal'ing and partly be. 
•he possessor of a smile as guileless and as'swi ■. 
an.V of those which have made Venus' boy a household word. 
"Cupid" runs up against some queer customers once in a 
while, for marriage and death are common to all classes. 
The other day a lank and seedy individual, with an air of 
unimpeachable respectability, strolled into the department 
and asked if he could get a license. "Certainlv," replied 
Mr. Danforth, arranging his books with much" the air a 
dentist might assume previous to tackling an especially 
interesting subject. "But first," interposed the respect- 
able party, exploring his trousers pockets, "I should like 
to know how much one must pay for a permit to marry." 
"The fee charged by this office," said the god of beating 
hearts, " is two dollars." The prospective groom drew from 
his pockets a bunch of keys and a few humble coins. "Too 
bad," he sighed. " I only have tl.65 on hand. I fear I 
shall be obliged to postpone the happy event until the 
sixth of next month. Good-day." The Cupid stared 
blankly for a few moments at the retreating figure, then 
whistled softly. " If we don't have a bargain sale of mar- 
riage licenses pretty soon," he murmured, "there won't 
be any more work for the divorce courts to do." 



W 



HEN great-grandpapa was a squire 
He danced the stately minuet; 

And it was dignified enough 

For grandpa's silken legs, you bet. 



But in this moral 'Frisco town 

We fear grand-dad's reserved gyration 

Would shock the modest feelings of 

The Young Men's Christian Association. 

IT is amusing to note the rapid increase in the "medium" 
element of San Francisco. The business has grown 
wonderfully in the last few years. Every fourth house is 
possessed of a mind-reader, a clairvoyant, or at least a 
palmist. Their advertisements in the daily papers rival 
in size those of the largest wholesale houses, and the graft 
has so widened its sphere that love affairs and lost wills 
are away below par. The interest has all turned of late 
to mining. Five of the clairvoyants have hung out this 
enticing query: " Will you succeed better in the Klondike 
or ought you to go to Cape Nome? Enter and learn"; 
while a sixth quotes prices: "Love affairs, 50 cents. Is 
your husband true? One dollar. Good settlements in 
Alaska, five dollars." With prices so much lower than 
ever before, there is no cause for any one being without a 
true spouse or a gold mine — or a gold brick. 

HORACE L. Poulin is reaping the harvest he sowed, 
and in all likelihood regards the sowing as having been 
a mistake. Men who lure from their homes girls not. yet 
out of their teens, and cast them off when tired, need not 
expect a torrent of sympathy when the girls commit sui- 
cide or do some other thoughtless and unpleasant thing 
to attract attention. The girl to whom a man offers 
every association save that of being taken openly to the 
altar, might as well understand in advance that sbe is 
dealing with a scoundrel. The theory in the Amy Murphy 
case that actual murder was committed is ridiculous, but 
the moral difference between shooting a girl and forcing 
her to do the shooting herself has never been clearly de- 
fined. 

«S to a certain young idiot, known as "Jimmie" Bul- 
keley, it would seem that the normal portion of the 
community was entitled to protection. This prowling 
dotard, in his anxiety to display himself, has become a 
greater nuisance than any other with which the munici- 
pality has to contend. If for some of his malicious effron- 
tery he cannot be sent to jail, there are asylums for the 
feeble minded. 

Affairs have come to such a pass 

That Bulkeley thinks be is not in 't 
If any week slips idly by 

And he gets not his name in print. 

ONE day last week there were ten divorces filed at the 
City Hall and only nine marriage licenses issued. 
How many births were registered on that day has not 
been recorded. 



10 



SAN FEANCISCO NEWS LETTEB. 



February 10, 1900. 



3fe1©eKer-0o 



From early youth he dreamed his dreams 

And longed to shine alone. 
He cast abroad for glory and for fame 

He gave a course of lectures based 
On "High Art in the Home" 

But only deadheads to his lectures came. 

He painted yellow posters in 

An Aubrey Beardsley vein 
But no Moicenas came his work to see ; 

He courted social lionhood and grew a fuzzy mane 
Alas ! No swells invited him to tea. 

But now at last dark days are past 

No longer he's obscure ; 
The cynosure of every eye is be, 

For his kilted polychrome 
Who carries aft and fore 

The "hoot mon" placards for theTivoli. 



Orrin Peck is a very live denial of the common idea 
that all painters are hard up. As an all-round good 
fellow and wide "spender" he is a wonder. In the clubs, 
in the streets, and in the cafes and restaurants his hospi- 
tality is a by-word. He is a real Bohemian from way- 
back, and his last crust is always ready to be divided 
among his friends or his friends' friends; and fortunately 
for them it is a crust of gold, and the last of it is a long 
way off. 

Modern Bohemia is made up of two classes — wits and 
wine buyers. Orrin Peck is one of those rare chaps that 
belong to both classes. When he is up and doing, the joke 
is generally on the other fellow. But there are times and 
times, and I am writing this to tell you about one of the 
times when Peck was the joke of his own hospitality. 

In company with Joullin, Stanton, Prank Goad and sev- 
eral other chappy Bohemians, he drifted into an out-of-the- 
way caf6 the other night, and was surprised to see there 
a gathering of some forty sons of toil quietly talking in a 
foreign tongue. One of them, a big, handsome fellow, 
caught Peck's artistic eye. 

"By Jovel" said he to Stanton, "I'd like to paint that 
fellow. I wonder if I could get him to come up to the 
studio some day and pose? What sort of a crowd is this?" 

"These are the German bakers," said Stanton without 
a blush; "they're holding a union meeting, and you'd better 
not break in." 

"I don't care if they are holding an inquest," said Peck. 
"I want that model." 

And straightway Peck approached the man, and in his 
best German asked the honor of his company in a drink. 
He was answered by a cold, hard silence. Again he 
pressed the invitation, again no response. 

"What sort of Dutchmen are these that won't under- 
stand my dialect?" said Peck. 

"Frenchmen,'' answered Joullin. "Let me be your in- 
terpreter." In the choicest Latin Quarter French 
Monsieur Joullin invited the entire house to walk up and 
take something with the celebrated artist, Orrin Peck. 
And he didn't have to say it twice. Peck paid without a 
murmur. 

* * * 

The presence of the plague at Honolulu has revealed 
some peculiarities of the form of government in our new 
possessions in the Pacific. The Government seems to be 
a sort of close corporation full of Poo Bahs. No official 
seems worthy the name unless he holds at least ten posi- 
tions. This condition of affairs has provoked some humor- 
ous situations — humorous in the face of the piague. 

Minister of the Interior Cooper, for instance, is Presi- 
dent of the Board of Health. When the people at Hilo 
opposed the landing of goods from Honolulu, with shotguns 
to enforce their opposition, the Minister of the Interior 
was sent to Hilo to assert his authority. He was also met 
by the shotgun delegation with Sheriff Andrews at its bead. 
Sheriff Andrews was also the agent of the Board of Health 
at Hilo. After some parleying Cooper asked the agent 



of the Board of Health to come out and see him on the 
steamer. 

Finding that he could produce no effect ou the sheriff, 
Mr. Cooper asserted his authority as President of the 
Board of Health. 

"As our agent," said he, " I order you to use your 
power to have these steamers landed." 

" It '8 no use trying," said Andrews, "the people won't 
stand it, and I am with the people." 

"Very well, then, you are discharged." 

"I'm still sheriff." 

" I regret that in none of my capacities can I reach you. 
I shall send the Minister of your Department down to- 
morrow." 

"He'll never get near enough to see me," retorted 
Andrews pulling away from the steamer. The shotguns 
were turned on the sheriff, and he was warned away. 

" It's all right, boys," he yelled; "I've been fired. I am 
no longer with the Board of Health." 

He was permitted to land. 

Minister Cooper, in one of his other capacities, ordered 
the Chief of the Fire Department to burn down certain 
buildings. The chief protested, and said that he would 
appeal to the Board of Health. At the meeting of the 
Board the chief claimed that the buildings were not in an 
unsatisfactory condition. As President of the B^ard of 
Health, Minister Cooper had to agree with the chief, and 
he reversed the order made by his other self. 

Even in time of plague all the elements of comic opera 
are to be found in our new island possessions. 

* * * 

In San Jose the streets are dark, 

The dynamo has ceased to whiz; 
The spooner on the street doth spark, 

For light is gone and joy is his. 
And while the youth of San Jose 

Is lingering from home away, 
The burglar makes his absence pay 

And drives a thriving biz. 

* * * 

I wouldn't believe this if I hadn't heard it myself. The 
other day as I sat basking in the sunshine of the Coroner's 
office the telephone ran«, Dr. Beverly Cole took down the 
receiver and I caught the following conversation: 

" Hello— hello— h-h-e e-l-l-o-0-0 1 Is this the Coroner's?" 

"It is." 

" I want you to come for my mother-in-law. Hurry up, 
will you please." 

" Well wait a moment. What is vour name?" 
[I will kept this secret.] 



'Address?" 



[Ditto.] 



"Cause of death?" 

"Accidental poisoning bv carbolic acid." 

" When did death occur?" 

"When did death occur??? We-e-U, about— What 
time is it now?" 

"Half past four." 

"Half past four? Well put down time of death as 4:45." 

"What?" 

"4:45." 

"Do you mean to say she's not dead yet?" 

" O she's pretty near it, Doctor. Pretty far gone!" 

"That will do. Can't handle it. Telephone again when 
she's dead." 

" But, Doctor, I have no telephone and it costs me five 
cents each time. Please come now; please do! I guarantee 
she'll be all right by the time you get here. Please " 

But the Coroner banged the telephone, and refused to 
have anything to do with the case until the worst had 
happened. 

# * * 

Major Hooper, the suave boniface who presides over 
the destinies of the Occidental Hotel, is the very perfec- 
tion of policy. None enter his house but to become the 
particular object of his solicitous regard ; none leave 
without carrying with them the firm belief that they, and 
they alone, were the special guests of the charming 
Major, and it was for their particular benefit the mansion 
was erected. 

These impressions are created in a variety of ways, but 
the things that count the most are the delicate little com- 



February 10, 1900. 



m:\vs litter. 



I! 



pliments that tbe Major Is coutinualk 
wbo favor him with their patronage. Liti 
that are doubly appreciated because thi 
and spring from the host's warm heart. 

These compliments often become tangible in the form of 
floral offerings, and 'twas such an offering that gave occa- 
sion for this little story. 

There was a small dinner at the Occidental Hotel— 
likewise a man sick unto death. The dinner and the man 
have no connection other than tbe one provided by the 
Major in the following manner: 

Among the floral decorations on the table was a beauti- 
ful bunch of calla lilies tied with a white ribbon. They 
were left on the table when the guests departed, which 
was at about the same hour that a bellboy brought down 
word to the office that the sick man had gone above. 

The Major was equal to the occasion. "Here," said he, 
"take these lilies to the family as a token of the sorrow I 
feel in their loss." 

The bellboy took the flowers and climbed slowly up the 
stairs. In a few minutes he came hurriedly down. The 
report was correct, but the Major had slightly mis- 
interpreted it. The sick man had gone above. He had 
recovered sufficiently to be moved to more commodious 
apartments on the upper floor. 

Witnesses of the little occurrence say that the temper- 
ature in the office rose so rapidly that the thermometers 
broke and the lady clerks fainted. 

* * * 

The Russian Bear 's preparing to 

Exterminate Japan; 
The Dervishes are rowing it 

All over the Soudan ; 
The Boers are managing to keep 

The British on the hop 
And killing Tommy Atkinses 

On every Transvaal Kop. 
And in the happy 'Orient 

The terror spreading Turk 
Upon the poor Armenian 

Gets in his bloody work, 
While Uncle Samuel's volunteers 

Subsist on pork and beans 
And hunt the dark-skinned goo-goo in 

The far-off Philippines. 
What means these gentle happenings? 

My friend they're indications 
Of that long-time expected dawn 

Of peace between all nations. 

* * * 

IN the person of William H. Mills the Southern Pacific 
Company has commissioned a capable energetic man to 
take charge of its exhibit at the Paris Exhibition. The 
mission with which Mr. Mills is charged cannot but result 
in good to the Pacific States and Territories and to all the 
States and Territories served by the lines of the Southern 
Pacific. The Company will make two exhibitions in Paris 
during the Exposition of 1900, one intheTrocadero Palace 
grounds, in a separate pavilion, erected by itself, and the 
other at No. 29 Boulevard des Italiens. At the latter 
place the Company will maintain a Bureau of Information, 
where information will be furnished concerning the natural 
resources of the States and Territories represented by 
Mr. Mills. The exhibit at the City office will be highly 
artistic and will be fully illustrative of the capacities of 
our forests, mines, fields, orchards and gardens. In con- 
nection with this Bureau of Information, the Company 
will be pleased if residents of the States and Territories 
served by its lines, will make its Parisian office their head- 
quarters during their stay in Paris, should they contem- 
plate a visit to that metropolis during the Exposition. 
Information will be furnished concerning steamships, and 
routes of travel in the United States and upon the Con- 
tinent. It will be the pleasure of the Company to furnish 
information to any one contemplating a visit to Paris re- 
lating to accommodations, apartments, or hotels. Letters 
or telegrams sent in advance of the coming of the sender 
will have due and prompt attention. The Company's 
Bureau of Information will be free to visitors from the 
States and Territories served by its lines; and a register 
of such visitors will be kept, with their Parisian addresses, 
so that the Register itself will constitute a Directory of 
visitors in Paris from these States. 




This machine will work 
as no other typewriter 
works — more easily, 
more swiftly, longer and 
better — because it's a 

Remington 

WYCKOFF, SEAMANS & BENEDICT, 
327 Broadway, New York. 



SAN FRANCISCO BRANCH: 211 Montgomery street. 

S.&G.GUMPCO. 

Annual Clearance Sale. 
Great Reductions in Prices! 

Bargains = = • - = 



In Pictures, Art Goods, Ornaments, 
Crockery, Glassware, French and 
Italian Furniture, Etc. 

113 Geary street. 

San Francisco ^ m - Larse n - Onager 
Novelty Leather Co. 

Manufacturers of the California Brand Ladies' and Gents' 
Fine Belts and Pocket Books. All kinds of Leather 
Novelties. Leather and Canvas Sporting: Goods. 
Our Specialty: Mexican Carved Leather Goods. 
Medical, Surreal and all kinds of Drummers' Cases. 



412 Market street, 



Telephone Bush 94 



San Francisco 



12 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEE. 



February 10, 1900. 




A possibility that some one might make a 
The Knockers few dollars out of an investment iu oil has 
Hard at Work, brought out the "Knockers" of San Fran- 
cisco in all their force, and Dothing is left 
unsaid or undone to wreck the industry, which continues 
to grow nevertheless. People are warned against having 
anything to do with the development of oil for the reason 
of the uncertainties which it is suggested attend the in- 
vestment. It is the old cry of "stale fish" hurled from one 
..side of the street against the rival across the way. This 
is the usual way we get along here; one knocking the 
other with the result that strangers go away fully im- 
pressed with the obstacles which lie in the way of any one 
who tries to introduce some new line of business. The pea- 
nut vender on the corner is prepared to swear the fellow 
down the block puts arsenio in his caramels if an oppor- 
tunity offers to divert a little trade moving in bis direc- 
tion. The minute there is nothing in it for Mr. Jones, the 
idea of Mr. Smith seeking capital to sink an oil well is 
simply preposterous. To go further, should Smith suc- 
ceed in producing oil at a rate which will permit him to 
pay one per cent per month upon the par value of his 
shares, Jones is out with a caution to his neighbors against 
touching such risky ventures, claiming that if the coin tied 
up in the old stocking at home is not earning much it is 
always in evidence, anyhow. Jones does not run the game, 
consequently it is no good, and Smith is a fraud in the 
eyes of that walking model of excellence — his saintly 
critic. Undoubtedly the work of the "knocker" has had 
much to do with dulling investment of local capital in oil 
shares. Tt will in time result in driving the business else- 
where. Instead of being the distributing center for the 
rapidly growing yield of California oil San Francisco will 
probably be forced to take a back seat and let Los An- 
geles or some other progressive city of the West monopo- 
lize the trade which should be ours. The "knocker" is 
now fully recognized as a natural product of conditions 
which a breath of enterprise would sweep away whenever 
it begins to develop in a proper spirit among the masses. 
The quality of the commodity bearing this label as it is 
represented in this community at present is calculated to 
make a pagan sneer. In a healthier business atmosphere 
the 'knockers" existence would be of short duration. 
Fortunately the success of the oil industry is not depen- 
dent solely upon local capital, and the range of the 
"knocker" is limited to the little particular puddle in 
which he wallows. 

Business in local stocks continues quiet, al- 
Local Stocks though prices have shown a hardening ten- 
Rule Firm, dency for some time past. The bubonic 

plague scare at Honolulu has thrown a dam- 
per upon the sugar stocks, but this will not last forever, 
and the crop prospects justify the belief that higher prices 
will rule again before long. Competition in the gas and 
electric supply has a tendency to disturb the situation in 
the present line of investment of this class, and holders 
are naturally nervous and distrustful of the future. The 
shares of ocean carriers are strong under the most flatter- 
ing prospects for a steadily increasing business, and some 
large profits have been made in them by investors who 
were clever enough to forsee the future before the ad- 
vance movement in values sets in. So far there has been 
no failure in the regular monthly dividends, which seem 
assured in all directions at prevailing rates for the current 
year. 

Were it not for a feeling of uncertaintv 
Mining Claims at about the title to Cape Nome prop- 
Cape Nome. erties, a large trade would be carried 

on in them here, prior to the rush 
which will soon set in for that locality. A number of 
promising locations have been offered for sale of late by 
their owners, who require capital to carry out their plans 
during the coming season. Some of these people are 
thoroughly reliable and deserving of financial assistance 
which, however, is withheld on the grounds that claim 
jumping will undoubtedly give more or less trouble when 



the crowd gets in. It is said that arrangements have 
already been made by some of the wealthier pioneer 
miners with leading law firms of this city to secure their 
attendance at Nome when navigation opens, in case of 
any disputes over the title to their claims. In regard to 
the tide lands below the line of ordinary high tide, the 
Commissioner of the General Land Office has already de- 
cided that the Federal Government has no jurisdiction in 
the matter, the sovereign rights resting with the States 
themselves when admitted into the Union. This leaves 
the ownership of such lands at Cape Nome subject to 
actual occupation, and open when vacant to the selection 
of all comers. It is likely, however, that the coming sea- 
son will see some definite ruling in regard to these claims, 
which will prevent disputes, not unlikely to arise the way 
the matter stands now. Claims located above the high- 
water mark are subject to the Territorial mining law, and 
with a proper system of recording, which will undoubtedly 
be secured, every security will be afforded locators the 
same as elsewhere in America. 

A payment of $25,000 made during the 
The Comstock week ends the liability of the Comstock 
Share Market, companies on their contract with the con- 
tractors for the cheap power plant, mak- 
ing a total of $75,000 paid on account, the remaining 
$25,000 of the $100,000 due being held in abeyance until 
after the works are in operation, which will not be for some 
months yet. This will relieve the comoanies from a finan- 
cial load, and place them in a position where they can 
work to better advantage, free from a debt which bore 
heavily on their resources owing to the depression which 
now prevails in the business. Stocks should do better 
from now on, more money being available for the work of 
exploration. A satisfactory test of low grade ore from 
Con. Cal. -Virginia has just been made, and from now on 
the output of bullion from this property should increase 
with the prospects opening up on the lower levels drained 
by the hydraulic elevators in the C. & C. shaft. The out- 
look for the Comstock is brighter than it has been in 
years past, and it certainly cannot be charged against 
the management if the new era dawning on the lode is not 
one of active and prolonged prosperity. 

The southern metropolis of the State, which 
Los Angeles for a time was coment to list its oil stocks 
Oil Exchange, upon the San Francisco Exchange, has 

evidently concluded that it can do as well 
at home. The announcement is now made that it has 
opened an exchange of its own for business, and the follow- 
ing companies have been listed: Columbia, Union, Central, 
Continental, Brea Canyon, Petroleum Development, West- 
lake, Burlington, Fullerton Consolidated, Wilson, Welling- 
ton, Imperial, United Petroleum, Home, Rex, Yukon and 
Duquesne. The membership is limited to fifty, with thirty- 
eight accredited members and twelve applications on file. 
No company will be listed until it becomes a producer. The 
companies now on the list produce 5195 barrels of oil 
monthly, not including the Home and Southern Consoli- 
dated. As the bulk of the money to open up these wells 
has been provided by the people of the Southern counties, 
it is only natural they should desire to profit by the chance 
which now offers to invest their idle capital at remunera- 
tive rates of interest. Oil production is generally recog- 
nized as one of the great industries of the old and new 
world, and some of the largest individual fortunes of the 
century have been made in the business. That the people 
of Southern California are fully alive to this fact is shown 
by the masterly way they have taken hold of the business 
and the success they have already scored in the develop- 
ment of the infant industry. Up here in San Francisco 
the slow coach element can see nothing but danger in 
branching out this way, while machinery all over the State 
is being adapted for the consumption of oil as the fuel of 
the future. 

IT is said that the high prices of copper have caused a 
contraction of 12,079 tons in the English and German 
consumption, while France meantime showed an increase 
of 1066 tons. In this country the use of this article has 
increased 185,969 tons, or 51J percent. The copper pro- 
duction for 1899 was 480,000 tons, compared with 437,000 
tons for 1898. Supplies in Europe and America have 
meantime increased 64,400 tons, or 17i per cent. 



February 10. 1900. 



SAN" I 1 NEWS LETTKIi. 



«3 



Business in the local speculative market 
Local Market for oil shares has been quiet of late, and it 
for Oil Shares, will likely remain so until the reorj>aniia- 
ti >n of ao oil exchange is completed. Tois 
w now contemplated, and committees of the tnroexchanges 
•re arranging a plan for the amalgamation of the Califor- 
nia and Producers' Exchanges with one strong organiza- 
tion. This is the only thing which will resurrect the busi- 
ness, which has been practically killed by opposition 
between the members of the rival boards. That this fact 
is recognized is evident from the unanimity with which the 
proposition to combine has been received "by both parties, 
and the change wi.l be beneficial. In the meantime the 
leading companies are vigorously at work in the field, and 
in many cases the most satisfactory results have been 
obtained. New strikes of oil are reported in all directions, 
and money is forthcoming, the bulk of it having been sup- 
plied from the interior of the State, a large proportion 
coming in from the Eastern States, where the value of 
flowing wells is fully appreciated, aud even from Canada. 
Before long a number of these companies will be self-sup- 
porting and in a position to pay dividends on their out- 
standing shares. 

FOLLOWING are the transactions on the Stock and 
Bond Exchange for the week beginning February 2d 
and ending February 8th : 

MISCELLANEOUS BONDS 
Contra Costa 5V..... 5,000 @ 106% Oceanic Bond* S%.. 7.000 

EdtaoB L * P«!i... 0.0OO912»K S F & S J V Ry 5^-12.000 

Lor. Anela Ry i\ 15.000 <9 106-106}$ SP of Arizona 6V . 2.000 
N.P Ooaet Ry eX... 1,000 (8 103 S P of Cal ;i905) 654. 5,000 



5 5.000 9106 



WATKR. Shares. IFel 

Contra Costa Watcr._1710 74 

SpriiiE Valley Water. 039 91 
Oas and Electric 

Equitable Oaa 500 4 

Mutual Electric 5 14 

Oakland Gas 60 45 

Pacific, Gas Inip'v'nt. 355 51 

Pacillc Lighting; 150 44 

Gas and Electric 989 51M 

Banks. 

Bank of California.... 62 401% 401% Miscellaneous. 

Powders. Alaska Packers 60 

Giant 270 94% 94 Oceanic S S Co 15 



STOCKS. 
L'st Sugar Stocks. Shares. 

72 HanaPCo 670 

9354 Hawaiian C & S Co... 25 

Honakaa 530 

■j'. • Hutchinson 1042 

14 Makaweli 1125 

45 Ouomea 330 

48% Paauhau S PI Co 1325 

44 Street Railroads. 

50 MarketStreet 440 




120 
94% 



The transactions for this week amount to 10 352 shares and 58,000 
bonds, against 8249 shares and 50.500 bonds for the previous week. 

Trading in Pacific Gas and Gas and Electric has been quite heavy, 
and both stocks have gone up slightly in price. * 

Spring Valley keeps Arm at 93% to 94, at which prices about 689 
shares have been dealt in. On Tuesday, Contra Costa sold down to 
72, recovering to 74 the following day. 

Sugar stocks have been heavily traded in, and to-day (Thursday) 
ruling prices were lower than earlier in the week. 

The Giant Powder stock remains firm at about 94, and the excel- 
lent financial condition of the company, with its future prospects 
and its handsome dividends of 75 cents a month, should make the 
stock cheap at these figures. 



CHICAGO IN THREE DAYS 
Via Chicago, Union Pacific and Northwestern Line every day in the 
year from San Francisco at 8:30 a. m. Boilet, smoking, library cars, 
with barber. Double drawing-room sleeping cars. Dining cars — 
meals a la carte. Breakfast in Diner on leaving Oakland Pier. 
Daily through tourist car to Chicago without change at 6:30 p. m. 
R. R. Ritchie, General agent Pacific Coast, 2 New Montgomery 
treet, (Palace Hotel) San Francisco. 



THE "OVERLAND LIMITED" -A Solid Vestlbuled Train 
Via the UNION PACIFIC leaves San Francisco daily at 8.00 a. m. 
Breakfast served in dining Car. 

Three dava to Chicago without change. One day quicker than 
any other line. 

Finest modern Pullman equipment, including library and bullet 
cars and dining cars, a la carte. D. W. Hitchcock, No. 1 Mont- 
gomery street, San Francisco. 



ASK THE TICKET AGENT to send you from Chicago to New 
York, Boston, or other Eastern cities, over the Nickel Plate [N. 
f. C. & St. L. R. R.] Quick time, satisfactory service and no 
extra fares charged passengers. Jay W. Adams, Pacific Coast 
Passenger Agent, 37 Crocker Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

The most comfortable way to travel to Portland and all points 
in the Northwest is by the steamers of The Oregon Railroad & 
Navigation Co., E. C. Ward, General Agent, 630 Market street, S. P. 

Fihe Sanitary Plumbing at J. Ahlbach's, 136 Fourth street. 



MOET & CHAN DON 
CHAMPAGNE 

Absolute fa^ts that cannot be disputed 

FIRST — The house of Moet & Chandon 

was founded in 1743. 
SECOND— The house of Moet & Chandon 

owns more vineyards than all of the other 
houses combined. 

THIRD— The sales of floet & Chandon 

throughout the world greatly exceed those 
of any other brand. 

FOURTH— The wine shipped to the United 
States at the present time by the house of 
Moet & Chandon is of the celebrated vin- 
tage of 1893, of which they hold a sufficient 
reserve to insure its continuance for a con- 
siderable period. 

FIFTH— noet & Chandon Champagne has 
been served exclusively for a great many years 
at most of the prominent society functions. 

SIXTH— After repeated sampling and careful 
comparison with all the other Champagnes 
by the ablest experts, Moet & Chandon has 
been pronounced, without question, far super- 
ior in quality to any of the other brands. 

--New York Herald. 



McMENOMY Established 1866. 



Telephone Main 1481. 



Is the leading Retail Butcher 
of San Francisco : : : : 



Supplying: of families a special ty. 

Stalls 7, 8, and 9 California Market. 



CITY STREET IMPROVEMENT CO. 

Proprietors Fifth floor. Mills Buildine. San Fianoisoo 



Bitumen Mines 



Santa Cruz and Kins City, 
Monterey county, Oal. 

Contractors for all kinds of street work, bridges and railway construction, 
wharves, jetties and seawalls. 

Blake, Moffit & TOWne Telephone Main 199 

Dealers in PAPER 



Blake, Moffit & Towne, Los Angeles. 
Blake. McFall 4 Co.. Portland. Or. 



55-57-59-61 First street. S. F. 



La Grande Laundry 



Telephone Bush 12 

Principal office, 23 Powell street, opposite Baldwin Hotel. 
Branch— 11 Taylor street, near Golden Gate avenue 
Laundry— Twelfth street, between Foleotu and Howard 
streets. San Francisco. 



14 



SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTEB. 



February 10, 1900. 



INSURANCE. 



THE fire at Honolulu on the 20th ult., which consumed 
an area bounded by Kukui, River, and Queen streets 
and Nuuanu avenue, some 14 blocks, has raised the ques- 
tion as to who is liable for the damages. It was intended 
by the Board of Health that a portion of Block 15, where 
the fire started, should be burned as has been done with 
other plague spots. The entire fire department forces 
and four engines were on hand. After about an hour the 
wind rose and changed to the east, and carrying the blaz- 
ing embers upon the roofs of the buildings in the vicinity, 
in a very short time the fire had passed beyond control. 
It resulted in the loss of one engine and a chemical en- 
gine house, and practically cleaned out the entire China- 
town of Honolulu. The United States steamship Iroquois 
had two lines of hose out, from which streams of sea water 
were poured upon the Honolulu Iron works, which were 
saved. 

The area burned is not so large as that of the great fire 
of 1886, but the number of buildings burned is far greater 
and the class better, while the damage will greatly exceed 
that of the '86 fire. The exact amount of loss is unattain- 
able at this date, but will be enough to wipe out the item 
of profit from the fire underwriting standpoint for some 
time to come. Dynamite was unsuccessfully employed to 
stop the progress of the fire, and the water supply 
proved to be entirely inadequate for a conflagration of 
this character. The Honolulu agents met and adopted a 
resolution, which embodied the fact that since the fire was 
caused by action of the Civil Government, they would not 
regard the companies as liable, but in case of claims would 
report the same to their home offices and await instruc- 
tions. 

The following resolution was passed by the Board of 
Fire Underwriters of the Pacific at a special meeting 
held February 6th in this city: 

We, the undersigned, representatives of insurance com- 
panies doing business in Honolulu, H. I., agree not to 
recognize or admit any claim for loss by fire caused di- 
rectly or indirectly by order of the civil authorities. 

We also agree to cancel pro rata any policy presented 
for cancellation covering on property in the district 
burned. 

Signed: 
Alliance Assurance Co. \ „ „ ., „. ,, 

Commercial Union Ass'nce Co. { U F ' MulllDS ' Manager. 

Com'l Union Fire Ins. Co., E. T. Niebling, Asst. Manager. 

Royal Insurance Co , Rolla V. Watt, Manager. 

Greenwich Ins. Co., Tom C. Grant, General Agent. 

London & Lancashire, 1 

English-American Und'trs I t, ™ „„., ...» 

Nor walk Fire Ins. Co. , f D - E " Mdes ' Asst - Mana ger. 

Netherlands Fire Ins. Co. J 

Norwich Union, W. H. Lowden, Manager. 

Scottish Union & National, R. C. Mpderaft, Gen. Agent. 

iETNA Ins. Co., Boardman & Spencer, General Agents. 

Palatine Ins. Co., L'td j r,. m r> 1 a » „ 

Traders' Ins. Co. \ Chas - T - Parker . A ^t. Mngr. 

Ins. Co. op North America, James D. Bailey, Gen. Agent. 
Atlas Assurance Co., Frank J. Devlin. Manager. 

Union Insurance Co., ) t t?j r. »» 

Pennsylvania Fire Ins. Co. \ T - Ed"- Pope, Manager. 

National Fire Ins. Co., t ,-, „ ^ 

Springfield Fire & M. Ins. Co. \ Gea D ' Dormn . Mngr. 
German-American Ins. Co. 1 

German Alliance Ins. Assn [ G. H. Tyson, Gen. Agent 
Boston Ins. Co. ) 

Manchester Assurance Co. "I 
Caledonian Ins. Co. I T D ™, , ,. 

American Ins. Co. f L ' B ' Edwar< ™, Manager. 

American Fire Ins. Co. J 

Hartford Fire Ins. Co. ( w ,..„„ „ . . . . „ 
New York Und'trs Agency \ whltne y Palache, As. Mgr. 

Imperial Ins. Co., Ltd. / tit t t j ™ 

Lion Fire Ins. Co., Ltd. , Wm - J " Land ers, Res. Mgr. 

Phenix Ins. Co. of Brooklyn, H. McD. Spencer. 



United States Ins. Co., W. O. Wayman, Manager. 
American Fire Ins. Co. of Phila. ) E. Brown & Sons, 
Svea Ins. Co. i General Agents. 

Law Union & Crown Ins. Co., Catton, Bell & Co., Mngrs. 

The companies above signing are all issuing the New 
York form of standard policy, which is especially classed 
as an excepted hazard "losses caused directly or in- 
directly by order of any civil authority," and which in full 
is as follows: "This company shall not be liable for loss 
caused directly or indirectly by invasion, insurrection, 
riot, civil war or commotion, military or usurped power, 
or by order of any civil authority; or by theft; or by 
neglect of the insured to use all reasonable means to save 
and preserve the property at and after a fire, or when 
property is endangered by tire in neighboring premises; 
or (unless fire ensues, and, in that event, for the damage 
by fire only) by explosion of any kind, or lightning; but 
liability for direct damage by lightning may be assumed 
by specific agreement hereon." 

There is no question but that there is any number of 
policies of the old form in force in the Islands which do not 
make losses or damages caused by civil authorities an ex- 
cepted hazard, and it will be interesting to watch the set- 
tlements of these claims. There are some other com- 
panies writing in the Islands which do not report to San 
Francisco, among which are the Union, of England, which 
reports direct to London, and the New Zealand, which re- 
ports direct to New Zealand. 

H. K. Belden is in Chicago to attend the annual gather- 
ing of the Hartford managers. 

T. E. Pope, manager of the Pennsylvania and Union, 
will on the 1st prox. remove his offices from 436 to 510 Cali- 
fornia street. The new quarters are larger and lighter. 

Mr. W. H. Smollinger, he of the busted Covenant Mutual 
fame, in his address to the members of the Covenant 
Mutual in apologizing for its failure, uses all the regular 
thread-bare stock arguments with regard to the non-suc- 
cess of assessmentism, and says: "Impracticability to 
furnish permanent insurance on the post mortem assess- 
mentism plan is chiefly owing to the absence of security 
for the 'pocket reserve,' and therefore it is but a rope of 
sand. In this respect the Covenant Mutual is no excep- 
tion." He also states that the natural cost of post mortem 
insurance must increase with advance in years. This is a 
change of opinion upon his part from what the literature 
of the Covenant Mutual used to advance, but agrees with 
the position which the News Letter has taken, and which 
every insurance man knows to be true. He wails about 
the mean attacks which have been made upon the now de- 
funct company, the unfair suits that were brought against 
it, and which the courts usually sustained, the cruel ad- 
vantages which were taken, the cinch bills which were in- 
troduced into the Legislatures especially directed against 
the Covenant, the antagonism of the old-line press, etc., 
and finally comes to the close of his address with the fol- 
lowing: "With receipts inadequate to meet the losses, to 
say nothing about accumulating the reserve contemplated 
by policies paying in excess of the table requirements for 
yearly term insurance, with confidence shaken in the en- 
tire assessment system, with conditions precluding the 
writing of new persistent business, with law suits pending 
on every side brought by the beneficiaries of lapsed policy 
holders, trial courts holding against us, the Directors 
wisely adopted measures of rigid economy resulting in an 
accumulation in the expense fund, and carefully considered 
propositions for re-insurance, under which the member- 
ship could be protected as a whole. This meeting was 
called that the situation might be placed before you for 
careful, candid consideration. Some plan of re-organiza- 
tion must be adopted if the Association is to continue; in 
its present financial condition it cannot much longer 
exist." 

The Covenant Mutual of Galesburg, 111., leaves many 
mourners, and the News Letter only hopes that they will 
profit by their experience. 

One of the leading agencies has discovered a coming 
manager in a suburban town, and accordingly appointed 
him local agent. After the receipt of his supplies, he 
wrote to the office and asked: "Have you any objection to 
my getting some nice cards and circulars printed to send 
out in the country? I will pay for them myself. I enclose 



Febru 



•ry 10, 1900. 



BAM J rTEIt. 



'3 



• ttamp for reply." And now that manager 15 trembling 
Id bis shoes over the early coming of this local as hi 

r a two months' visit to Manager Oross, E. R. 
Tillinghast. the Superintendent of the Western .i : - 
of the Provident Life Association, left this week 

for his home in New York. 

Colonel Wm. Macdonald, manager of the London and 
ashire, is out of the city. 

The News Letter congratulates Mr. C. T. Parker. He 
has been appointed Assistant Manager of the Palatine 
under Chas. A. Laton, Manager. Mr. Parker has earned 
his promotion by nine years' continuous and faithful service. 

The Illinois Life Association, formerly the Bankers and 
Merchants Life Association — whatever that was — is cir- 
cularizing California soliciting business. This company 
is not admitted to nor licensed in California, and had at 
the close of business in 1898 less than 5000 policyholders 
and about $60,000 assets. It is evading the law, and any 
corporation that does this is not liable to be regarded as 
issuing gilt-edged insurance. 

The New York Fire Department has had installed as 
a part of its equipment a portable search-light. It is in- 
tended for use at night fires or where smoke is very dense, 
as the light penetrates smoke and enables firemen to fight 
fire and save life much easier than with the old-fashioned 
lantern. The machine is built by the La France Fire 
Engine Co